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Clellen Aalona (2011, T): Price 202@8:30 AM

Title: The Relationship between Emotional Intelligence and Psychological Skills Usage in Athletes
Major(s): Exercise Science
Advisor(s): Concepcion
Abstract: In everyday life, people have the notion that acknowledging and dealing effectively with emotions contributes to their wellbeing. On the other hand, ignoring them or not dealing with them properly can deteriorate their wellbeing, especially if it happens on a regular basis (Martins, 2010). Emotional intelligence is defined as "the ability to monitor one's own and others' feelings and emotions, to discriminate among them and to use this information to guide one's thinking and actions" (Salovey & Mayer, 1990). Recently, sport psychology researchers and practitioners have become increasingly interested in exploring the influence of emotional intelligence in the sport domain (Meyer & Fletcher, 2007) as it may be related to an individual's psychological skills and performance. The aim of this study was to determine if differences in emotional intelligence and psychological skills use existed across gender and sport-type (team and individual). Male and female collegiate athletes were invited to complete an online survey that contained a consent form, demographic information, the Emotional Intelligence Scale (EIS; Schutte et al., 1998) and the Test of Performance Strategies (TOPS; Thomas, Murphy, & Hardy, 1999). The findings from this study will be discussed.

Landon Aano (2014, T): Berglund 200@8:00 AM

Title: 'Ike aku, 'ike mai, kōkua aku kōkua mai; pēlā iho la ka nohana 'ohana. (Recognize others, be recognized, help others, be helped; such is a family relationship.)
Major(s): Business
Advisor(s): Griffie
Abstract: Na Haumāna O Hawai‘i (N.H.O.H), Pacific University’s Hawaiian Club puts on an annual lū‘au every second Saturday of April. This lū‘au is not only important to the club and Pacific but it serves as a medium for the students of Hawai‘i to perpetuate their culture through chant, song, and dance. Over the years the lū‘au has established itself as a key event at Pacific University. From the humble beginnings of a few hundred people to the staggering 2,000+ people that now attend the event, the lū‘au has been sold out over the past few years. Based on our work with N.H.O.H, we will formalize marketing and financing plans so that in the future students will have an implementable plan that is both efficient and effective. The financing plan includes an analysis on expenses in order to identify ways to reduce costs and wastes, and also a pricing plan for lū‘au tickets that will be appropriate for both the Hawaiian Club and it’s audience. The marketing plan entails a detailed S.W.O.T. analysis, an assessment of alternatives and substitutes, and recommendations for implementing several different advertising and promotion campaigns. As the Hawaiian Club is a non-profit organization, we want to create a plan that will attract a larger audience for the club’s annual lū‘au that will enable the club to mount two full shows, Friday and Saturday so that the club can continue to grow and provide all members with the experience and ʻohana college students can use on their journey through Pacific.

Michael Abang (2014, T): Marsh LL5@8:30 AM

Title: Island Dreads
Major(s): Art
Advisor(s): Cheyne
Abstract: Island dreads are the reggae musicians from Hawaii who have channeled their culture(s) and Aloha spirit into the music they create. I wanted to share the music they produce like a concert. By using traditional tattoo motifs from my own Filipino heritage and Hawaiian culture, I have decorated the music of the Island Dreads to visually capture and promote the positivity and meditative qualities reggae music has. Each design respectfully correlates to the musical journeys of the featured artists in each piece. The motifs used were carefully researched and applied in hopes to connect further with those culturally aware of them and their meanings, especially to those who are far from their home in Hawaii.

Punneh Abdolhosseini (2014, T): Marsh 201@3:00 PM

Title: Diversity In Outdoor Recreation
Major(s): International Studies
Advisor(s): Mahar
Abstract: Ethnically diverse populations lack participation in activities considered outdoor recreation. This can be said to be a reflection of the way that outdoor recreation was developed in our country. Factors such as cultural practices and norms and the lack of opportunity that ethnically diverse populations have experienced has contributed to an overall lack of participation. This research is focused on understanding the ideas of how different ethnically diverse groups would like to see outdoor recreation change to better suit their needs and cultural values. Through a series of interviews an understanding of how these populations feel excluded will be collected. From this information better ways to attract diverse populations towards outdoor recreation can be determined.

Kellie Abe (2014, P): Strain Hall 2nd Floor@3:00 PM

Title: The Effects of Causative Pathogens of Ocular Infections on the Human Ocular Microbiome
Major(s): Biology
Advisor(s): Halpern
Abstract: The human microbiome is made up of commensal communities of microbes located in specific regions of the body. The stability and composition of these communities are important in maintaining essential functions and metabolic activity for many physiological processes. In particular, the ocular surface is continually exposed to the environment, allowing many microbes to enter the eye readily. These exogenous invaders include pathogens that disrupt the microbial community of the eye and are thought to lead to ocular infections such blepharitis. Preexisting bacteria of the ocular microbiome may also lead to infections in certain circumstances. For example, changes in the microbial community due to stress, trauma, and aging may lead to an increase in virulence of opportunistic residents of the ocular community causing infectious diseases of the eye such as conjunctivitis. In hopes to improve proper diagnosis and treatment of bacterial infections of the eye such as blepharitis and conjunctivitis, characterizing the core microbiome of the ocular surface has become a proposed solution.

Emily Abramson (2014, T): Warner 28@8:00 AM

Title: The Creation and Production of "The Spectacle": A Choreographic Process
Major(s): Dance
Advisor(s): Camp
Abstract: A choreographer's job is multi-faceted; the choreographer is responsible for not only choreography, but also many other aspects that require leadership and organization, including research, scheduling, directing, lighting, and costuming. In order to create "The Spectacle," I had to hold auditions, cast dancers in the piece and then individual roles, develop the choreography and teach it to the dancers, provide a weekly rehearsal schedule, design costumes, and work with the stage manager to create lighting design for the piece. "The Spectacle" is a twelve minute long work that investigates the human psyche in four parts: 1) "The Invitation," 2) "A Flight of Whimsy," 3) "Beyond the Veil," and 4) "Lucent Echoes." By utilizing a circus theme, I was able to integrate ideas from theories of personality psychology as well as more universal themes of individuality, belonging, and free will. This project was developed out of a desire to create a work from original thought and combine psychology and dance, as well as explore a deeper theme of experiences and emotions involved in finding one's self.

Emily Abramson (2014, T): Marsh 106@1:00 PM

Title: Fiction, Fantasy, and First Years: Analyzing Empathy and College
Major(s): Psychology
Advisor(s): Burns-Glover
Abstract: First year seminar [FYS] courses are commonplace in universities (Hendel, 2007). Their focus is both to promote writing and also social skills. Research (Oatley & Mar, 2006) indicates that reading fiction and storytelling play an important role in the development of empathy. However, recent research indicates that a) school children are reading less fiction and it is less likely assigned in high school, and b) college aged students are increasingly less empathic. The relationship between reading and writing skills and empathic subscale scores were explored in this study as well as the relationship between students' actual SAT/ACT scores, self-reported scores on the Interpersonal Reactivity Index [IRI], and grades earned in the First Year Seminar course. Five demographically representative sections of FYS completed surveys during the semester and released their academic records (HS GPA, SAT/ACT). They completed the Interpersonal Reactivity Index (a measure of empathy) and reported if they took AP or Honors English courses in high school. They were asked to report on their goals for college (e.g., "to prepare for graduate studies," or "to get a Liberal Arts education", etc.) and their expected grade in FYS. I tested three hypotheses: a) that students who had taken AP or Honors English would have higher IRI (Empathy) scores; and b) that both cognitive (SAT/ACT, HS GPA) and personality (IRI-empathy scores) would predict FYS grade. Of the 73 students who provided full responses, I found those who had taken AP English or Honors did have slightly higher scores on the IRI, but the difference was not significant. When both cognitive (SAT/ACT+ HS GPA) and Personality (Empathy) measures were entered into a prediction model for Final Grade in FYS (0 to 4.00 scale), I found that this model was statistically significant: 11.3% of the variance in FYS grade was explained by these variables( F=2.13; p=.04). Inspection of the zero order and partial correlations indicated that the best predictors were the combination of students' overall IRI, SAT/ACT and their HS GPA.

Taisen Abreu (2011, T): Price 214@3:00 PM

Title: Electroglottography & Fast-Fourier Transforms of Sustained Phonation
Major(s): Physics
Advisor(s): Dawes
Abstract: The ability to speak, a human being's most dominant form of communication, allows for the production of a wide range of sounds. However, as a result, vocal strain can potentially arise due to the overuse of the vocal folds in sound production. Using Fourier spectral analysis, sound pressure generated by vocal fold oscillation can be studied in terms of component frequencies. Research conducted in the medical field typically compares sound pressure at the vocal folds with articulated sound expelled from the oral cavity. This data shows a discrepancy in amplitude following comparison of their respective spectra. In order to characterize this discrepancy, we collect vocal fold data using electroglottography and expelled sound pressure data using an audio microphone.

Andy Ackerman (2007, T): Price 202@12:00 PM

Title: X-Cross Productions Web Site
Major(s): Media Arts
Advisor(s): Geraci


Abstract: My senior project is the creation of the Web site for X-Cross Productions, a company that I have also launched that provides video production and post-production services for regional athletic teams. The site will provide users with the ability to order DVD's produced by X-Cross or for other teams to contract for video editing work. At xcrosspro.com people or teams also have the ability to view sample videos, download an order form, or simply find out more about the company. The site is designed using established approaches involving color, typography, and layout. Using both Macromedia Dreamweaver and Macromedia Flash, xcrosspro.com is able to incorporate basic html as well as Flash animation in order to make the Web site come to life.

Kaley Adams (2014, T): McGill Auditorium@2:30 PM

Title: Investigation of Calcitonin Gene Related Peptide (CGRP) in the rat brainstem and its connection with pain inhibition
Major(s): Environmental Studies
Advisor(s): Gundersen
Abstract: One area of the mammalian brain known to influence pain transmission is the rostral ventromedial medulla (RVM), which sends both pain facilitatory and pain inhibitory projections to the spinal cord. It has been suggested that an imbalance in modulation between the inhibitory and facilitatory pathways could play a role in chronic pain conditions, which is why clear understanding of these pathways is imperative for development of future pain relieving medications. Previous research provided evidence that specific neuropeptide transmitters such as Calcitonin Gene Related Peptide (CGRP), are involved in pain modulatory pathways in the brain. The Heinricher lab at OHSU has found that the Parabrachial nucleus (PB) is activated by pain signals and sends axon projections to cells in the RVM2, which then send projections to the pain synapses in the spinal cord. Currently it is unknown whether the neurons that project from the PB to the RVM also contain previous studied specific neuropeptide transmitters that are involved with pain induction that could be released onto RVM neurons. In order to better understand the modulatory pathway involved in pain modulation, this study focused on determining the identification of what specific neurons travel from the PB to the RVM via immunohistochemistry method.

Jessica Adamson (2014, T): Marsh 206@8:00 AM

Title: Implementation of a Health and Independence Program into New Family Style of Living for Adults with Intellectual and/or Developmental Disabilities
Major(s): Public Health
Advisor(s): Peterson-Besse
Abstract: Currently in Oregon, there are four types of living styles for adults with intellectual and/or developmental disabilities (I/DD): foster homes, group homes, supportive living services, and state operated community programs. These four types of living styles support health and independence of the person with I/DD in various ways. However, these models do not support all aspects of health including emotional, physical, and social health along with independence inclusively. This capstone presentation will suggest a new type of living style for adults with I/DD called the family style of living. Family style of living will aim to be all-inclusive for the health of the person while also providing opportunities to increase their level of independence. It will establish the supportive nature of a family, along with an available in-home nurse. At the same time, this housing development will allow independence of the person in his or her home. This presentation will propose the need for the implementation of this living style in a way that provides health supports along with supports to increase independence. The presentation will also describe limitations, findings, and other future considerations for the implementation of this program.

Hector Aguilar (2014, T): Berglund 232@8:00 AM

Title: The Myth of the Grover
Major(s): Sociology
Advisor(s): Eisen
Abstract: What is a Grover? I propose that this mythical creature is a creation stemming from a disconnect between Pacific University and the surrounding Forest Grove community, enabling students to engage in "othering" residents of Forest Grove. Interviews with Pacific University students, suggest that the "Grover" is constructed as a creepy, unappealing individual who is likely to be doing something out of the ordinary when spotted. A person's appearance, comportment and relatability determine what a Grover is. When viewing an individual for the first time, students compare the individual's presentation of self to their own. If the presentation of self is different than the student's, the student will often label the individual as a "Grover". The results seem to support my hypothesis because the residents appearance, comportment, and relatability are what makes students differentiate between themselves and the outsider, or in this case, "Grover". The presentation of self that a "Grover" displays, according to my study, is one of a less cultured and less educated individual; a member of a lower social class. This contrasts drastically with the presentation of self that the average Pacific student displays which makes it easy to differentiate between an outsider ("Grover") and someone who belongs (the student). This study is important because it should help people understand why the "Grover" is and will continue to be a part of Pacific's campus culture.

Chelsea Aipoalani (2014, T): Price 203@4:00 PM

Title: Deforestation and clear-cut logging effects on freshwater microbial biodiversity and water quality in freshwater streams at Chehalem Ridge Natural Area
Major(s): Biology
Advisor(s): Sardinia
Abstract: Freshwater streams are arguably one of the most vulnerable ecosystems in the world today due to the threats that humans pose to these ecosystems and the immense amount of biodiversity contained there. The act of deforestation and clear-cut logging can damage the health and quality of streams flowing through disturbed areas. The main objective of this study was to analyze the effects of selective logging and levels of human interference on water quality and microbial communities present in two different streams at Chehalem Ridge Natural Area. Total aerobic heterotrophic bacteria, fecal coliforms, and fecal streptococci concentrations were collected from two different sites and isolated from water samples using selective and differential media. Some physical and chemical characteristics, such as temperature and pH, were also determined for all water samples. The mean aerobic heterotrophic bacterial concentrations were significantly greater in the pristine, undisturbed site than the human disturbed site. There were more fecal coliforms isolated from the disturbed site, however this difference was not significant and no fecal streptococci were isolated from either site. Although there seemed to be a correspondence between the temperature, pH, dissolved oxygen, and the aerobic heterotroph concentration isolated, no other correspondence was observed between bacterial concentration and other physical or chemical parameters tested. Our results suggest that the selective logging and the human interference occurring at the sites have an effect on the overall quality of the water, however the extent of the effect requires additional study.

Kelli Aken-Pagdilao (2014, T): Berglund 216@2:30 PM

Title: Block Play in the Early Learning Community: Uncovering the full potential of blue block play
Major(s): Education
Advisor(s): Phillips
Abstract: The intent of our capstone project is to research the specific kinds of interactions that affect children's block play. From research gathered we understand the benefits and potential learning situations the blocks present to children. We gathered: observational field notes, pictures, video, and documented interactions with students. Data was synthesized and analyzed through the lens of distant colleagues' work, as well as through our own personal experiences of observing in the ELC. We adapted some of the teacher scaffolding strategies we felt most useful in order to test effectiveness and have identified a few different tools and specific ways to engage children and challenge their critical thinking minds. Furthermore, we have identified that the existence of social hierarchies within the ELC has an effect on block play. It is through these methods we've been able to uncover specific kinds of interactions that play a role in unlocking the full potential of blue block play.

Hector Alcayde (2012, T): Price 204@1:00 PM

Title: The Effects of a Self-Talk Training Program on Levels of Self-Confidence and Anxiety
Major(s): Exercise Science
Advisor(s): Concepcion
Abstract: Background. The multidimensional anxiety theory (Woodman & Hardy, 2003) illustrates the relationship between cognitive anxiety, somatic anxiety, self-confidence, and performance. Previous research has shown that self-talk can minimize anxiety and boost self-confidence. Purpose. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of self-talk on levels of self-confidence, anxiety, and performance during a dart-throwing task. Methods. Participants were randomly assigned to one of two groups: an experimental group that received the self-talk training and a control group that received no mental training. The self-talk group was trained and coached to use positive self-talk while performing the dart task. Both groups were assessed with a pre- and post-test of the Competitive State Anxiety Inventory-2 (CSAI; Martens et al., 1990) that measured cognitive anxiety, somatic anxiety, and self-confidence; the self-talk subscale of the Test of Performance Strategies (TOPS; Thomas et al., 1999) that assessed the amount of self-talk the participant uses; the Self-Talk Grid (Hardy et al., 2001) that assessed the effectiveness of their self-talk. Participants threw 10 rounds of 3 darts per practice session 3 times a week for 3 weeks. Scores were averaged each session. A tournament was held between the participants on the final session to compete for the highest score and attempt to increase anxiety. Post-test data was collected at the final tournament. Results. Findings and discussion will be presented on Senior Projects Day 2012.

Alea Aldaz (2007, T): Price 202@9:00 AM

Title: Biological Mechanisms that Influence Senescence and Aging
Major(s): Biology
Advisor(s): Halpern


Abstract: Aging or senescence is the process of physiological and cognitive decline that all organisms undergo during the second half of their lifespan. This is usually most evident in the years following the reproductive stages of their life. This talk will explore research that looks into why organisms age and what causes organisms to age at different rates. I will discuss the causes of cell damage that are believed to lead to aging, as well as explore theories of aging and how organisms deal with cell damage.

Marisa Allen (2009, T): Price 204@9:00 AM

Title: Global Warming: The Mathematics Behind Climate Modeling
Major(s): Mathematics
Advisor(s): Guenther
Abstract: Global warming is a controversial topic, in part because the complex mathematical concepts that are used to explain this phenomenon are rarely made accessible to the general public. In this project, we explore the mathematics and scientific principles behind climate models, in an attempt to demystify global warming. In particular, we will look at the equations used in complex climate models, as well as a simple radiative forcing equation used in general climate models (GMC’s). We then investigate the effect of rising CO2 levels on the governing equations of climate change.

Rebecca Allen (2014, T): Berglund 139@4:30 PM

Title: The Modern Life of Bea
Major(s): English: Creative Writing
Advisor(s): Mitra
Abstract: My creative writing thesis consists of two parts, one creative and one critical. For the creative portion, I have written a piece of fiction, titled The Modern Life of Bea, that adapts Shakespeare's play Much Ado About Nothing into a young adult story from Beatrice's (Bea), perspective as she blogs the events of the play. The story follows Bea's actions and reactions within the play's narrative, but in a modern setting with modern problems. My piece portrays all of the intrigue, fake death, and love of Shakespeare's original work, reshaped for the 21st century. Through the process of writing this adaptation, I looked to the work of Helen Fielding in Bridget Jones' Dairy. For the critical portion of my thesis, I explored how Fielding was able to reshape Austen's iconic story, Pride and Prejudice, into a modern day setting and how the epistolary format worked to shape the voice of the narrative. I also briefly explore, with the help of Pam Houston's piece "Not Istanbul," the impact that addressing the audience directly has on the story, especially within a young adult piece. It is my goal, with this exploration of voice and adaptation, to find an effective and engaging way to present the classic work of Shakespeare to a younger audience.

Sara Allender (2009, T): Price 202@8:30 AM

Title: The Effects of Fatigue-Types on Response Time
Major(s): Exercise Science
Advisor(s): Jackson
Abstract: One of the more popular topics of research in exercise science is fatigue and its effects on motor performance. Fatigue comes in multiple forms and has been shown to affect a number of different behaviors, including response time. What has not been examined is whether the effect is contingent on the type of fatigue. Purpose: The purpose of this study is to examine the effects of cognitive and physical fatigue on the components of response time (reaction time and movement time). Methods: 40 members from the Pacific University community were recruited as participants. All participants were subjected to physical fatigue (treadmill running) and cognitive fatigue (Sudoku puzzles, crossword puzzles, or word memorization), and were tested on components of response time following each. Analysis: Multiple one-way ANOVAs were used to analyze the changes in components of response time to each type of fatigue. Differences between acoustic and visual stimuli on the fatigue types were also examined. Results: No significant differences were found in either reaction or movement time for physical or cognitive fatigue. There was also no difference found between auditory or visual stimuli. Conclusion: Contrary to the expectations for this study, it seems that the type of fatigue does not specifically affect a particular component of response time.

Abdullah Almatrood (2011, T): Taylor Auditorium: Marsh 216@2:00 PM

Title: The Knight Hal
Major(s): Media Arts: Film and Video Production
Advisor(s): Hardacker
Vaisburd
Abstract: The Knight Hall is a short horror film that is about a group of girls that go to the Knight Hall office and experience supernatural events that happen there. In addition they deal with demonic possession. Through the use of flashback, we become better acquainted to these characters.With this film, Abdullah depicts an example of a Muslim/Arab family, and how they live their lives. Abdullah, a student from Saudi Arabia, has seen many false depictions of Muslims and how Muslim men treat women. An important aspect of this film is to show a Muslim woman and her life with her Muslin husband. Abdullah chose to make a horror film because it is challenging genre and because the filmmaker was curious to experience the audience reactions to the film. The filmmaker explores the lessons learned in his Film/Video classes about the way to think about movies, and the different ways of editing, cinematography, lighting, music, sound and employing effects. The filmmaker also puts into practice what he learned outside the school of the school setting, including years of movie watching.

Kristen Almgren (2009, T): Price 204@2:30 PM

Title: Partitions: How Many Different Ways Can You Get to the Center of a Tootsie Roll Pop?
Major(s): Mathematics
Advisor(s): Rowell
Abstract: In this presentation we introduce the idea of partitions as well as generating functions. With these ideas in mind we examine a variety of examples in order to give a summary of the techniques that can be applied to partitions and generating functions. With these techniques in mind, we present a problem relating two sets of partitions. After an examination of the known proof of the problem, we extend the problem to a more general setting.

Ahmed Alnasir (2014, T): Strain 121@8:00 AM

Title: Arabglish
Major(s): Computer Science
Advisor(s): Khoja
Abstract: Arabglish is a web based translation application that utilizes a database contains not only words, but also explanations and guides users to the accurate pronunciation. Being a web based application makes Arabglish accessible from everywhere. The main goal of Arabglish is to make learning Arabic to English speakers easier, and vice versa.

Lena Aloysius (2008, T): Marsh 206@10:30 AM

Title: Piecing the Puzzle Together: An Analysis of Vladimir Putin?s Approach to Russian Foreign Policy
Major(s): Politics and Government
Advisor(s): Seward


Abstract: Russian foreign policy has gone through many transformations since President Vladimir Putin took office in December 1999. His approach to foreign policy remains unclear to many scholars and the international community as a whole with various interpretations ranging from authoritarian to the international relation theory of realism. To best understand the transformations of this inconsistent foreign policy, the Walter Russell Mead model using various schools of thought will be incorporated. Through a series of analyses of the schools of thought, this model will take a different look at the nature and causes of Vladimir Putin’s approach to Russian foreign policy.

Theresa Alsop (2009, T): Price 203@8:30 AM

Title: Stem Cell Therapy and the Treatment of Leukemia
Major(s): Biology
Advisor(s): Schnorr
Abstract: Stem cells can become any cells of the human body and are important for current research because of their promising treatment potential for a range of diseases. Already stem cell therapy has been utilized in the treatment of leukemia. Allogenic therapies focus on the use of donor stem cells to reconstitute the blood system. Although this is most effective, donor cells may not always be available, which would lead to the use of the patient's own cells in autologous therapy. These therapies, in conjunction with chemotherapy and maintenance therapy, have demonstrated a higher success rate in terms of patient survival. These combination treatments are preferential because chemotherapy alone is a broad treatment that targets and kills the rapidly dividing cells in the body, many of which may not be cancerous. In contrast, adding stem cell therapy to the use of chemotherapy and maintenance therapy utilizes a targeted approach to treat the cells that are causing damage to the blood system. Further research is needed in order to apply this therapy to other diseases, but there is a potential benefit to utilizing these cells in other treatments.

Stephen G Alterado (2014, P): Price 1st Floor Hallway@3:00 PM

Title: Effects of Goal Setting and Public Posting on Sport Skills: A Meta-Analysis
Major(s): Exercise Science
Advisor(s): Alstot
Abstract: Applied behavior analysis (ABA) techniques have been used to improve an abundance of behaviors in a variety of settings with many populations. ABA interventions, including public posting and goal setting, specifically implemented in physical activity settings, have shown to be a positive influence on improving athletic performance. Purpose: Although a variety of research exists in this area, we do not know the overall effect. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to utilize meta-analysis techniques to determine the overall effect of goal setting and public posting on performance of sports skills as well as the influence moderator variables had on this overall effect. Method: Several electronic databases and reference lists of identified studies were searched to identify research that matched our inclusion criteria: (1) studies that utilized public posting, goal setting and/or both as the intervention; (2) studies that were conducted in any type of physical activity setting (i.e., physical education, athletics, etc); (3) a dependent variable that was a type of physical activity behavior; and (4) research designs that utilized a single-subject methodology. Studies that did not fit all of these criteria were excluded from the meta-analysis. Once studies were identified for inclusion, moderator variable information and quantitative baseline and intervention data were extracted and used to calculate effect sizes (ES). Data Analysis: The standardized mean difference (SMD) formula was used to calculate each ESSMD. The weighted mean ES and moderator analyses were conducted using Comprehensive Meta-Analysis software. Results and Conclusions: Will be discussed on Senior Projects Day.

Austin Alvarez (2014, T): Berglund 200@4:30 PM

Title: Sense to Dollars – Investing in Penny Stocks
Major(s): Business
Advisor(s): Dong
Abstract: This project experiments with different investing methods on how to best select a penny stock that will experience a positive return. There are many aspects that come into play pertaining to penny stocks, all of which will be technically analyzed and assessed to a certain degree of risk and reward. This project will entail numerous tips and guides, along with do's and don'ts personally experienced within the penny stock-investing world. Amongst the tips and guides will be a personally developed investing strategy to achieve success within this difficult market. The goal for this project is to realize a positive return from your investment and to be able to distinguish a prospering stock from an exaggerated one.

Jesse Amano (2012, T): Strain 121@8:30 AM

Title: BLAISE: A Pascal to Java Bytecode Compiler
Major(s): Computer Science
Advisor(s): Khoja
Abstract: Pascal is a popular language for new programmers because its features enforce straightforward design practices while still leaving room for powerful procedural programming tools. These same features also make Pascal an ideal language for an amateur compiler: the language follows a strict structure, but is nuanced enough to make the task of building a Pascal compiler nontrivial. Blaise is such a compiler; it reads code written in ISO Pascal and outputs equivalent code in Java Bytecode. I chose Java Bytecode because it can be interpreted on almost any platform, and because its instruction set comes with its own unique constraints and challenges. In the process of building Blaise, I find parallels between Java and Pascal that are hidden from the typical programmer. In addition to compiling ISO Pascal, Blaise can automatically optimize a program for speed and memory usage by unraveling loops, short-circuiting, eliminating "dead" code, and minimizing its use of temporary variables.

Jesse Amano (2012, T): Strain 121@1:00 PM

Title: Connecting Block Designs and Matroids
Major(s): Mathematics

Advisor(s): Neudauer
Abstract: Block designs, abstract structures with applications in experiment control and data gathering, have in many cases been shown to be isomorphic to matroids, another broad family of abstract structures. We explore and discuss some of the ways a specific class of designs can also describe a matroid, and some of the ways a specific type of matroid may also constitute a design. We also consider cases where a matroid exists but not a design, and where a design exists but not a matroid. Because certain algorithms are known to produce or manipulate matroids, these may be useful in constructing certain types of designs. Meanwhile, careful study of designs may lead to useful theorems that apply to matroids.

Amy Amberger (2009, T): Marsh 106@2:00 PM

Title: Exodus 1947: Jewish Resettlement, British Colonialism, and the Struggle for Palestine
Major(s): History
Advisor(s): Szefel
Abstract: My thesis analyzes the flood of Jews out of Europe and into Palestine after World War Two. I use the experience of refugees on the ship Exodus 1947 to highlight the role of Jewish pressure groups on media around the world. This event influenced future British policy both toward Jews in the postwar period and toward their strategy in Palestine. This ship is among the most famous and most important of the vessels used by European Jews to immigrate to their new homeland. Not only did the British turn it away, they sent its passengers back to Germany, rather than to detention camps in Cyprus. I analyze sources from the British Foreign Office, Anglo and American newspapers, as well as sources from the American Foreign Office in order to argue that the publicity surrounding the Exodus affair brought the plight of the Jewish people’s fight for a homeland into the world’s eye, and contributed to Britain’s departure and the eventual founding of the State of Israel.

Isaac Ambruso (2014, T): Berglund 145@8:00 AM

Title: Positional Politics of the United States Senate: The SALT II Treaty Ratification Debate
Major(s): Politics and Government
Advisor(s): Moore
Abstract: Many scholars have shown that the president and his staff are not the only important political players when it comes to foreign policy. The Senate in particular has significant on influence over the outcomes of foreign policy initiatives. Unfortunately, while there is a great deal of research showing that the senate has influence, there is a surprising lack on analysis on which positions within the Senate exert the most influence on policy initiatives. This paper remedies that lack of analysis by using the SALT II treaty as a case study to conduct a process tracing analysis. I analyze the exact ways in which key positions exerted influence over the ratification process and what dimension of power they used in order to change policy outcomes. I found that the chairs of foreign relations, armed services, and the intelligence committees have the greatest influence on the process through the control of information and by making the case for policy preferences directly to the public and thus influencing the political feasibility of supporting a policy preference. To a lesser extent the majority and minority leaders can provide political cover to party members due to their public visibility and by helping to set the party line of a specific policy initiative. Finally expert senators, even if they do not sit on these committees, can change policy outcomes because other senators will often defer to their expert knowledge.

Kerstin Amezcua (2013, T): Berglund 232@9:30 AM

Title: Selective reductions using sodium borohydride as a convenient source of hydrogen
Major(s): Chemistry

Advisor(s): Cordes
Abstract: Sodium borohydride is a versatile reducing reagent. On its own, it rapidly reduces carbonyl groups, but in combination with a heterogeneous palladium catalyst, acetic acid, and a non-polar solvent, sodium borohydride selectively reduces the carbon-carbon double bonds of α,β-unsaturated carbonyl ketones and other similar compounds. A survey study was conducted to compare this method to the traditional hydrogenation method which requires an external source of hydrogen gas and a high pressure reactor such as a Parr Hydrogenator. A third method, utilizing only sodium borohydride, was used as a point of comparison to demonstrate how our method successfully reverses the ordinary chemoselectivity of sodium borohydride.

Bryanna Amoroso (2012, P): Strain Hall 2nd Floor@1:00 PM

Title: How do in utero and neonatal exposure to bisphenol A affect the development of the reproductive organs and mammary glands of mammals?
Major(s): Biology
Advisor(s): Bricker
Abstract: Bisphenol A (BPA) is a synthetic chemical that hardens polycarbonate plastics and epoxy resins, such as plastic food containers or metal cans lined with epoxy glue. BPA leeches onto substance it come into contact with including food and beverages. Researchers found that 95% of adults in the United States have detectable bisphenol A in their urine (Wetherhill et al 2006). It's a xenoestrogen that can hypomethylate DNA and change cell receptors and their cellular response. Therefore, this endocrine disruptor is harmful during developmental periods, like gestation periods in pregnancy, because of its epigenetic effects. BPA can enhance estrogen build up in reproductive organs, increase cell proliferation and decrease apoptosis in mammary glands, and speed up mammary gland development. This synthetic chemical is harmful to offspring of women who are exposed to bisphenol A.

Caitey Andersen (2008, T): Marsh 106@4:30 PM

Title: Land, River, Blood, and People: Contemporary Life Histories along the Big River
Major(s): Anthropology
Advisor(s): Mahar


Abstract: “This is our home. That river, it’s like it flows through our blood.” These are the words of the current chief of the Celilo Native American Village, and they express the importance of human identity with regard to landscape. This project explores the anthropological connections between culture and nature, and the ways in which the landscape of the Columbia River has shaped both communal and personal sense of identity within the village. The research includes more than five years of ethnographic experience and focuses on the life histories of four village elders. The life and oral histories of these people offer an anchor in an otherwise shifting landscape – as the Columbia has faced serious devastation due to industrial development. Each change to the Columbia River results in a change to the Celilo Village. This study is an example of the symbiotic relationship between nature and culture and highlights the importance of research in the combined fields of Native American Studies and Environmental Anthropology.

Ashley Anderson (2009, T): Marsh 101@2:30 PM

Title: A Psychobiographical Analysis of Ted Kaczynski, the "Unabomber"
Major(s): Psychology
Advisor(s): Schultz
Abstract: Ted Kaczynski, the so-called Unabomber, is one of the more notorious killers of the late 20th century.  He mailed or placed bombs, often at universities or technology-related businesses; in all, he killed 3 people and injured over 20.  In the midst of his killing spree, which spanned roughly 18 years, he also published a manifesto in the Washington Post titled "Industrial Society and its Future."  This project explores the psychological needs behind Kaczynski's ideas and behavior, with a special emphasis on the deeper psychological motives fueling the "Manifesto" itself.

Jade Anderson (2011, T): Berglund 200@4:00 PM

Title: Identity versus Desire:The Act of Self-Fashioning in Marlowe's Hero and Leander
Major(s): English: Literature
Advisor(s): Browning
Abstract: During the sixteenth-century English Renaissance, there was a belief that multiple selves could exist and a sense that these selves could be fashioned. Stephen Greenblatt, a New Historicist critic, utilizes the influences of culture and literary background to formulate his critical theory of self-fashioning. The idea of fashioning new identities became associated with an artful and malleable process by which authors and characters could achieve a different mode of behavior. In Christopher Marlowe's Hero and Leander, the two protagonists struggle to reinvent themselves in order to allow for the consummation of their mutual passion, since their primary identities conflict with their flourishing desires. Initially Hero, a virgin priestess to Venus, and Leander, an inexperienced youth, disdain the act of sex. In the course of refashioning, Hero examines her vow of chastity and Leander his preconceptions about sexual desire. This thesis analyzes the internal and external forces that Hero and Leander must reckon with and transform to satisfy their desires.

Brittney Anderson (2012, T): Price 204@8:30 AM

Title: The Relationship between Burnout and Perfectionism with the Influence of Academic Motivation in NCAA Division III Athletes
Major(s): Exercise Science
Advisor(s): Concepcion
Abstract: Burnout can be described as a psychological, emotional, and physical withdrawal from sport due to chronic stress (Smith, 1986). In the Investment Model of Burnout, Raedeke (1997) suggests that there are five determinants of commitment to an individual continuing their activity. The five determinants are rewards, costs, satisfaction, investment, and alternatives. Depending on the situation presented to the individual, they will either feel a sense of enjoyment or a sense of entrapment. This enjoyment leads to the individual continuing their activity, while entrapment can lead to them withdrawing from it. There have been multiple studies conducted to investigate the relationship between burnout and perfectionism (Hill et al, 2008; Appleton, Hall, & Hill, 2009; Chen et al, 2008). However, there is little research on how an athlete's academic motivation influences this relationship between burnout and perfectionism, which may be a significant factor for DIII athletes who may have significant pressures to perform well in academics. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to gain a better understanding of the relationship between burnout and perfectionism (academic, athletic, or general) with the influence of academic motivation in NCAA Division III college athletes. The results of this study may provide more information on burnout antecedents to help recognize and decrease the number of athletes who develop burnout symptoms. Methods: The participant population was NCAA Division III college athletes who are eighteen years of age or older. Participants were required to: (a) complete a demographic questionnaire, (b) complete the Athlete Burnout Questionnaire (Raedeke & Smith, 2001), (c) complete the Frost Multidimensional Perfectionism Scale (Frost, Marten, Lahart, & Rosenblate, 1990), complete the Sport Perfectionism Scale (Araki, 2004), and (e) complete the Academic Motivation Scale-College (Vallerand, 1992). A regression analysis was conducted using SPSS. Results: The results from the regression analyses indicated that general perfectionism and academic motivation were not significant predictors of burnout. However, sport perfectionism was found to be a predictor of two burnout subscales; reduced sense of accomplishment and devaluation.

Tyler Andre (2009, T): Taylor Auditorium: Marsh 216@2:30 PM

Title: Printmaking: Past to Present
Major(s): Art
Advisor(s): O'Day
Abstract: Being the only printmaker in the senior exhibit I take great pride in sharing the process and art contained in Printmaking. As an artist I express the way I feel, what I see and how I interpret situations through my prints. Recently I have focused on reminiscing. My latest work is a compilation of travels, experiences, dreams, and emotions. I have been able to explore both myself as an individual and as an artist through my experiences. Whether it be the loss of a loved one, the enlightenment of a new best friend, or a new favorite spot on the planet, I relay the moments, people, places and emotions through my prints.

Timothy Andrew (2010, T): Berglund 232@4:00 PM

Title: City of Cornelius Rebranding Project ? The Survey
Major(s): Business Administration
Advisor(s): Griffie
Abstract: We worked with city planners for the city of Cornelius to kick start their re-branding efforts. We developed and distributed surveys that catered to what we found to be a diverse community of residents and business owners throughout Cornelius who are invested in the future of the city. The focus of the survey was to gain an understanding of the current public perception about the city and how they envision future progress. We aimed to produce sound, reflective data with the intention to help the city planners go forth in the process where they will decide the direction of the city.

Hilary Andrews-Bryant (2010, T): Price 202@4:00 PM

Title: The Effects of Focus of Attention and Task Objective Direction Consistency on the Learning of a Novel Task
Major(s): Exercise Science
Advisor(s): Jackson
Abstract: Until recently, studies have shown that an external focus of attention results in increased performance accuracy and task acquisition. However, in most of these studies, the objective of the assigned task has been arguably external, providing consistency only for those in the external condition (external focus/external objective). Purpose: The current study examines the effects of task focus and objective consistency on the acquisition of a novel motor task. Methods: Extending methods of previous focus of attention studies, participants were divided into 4 groups based on focus of attention and task objective direction (external/external, external/internal, internal/external, internal/internal). Participants performed 80 golf chip shots in acquisition, followed by 30 retention shots conducted on the following day. Analyses: The data was analyzed with a repeated measure ANOVA to determine group differences over time. Results: The results demonstrate an advantage for an external focus of attention when the task objective is also external. However, this advantage was not found when the task had an internal objective. Conclusion: These results suggest that when a task is performed with an external objective, an external focus is more advantageous. However, when using an internal objective, both directions of focus seem to be equally effective. It is suggested that future research examine the effects of learner preference of the focus of attention direction when the task objective is internal.

LeMar Anglin (2012, T): Price 202@9:30 AM

Title: Independent Assessment of a Basketball Shoe with a Customizable Modular Midsole
Major(s): Exercise Science
Advisor(s): Schot
Abstract: The design and evaluation of performance enhancement and injury prevention features of footwear is of great interest in biomechanics. Most research has focused on midsole designs to prevent injuries among runners. Much less attention has been given to midsole properties in basketball footwear. The remarkably dynamic sprinting, maneuvering and jumping demonstrated in basketball performances expose players to potentially injurious stresses. Players at different positions face these demands in different proportions; however basketball shoe designs are fundamentally generic. A new basketball model takes a modular approach to midsole construction and includes two versions with each purchase. One is targeted upon needs of players who emphasize horizontal motion (sprinting, maneuverability) and the other aims at those who accentuate dramatic vertical motion (jumping, landing) in play. Purpose: To examine the effects of two midsole modules across various functional athletic tests that emphasized posture control, agility, power and shock absorption. Methods: 24 subjects completed five tests over two non-consecutive days wearing each midsole and a generic lab (volleyball) shoe as a control. The first session consisted of an integrated slalom and straight running speed test. The second session included bipedal vertical jump, single-leg landing from 45cm, and single-leg stance on a dynamic surface tests. Performance measures from each task were analyzed via repeated measures ANOVA (α=.05). Results: Results will be discussed at the time of presentation.

Sarah Aoki (2010, T): Price 202@2:00 PM

Title: Music, Mind & Body: Can Music Benefit Physical Performance Beyond that of an Auditory Distraction?
Major(s): Exercise Science
Advisor(s): Jackson
Abstract: Music has been found to produce powerful effects in a number of areas of performance. Researchers have examined the utilization of music in various settings (e.g., healthcare and fitness facilities) and discovered that the unique interaction between musical elements such as pitch, volume, rhythm, and tempo can elicit various physiological and psychological responses (e.g., Brownely et al., 1995; Bruner, 1990). It has been proposed that music benefits performance as a “passive distracter” (Dyrlund & Wininger, 2008; Potteiger et al., 2000; Priest & Karageorghis, 2008), defined as an element that is able to divert ones attention away from its current state of mind. What is not known is whether music can affect physical performance beyond that of passive distraction, and to what extent. Purpose: The essential purpose of this study is to further examine whether music produces differential effects on physical performance than just an auditory distracter. Methods: Each participant conducted three isometric pulls while in each of three conditions: listening to music, listening to an audio book (distracter), and with no sound at all. The objective for this task was to sustain a pull at 50% of their maximal effort for as long as possible. Results: Overall, performance was greater when listening to music than when listening to an audio book (t52=4.171, p=.000) or no sound (t52= 4.668, p=.000). Participants performed the same when listening to no music or an audio book (t52= -.885, p=.380). Gender illustrated to have an interestingly affect on performance. Males and females performed best during the music condition, however a significantly lower performance during the no sound and audio book was found in males only. Conclusion: Results of this study indicate that music can enhance physical performance beyond that of a passive distracter, and that these effects may be strongest in males. More research is needed to determine whether these effects are displayed when more effective distracters are used, and to explain the differential effects found in males and females.

Juno Ann Apalla (2011, T): Taylor Auditorium: Marsh 216@2:30 PM

Title: A Collaboration for the Avant-garde and Experimental
Major(s): Media Arts: Film and Theater
Advisor(s): Hardacker
Margolis
Vaisburd
Abstract: This project combines two artistic mediums, film and theatre, in a video installation performance art piece. I am using dialogue from Doctor Faustus Lights the Lights by Gertrude Stein, and techniques developed by Bertolt Brecht in his Epic Theatre. I was drawn to the dialectical process of creating experimental films and live performances, so my approach is to experiment with how I can use different elements of video and theatre production to interpret Gertrude Stein's text, while maintaining Bertolt Brecht's technique Verfremdungseffekt, the alienation effect. Also incorporated in the style of the show is a new genre, Steampunk. The challenges are: 1) Coordinating a full production that orchestrates several people with various talents, and 2) Pulling from available resources from the film, theatre, and music departments. The result is a critical collaboration with several artists, including the hard work of my film crew; original musical compositions by Ben España, and Kristen Seifer; choreography by Anika Tobaison; and costume designs by Adriana "Coco" Kapfer, and Tori Galiel. The video and theatrical performance will work in tandem with Shane Kawiatkowski's senior performance on Sat. April 30 at 2:00 PM, and Sun. May 1, 2011 at 11:30 AM and 7:30 PM in the Taylor Meade Performing Art Center, free admission to anyone and everyone.

Cody-John Apana (2013, T): Price 203@8:30 AM

Title: Bacteriophage Treatment as a Possible Replacement Treatment for Antibiotics
Major(s): Biology
Advisor(s): Nyerges
Abstract: Bacteriophages (phages) are viruses that infect and take total control of the biosynthetic machinery of specific bacteria that they code for in order to replicate (USC School of Medicine 2010). Bacteriophage (phage) therapy is the idea of utilizing these bacteriophages to identify, treat, and cure harmful infectious diseases that possibly our conventional methods can't. Antibiotic resistance is becoming an increasingly prevalent problem today. Antibiotic resistance is where bacteria have mutated in such a way that antibiotics that use to harm them either don't, or aren't quite as effective as before. Currently we're beginning to see more applications of phage therapy on bacteria that are specifically antibiotic resistant. The objective of this review of articles is to assess the idea if bacteriophage (phage) therapy could be a quality replacement or supplement treatment to antibiotics. More specifically, can phage therapy be successfully utilized to effectively treat multi-drug resistant bacteria that cause harmful diseases/infections today? From the literature collected and examined, bacteriophage therapy seems to be either the best replacement for antibiotic therapy, or the best supplement to antibiotic therapy we have presently. Weber-Dabowska et al. (2000) targeted the diseases that are caused by antibiotic resistant bacteria and have shown that phage therapy had significant results with most of the patients making a full recovery. For future studies, bacteriophage therapy needs to be introduced and done on clinical trials for it to gain any traction. The studies done in Poland shows that phage therapy can work without significantly harmful side effects.

Kristen Apana (2014, P): Strain Hall 3rd Floor@3:00 PM

Title: The effect of epigenetic modification on E. coli and how it contributes to pathogenicity
Major(s): Biology
Advisor(s): Sardinia
Abstract: In the United States alone, at least two million people are victims of bacterial infection resulting in about 23, 000 deaths. One mode of bacterial infection is through epigenetics, which is the alteration of a chromosome without a change in DNA sequence that can result in a heritable phenotype. Thus, epigenetics and pathogenic bacteria form a lethal combination by creating many phenomena, one being antibiotic resistance. This study focused on Escherichia coli (E. coli), which is a prominent strain of bacteria that lives in the intestines of animals, and is disseminated through water and food. Though not all E. coli are harmful, some can be severely pathogenic. The key question for this study was: How does E. coli virulence intensify through epigenetic modification. Through an analysis of several previous studies, I found that E. coli has the ability to increase toxin production and undergo phenotypic differentiation in response to the presence of stressor foreign substances, such as antibiotics.

Gonzalo Aquino (2007, T): Marsh 201@11:00 AM

Title: Zapotec Identity: Archeological Symbolism in Artistic Mesoamerican Textiles and Its Representation Among Zapotec Natives
Major(s): Anthropology
Advisor(s): Mahar


Abstract: Oaxaca is considered one of the most culturally diverse states in Mexico. The incised figures found on steles, monuments, and sanctuaries are part of this symbolic text visible in Oaxaca's archeology. The first section of this investigation focuses on the concept of identity. Also by analyzing archeological symbolism and the text these symbols represent, this project will reveal the identity traits linked to the textiles Oaxacan artisans produce. Another important segment of this investigation analyzes the symbols implemented in these textiles. The symbolic representations of ancient characters are the most fundamental social processes among the Zapotec culture in Oaxaca. Such ancient symbols encompass the origin of Zapotec creativity; they also reveal the talent and skill that Zapotec artists apply to several ancient crafts. The last segment of this investigation evaluates and interprets what these ancient symbolic features continue to represent for Zapotec communities in Oaxaca, Mexico.

Lenin Aquino (2008, T): Marsh 206@8:30 AM

Title: The Complexity of Immigration Reform: The 1986 Immigration and Reform Act and the 2007 Immigration Reform Act
Major(s): Politics and Government
Advisor(s): Seward


Abstract: The prime focus of this research looks at two major immigration policies: The 1986 Immigration and Reform Act (irca) and the Secure Borders, Economic Opportunity and Immigration Reform Act of 2007. Both of these pieces of legislation dealt with the problem of illegal immigration into the US. Each reform was undertaken, and despite the 20-year gap, both policies display a homogeneous relationship. Both had a Republican president, a Congress controlled by Democrats, and faced illegal immigration primarily from Mexico. Despite their similarities, the two outcomes would be very different. The 1986 IRCA resulted in pro-immigrant legislation, while the 2007 Immigration Reform Act provoked a strong anti-immigrant backlash. The thesis attempts to explain the different results and suggests a model for comparable outcomes in the future.

Michael Arakaki (2013, T): Price 1st Floor Hallway@1:00 PM

Title: The relationships among stress, personal resources, burnout, and injury among collegiate athletes
Major(s): Exercise Science
Advisor(s): Faulk
Abstract: Stress has been associated with both burnout, which can lead to withdrawal from a formerly enjoyable sport, and injury in collegiate athletes. However, personal resources such as mental toughness, positivity, and social support may provide a psychological edge that allows an athlete to persevere through difficult situations and emerge successful, thus protecting athletes from burnout and injury. Purpose: To explore the ability of personal resources to protect collegiate athletes against burnout and injury. Methods: Collegiate athletes (n ~ 100) completed an anonymous online survey using SurveyGizmo. Participants responded to items that assessed their levels of stress, personal resources (mental toughness, positivity, and social support), and burnout, as well as their injury history. Analysis: The direct and interactive effects of stress and personal resources on burnout were assessed using multiple regression analysis, while the effects of stress and personal resources on injury were assessed using logistic regression. All analyses were performed using SPSS software. Results: The results of this study will be discussed at the time of presentation.

Cory Arashiro (2011, T): Berglund 232@9:00 AM

Title: All About Writing Conferences: An in-depth examination of how the environment, emotions, and expectations affect teacher talk
Major(s): Education
Advisor(s): Phillips
Abstract: How does the environment in conjunction with personal emotions and expectations of the students influence writing conferences as well as teacher talk? This is the question guiding the self-study research completed by four teacher-researchers. Our teacher-research team spent six weeks conducting writing conferences with students in a kindergarten classroom and a 4-6th grade classroom. We audio-recorded each session to analyze our teacher talk in a conference setting and collected field notes and artifacts from the students. We reviewed, discussed, questioned, and analyzed our findings in addition to producing two analytic memos. The teacher-student writing conference is more than just a skill to learn and implement; it is complicated with many facets. Through analyzing the environment, emotions, and expectations, we found that conducting writing conferences is a unique journey in becoming teachers.

Mariah Ariola (2014, T): Marsh 101@1:30 PM

Title: Manipulative, Submissive, and Goddess-like:An Examination of Michael Jackson's Female Representations
Major(s): Psychology
Advisor(s): Schultz
Abstract: This psychobiography aims to better understand the life of the legendary Michael Jackson. Jackson's music career began at the age of eight. Since then and up until his death in 2009, he composed a variety of award-winning songs, many of which focus on females. After further investigation of his female-related lyrical content, three main female personifications became apparent: manipulative, submissive, and goddess-like. To explain Jackson's motivation behind these female characterizations, attachment theory is used to examine his early life, primary relationships, and how these relationships led to specific attachment strategies and specific expectations in relation to women, real and fictional.

Adam Armstrong (2014, T): Price 214@9:30 AM

Title: Civil War, Modernity and Railroads
Major(s): History
Advisor(s): Lipin
Abstract: The Civil War marked the beginning of a modern warfare that was not seen before in the United States. This was the first war where the railroads were used and its importance was exploited on a major scale. The significance of upkeep and constant addition of rail lines became a major factor to the war effort in both the north and the south. The more industrial north was able to adapt and expand their railroad holdings. On the other side, the south was constantly behind in their quest to be successful on the railroads. The south was developing a culture that did not embrace industrialism. Their society did not revolve as much around new technologies and advancements in society. It was more focused around a simple lifestyle that landowners were used to and were not as willing to change. The railroads brought about a new factor that the south had to learn how to utilize. This problem was seen throughout the war years, and in the big picture, was a major factor to their overall destruction. Since the north was able to adapt with the ever changing world around them, they were able to constantly have an advantage when it came to the railroads. In the end, the south was unable to adapt to modernity and therefore were constantly fighting an uphill battle.

Brooke Arndt (2010, T): Price 204@8:30 AM

Title: The Role Of The Wnt Gene In Tissue Regeneration
Major(s): Biology
Advisor(s): Baugher
Abstract: There has been a recent establishment of the important role of Wnt gene interactions in tissue regeneration. Canonical and noncanonical Wnt genes work antagonistically to allow proper growth and development of regenerated tissues and appendages. Canonical Wnt proteins interact with b-catenin to affect intercellular process such as gene transcription, while noncanonical Wnt proteins skip the interaction with b-catenin when activating gene transcription. Many noncanonical Wnt proteins are only present during development and regenerative stages of growth, highlighting the importance of noncanonical Wnt gene expression at these stages. Activation of Wnt-5a, a noncanonical Wnt gene, has been shown to control cell differentiation during late stages of tissue and limb regeneration by counteracting the ability of canonical Wnt genes to suppress differentiation. This function highlights the importance of noncanonical Wnt genes in tissue and limb regeneration. Understanding the role of noncanonical Wnt signaling is important for their potential medicinal use in tissue and appendage regeneration.

Karyn Arnold (2009, T): Berglund 200@3:00 PM

Title: La Musique Française: The Impacts of History and Culture on French Music Since 1900
Major(s): World Languages: French
Advisor(s): de Larquier
Abstract: Based on a representative sample of popular songs from France, this thesis explores the impacts of history and culture on French music from the 1900s onwards, as well as the ways in which French songs play a key role in representing the views of its people. By analyzing these songs in their historical context we will gain insight to the French culture and its people as a whole. The time period studied includes major world and French affairs ranging from the First and Second World Wars, to the reconstruction of Europe, the student revolts in Paris in May 1968, September 11th, and the current economic crisis, among many others. This thesis is written in French, as is most sources of research. Research will be taken from authentic sources from various French history text books, newspapers, and music websites, to name but a few. Subsequently, this thesis will challenge the general views of music as mere entertainment, in particular as it applies to French popular music. We will find that lyrics of popular songs in France, however poetic, are often highly political, at times vindictive and rebellious, mostly because French audiences expect them to convey a message of their own.

Samuel Arriola (2012, T): Price 214@10:00 AM

Title: The Quantification of State of Charge in Nickel Electrodes by Gas Chromatography
Major(s): Chemistry
Advisor(s): Whiteley
Abstract: This project is a continuation of work begun by Anariros Meletis and Crystal Defusco. It is an exploration of the feasibility of using gas chromatography to measure the residual capacity in nickel electrodes which are used in Nickel-Hydrogen and Nickel-Cadmium batteries. The residual capacity exists as NiOOH and can selectively oxidize primary alcohols to aldehydes. Because these alcohols and aldehydes are volatile, they lend themselves to quantification by gas chromatography. The work entails the selection of a quickly and quantitatively oxidized alcohol and a suitable solvent for the reaction. The goal is to develop a technique that can quickly measure the amount of NiOOH in less than 100 mg of electrode material from the aldehyde to alcohol ratio after the sample is treated with a primary alcohol.

Kevin Arrowsmith (2013, T): Taylor Auditorium: Marsh 216@4:30 PM

Title: How ESPN Changed Local Sports Broadcasting
Major(s): Media Arts: Journalism
Advisor(s): Cassady
Abstract: With the rise in popularity of the sports network ESPN, the way viewers consume sports has drastically changed. Prior to the arrival of ESPN, viewers relied heavily on local broadcasters for their sports news. As viewers paid more attention to the national network, local broadcasters had to find a way to stay relevant. Local broadcasters realized they couldn't compete head to head with the likes of ESPN, so they decided to shift their focus in coverage. Local TV and radio stations have also downsized its personnel devoted to covering sports, and sports personalities are becoming less relevant than they used to be, but there is still very much of a demand for coverage of local sports. To meet that demand, local broadcasters have taken on more responsibilities, and have had to do more with less to bring viewers news about sports.

Alexandra Arroyo (2013, T): Berglund 232@2:00 PM

Title: "Learning through Creative Artistic Expression" The Benefits of Art in Education
Major(s): FG. Education and Learning
Advisor(s): Zijdemans Boudreau
Abstract: How does art help initiate the motivation to learn, support developmental growth, and aid students in thinking critically? The researchers referred to over thirty articles written on art education to help explore this question. The researchers then spent seven weeks conducting over thirty-six hours of observations in the atelier at the Early Learning Community with two different preschool classes. Researchers collected both audio and visual artifacts of the students' artwork, took detailed field-notes, developed a five-question, qualitative and quantitative, survey for forty parents, and created a ten-question, qualitative and quantitative, survey for the six teachers and one director. Their data was analyzed through comparison and trustworthy checks in weekly group meetings. The following themes emerged: 1) Art does help students with the motivation to learn, developmental growth, and critical thinking; 2) The majority of parents of ELC students strongly agree that art is an important aspect in education; and 3) The teachers in the ELC try to connect art to classroom learning as often as they can. These outcomes suggest that the framework of the Early Learning Community, which integrates the culture of Reggio Emilia, Montessori, and Waldorf educational approaches, is conducive to supporting engagement in the arts.

Brian Art (2011, T): Marsh 206@11:30 AM

Title: Enabling Unelectable Clowns on the Public Dime?:Campaign Finance Reform in Portland, Oregon
Major(s): Politics and Government
Advisor(s): Boykoff
Abstract: The Voter-Owned Elections system in Portland, Oregon provided funding to candidates for City offices who agreed to limit spending and who raised a specified number of $5 contributions. After five years, in 2010, voters opposed a measure that would have continued the program. Both its passage and its defeat can be explained using John Kingdon's model of policy analysis. Passage came as the result of the opening of policy windows of high levels of fundraising, and resulting perception of problems, as well as the elected officeholders at that time. Portland voters ended the program in November 2010. The program's end was influenced by a poor economy. In addition, a campaign fund-raiser fraudulently obtained the public funds for several candidates. Finally, questions were raised about whether the program was unfairly subsidizing campaigns, with only two candidates elected and no incumbents replaced over five years.

Jacob Artz (2009, T): Price 204@2:00 PM

Title: Arranging Dominoes and Squares: What?s Math Got to Do with It?
Major(s): Mathematics
Advisor(s): Rowell
Abstract: While arranging dominoes and squares in different patterns is not necessarily esoteric in nature, its application in mathematics is. We examine a specific way in which squares and dominoes are used, namely through tiling. We begin with a brief examination of the Fibonacci sequence and its combinatorial representation. We show that the number of ways to arrange dominoes and squares on an n-length board is equal to the nth Fibonacci number. From this basic relationship we determine a number of identities involving Fibonacci numbers and strategies to find these identities. Some methods we use are breaking an n-length board into different portions, considering the position of a specific tile, and ?nding correspondences between two sets of tilings. We also explore Zeckendorf ’s Theorem and its application to combinatorics and specifically tiling. This allows us to produce an explicit definition for some Zeckendorf family identities.

Natasha Arzaga-Kaio (2014, T): Berglund 216@3:00 PM

Title: Clay & Play in the Atelier
Major(s): Education
Advisor(s): Phillips
Abstract: The intent of our capstone project was to research how clay specifically works as a medium to elicit language development, expand problem-solving techniques, practice creative outlooks, and allow young children to engage in reasoning and sequencing. Our research occurred over an eight-week period in two Early Learning Community classrooms (preschool and kindergarten) at Pacific University. We collected: observational field notes, pictures and video documentations, interviews from teachers, and literary artifacts. To analyze the data effectively we made multiple connections to answer the question: "How does teacher scaffolding during clay and play extend or expand classroom learning?" Through this process we learned that clay has a significant impact on early childhood education and children's ability to expand on multiple developments.

Youstina Atalla (2013, T): Price 1st Floor Hallway@1:00 PM

Title: Anterior cruciate ligament injury reconstruction and return to sport: A meta-analytic review
Major(s): Exercise Science
Advisor(s): Faulk
Abstract:  Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tears are the most common knee injuries in athletes, with nearly 120,000 athletes in the United States affected by ACL injuries every year. ACL reconstruction surgery continues to be the preferred treatment for athletes with an ACL tear. Although this is the leading treatment for this type of knee injury, less than half of athletes who undergo this procedure are able to return to their sport within one year. Purpose: To perform a meta-analysis based on existing published literature to (1) determine the existence, direction, and magnitude of the association between ACL reconstruction and return to sport; and (2) identify other study and/or sample characteristics that may influence the association between ACL reconstruction and return to sport. Methods: Studies were selected based on Internet searches of journal databases. To be eligible for inclusion, studies needed to examine the relationship between ACL reconstruction and return to sport. Analysis: Standardized measures of the effect of ACL reconstruction on return to sport were calculated for each study and then synthesized into a single effect size using Comprehensive Meta-Analysis software. Results: The results of this meta-analysis will be discussed at the time of presentation.

Hayley Atkinson (2009, T): Marsh 101@10:30 AM

Title: To Play or Not to Play:Determining the Best Work-Play Balance For School-Aged Children
Major(s): Psychology
Advisor(s): Kleinknecht
Abstract: Play is essential to healthy psychological development. Despite the empirical evidence, many US schools are eliminating recess from the school day. Many elementary teachers utilize discovery learning (DL) techniques in their classes – a method where work is disguised as play. However, it is not clear whether integrating DL into the curriculum makes up for the loss of play resulting from phasing out recess. Obviously, we need to know what the ideal work-play balance is for elementary children though, so that schools may be appropriately organized to maximize student engagement. There are many ways that play can be integrated into the school day, ranging from free play (recess), to work disguised as play (DL), to no play (Direct Instruction; DI). Interviews assessing the validity of this continuum suggest that teachers view DL as a way to integrate play into the classroom, but children consider everything but recess “work.” Though kids may not view DL as play, Speaker (2001) posits that interactive hands-on activities, compared to DI, enable students to learn more from a single activity. Yet, other research unequivocally shows that children who experience DI learn more than children who experience DL. Thus the value of DL as a replacement for play or for DI remains unclear. It is clear though that recess is an essential learning supplement (i.e., and break period) for school-aged-children. However, an empirical investigation of how to best balance DL, DI, and recess in a single study does not yet exist. Similarly, teachers’ expert judgments regarding the ideal work-play balance have not been systematically assessed. The purpose of the present study is to begin determining what the work-play “formula” should be by assessing teachers’ perspectives on the best way to instruct, motivate, and relax students throughout the day. Survey responses are being compared as a function of teacher experience, and of school type (public, charter, private). Results will inform the design of future experiments aimed at assessing the relative contributions of DL, DI, and recess to student success. The results of this research program will help stop the needless elimination of play from school-kids’ day.

Derek Atta (2007, T): Price 214@3:00 PM

Title: The Influence of Local Muscle Fatigue on Walking Economy
Major(s): Exercise Science
Advisor(s): Schot


Abstract: Background: Locomotor economy is an important topic as it is the one of the core components to the quality of life. Biological systems tend naturally to adopt an optimized form of movement to minimize energy expenditure while maximizing work output. There is a biomechanical basis for walking most economically. The force driven harmonic oscillator (FDHO) model represents the legs as physical pendulums. The inertial properties of the leg-pendulum completely determine the resonant oscillation frequency, which is ideal for economy. When experiments require normal, healthy subjects to use this ideal frequency, economy improves. Less is known about how injured or recovering individuals behave in this regard. Mobility maintenance is a critical consideration for the older population and the FDHO model may be a way to improve therapeutic results. Purpose: To create a fatigued/weakened walking environment so as to observe self-optimization tendencies under more challenging conditions. Methods: 20 healthy active younger men and women participated. Anthropometric measures were taken to calculate the ideal walking stride frequency for each subject. A heart rate monitor was used to indirectly measure steady-state metabolic cost. All subjects performed 4 walking tasks at preferred speeds (non-fatigued, preferred frequency; non-fatigued, ideal frequency; fatigued, preferred frequency; fatigued, ideal frequency). The fatigue protocol consisted of 3 sets of leg extensions with 50% percent of their body weight as resistance until muscle failure. The ideal frequency conditions were paced with an electronic metronome. Analysis: Fatigue and frequency effects on select stride and walking economy characteristics were examined using a 2x2 ANOVA.

Jason Tyler Atwood (2009, T): Library Conference@3:00 PM

Title: Who is America? and Other Poems
Major(s): English: Creative Writing
Advisor(s): Pagan
Abstract: This is a creative thesis containing poetry and a critical introduction that situates the creative work in an emerging movement of poetry derived from appropriating lines and lyrics from influences such as John Keats, Buddy Wakefield, Saul Williams, Alicia Cohen, and El-P. For example, the lyrical, alliterative, syllabic rhyming qualities of poet Saul Williams and hip-hop artist El-P inspire poems such as “Darkling Night in Baghdad,” in which the apathy of the USAmerican populace regarding US use of private security forces in foreign wars is discussed. The themes in these poems range from political issues such as neoliberalist economic policies, political prisoners, to the use of private security contractors like Blackwater USA, but also personal themes including loss and love. The title poem “Who is America?,” is a rhythmic assonant free verse in which the narrator attempts to define his role in American society, and the role of USAmerica in global society.

Samantha Auclair (2011, T): Berglund 200@10:00 AM

Title: "Anatomized: A Creative Nonfiction Memoir in Fragmented Form"
Major(s): English: Creative Writing
Advisor(s): Johnson
Abstract: All legitimate stories have a beginning, a middle, and an end-and many writers tell their stories in that order. Sometimes they gravitate beyond this strict structure, perhaps by way of flashbacks or flash-forwards, but rarely do they scrap linearity altogether and write their stories via a collection of fragments. Creative nonfiction, a genre that often relies on memory, is meant to abide by the truth. But how truthful is it to use chronological order for a memoir when memories are remembered in segments and often associated with other memories that are separate from each other in time and space? For my own essay, "Anatomized," chronological order did not seem like an adequate fit for this story-a montage that consists of bits and pieces that are not always linear. These bits and pieces surround my mother's death and are juxtaposed against her autopsy report, in which her body-just like my story-is analyzed via individual pieces. Through both an analysis of the segmented form and a reading from my own work, I hope to explore the boundaries between memory and truth through fractured storytelling.

Aaron-Jay Awa (2011, T): Taylor Auditorium: Marsh 216@3:00 PM

Title: Web Presence for The Farm Store
Major(s): Media Arts: Integrated Media
Advisor(s): Geraci
Abstract: This project establishes a web presence for The Farm Store in Forest Grove, Oregon. The goal of the web site is to promote the store's product lines and to better serve its customers by enhancing their shopping experience. By creating a web presence, I hope to increase the store's revenue stream. To fulfill the project's goals, the site will feature the pets currently for sale and creatively display popular sale items in the store. The site's design is based on customer's impressions of The Farm Store. Central to this impression is the feeling that the Farm Store is local and "homey" - a friendly place to shop. In my presentation, I will discuss the challenges I faced and the creative decisions I made in creating the Farm Store's first web site.

Teresa Ayala (2008, T): Price 203@1:30 PM

Title: Is this the Right Home for Me? An Investigation into what Affects Shell Selection in Hermit Crabs
Major(s): Biology
Advisor(s): Halpern


Abstract: Hermit crabs live in empty mollusk shells that provide them with protection against predators and desiccation. There are many factors that affect the shell a hermit crab selects. The shell must fit correctly. The shell can’t weigh too much for the crab, because the heavier the shell the more energy it takes to move. Thinner shells weigh less, taking less energy to move, but they provide less protection from predators. Smaller shells also weigh less, but they cover less of the hermit crab’s body, lowering its protective capabilities. Previous shell occupancy can have a huge effect on which species of shell will fit better. After a molt, the hermit crab’s soft body conforms to the shell as it hardens, changing the hermit crab’s morphology. These factors combined with environmental stresses and shell availability dictate the shell you will find on a hermit crab. This will be an in-depth study into what causes the hermit crab’s shell selection as it grows

Hannah Ayers (2013, T): Berglund 139@9:00 AM

Title: Australian Vignettes: The Travel Writer's Experience
Major(s): English: Creative Writing
Advisor(s): Johnson
Abstract: The creative portion of this thesis focuses on the writer's study abroad experiences in Australia. The narrator's journey is told through a series of vignettes, which are short scenes that contain snapshot memories and when put together convey a larger idea. These stories show the stages of assimilating into Australian culture the writer went through as well as the meaningful relationships she gained with people in Australia. The critical introduction is centered on the growth of travel writing as a genre and how it has changed to include the writer's emotions and thoughts whereas before it was confined to informational guidebooks.

Shannon Ayers (2014, T): Marsh 201@2:00 PM

Title: Finding a Place at Pacific- An Ethnographic Look at Short Term Exchange Students at Pacific University
Major(s): Anthropology
Advisor(s): Mahar
Abstract: Pacific University has a strong tradition of hosting cultural exchange students from Japan, dating back to Sydney Marsh hosting Nose Sakae in 1853. (Maruki, 2013) Currently about twenty students from Japan study at Pacific University, comprising a small percentage of the student population. These students are traditional exchange students from schools where Pacific has an individual reciprocal relationship. Additionally, Pacific University has an English Language Institute, where short term international students enter to study for TOEFL or GRE examinations. Oberlin University in Tokyo and Pacific University have established a relationship that brings students to Pacific to study English. There is currently a third cohort of approximately twenty students enrolled in this program. The students are participating in this program the focus of this ethnography. These students' experiences at Pacific University consist of only one academic term, but the effects can be profound and far-reaching. Exploring beyond the kawaii peace sign photo-snapping stereotypes, this ethnography attempts to understand the experience of these short-term cultural ambassadors. This research involves observation of two cohort groups and subsequent interviews via email. Diving deeply into the cultural concepts of silence, group consciousness, and high and low context in cultures, this ethnography provides insight into this unique group experience at Pacific University.

Adam Azril (2009, T): Marsh 206@1:00 PM

Title: Gun Lobbies the Strong vs. the Weak: America and Australia
Major(s): Politics and Government
Advisor(s): Boykoff
Abstract: In this thesis I analyze the major differences between the gun lobbies in two similar countries: the United States and Australia. Though similar in styles of government, the pro-gun lobby in the United States is extremely powerful. However, in Australia the anti-gun lobbies have the upper hand in lobbying power. This thesis explores the factors that led to divergent outcomes between the two countries, including the historical cultural traditions of each country and their voting regulations.

Robby Babek (2012, T): Price 202@2:30 PM

Title: Analyzing Physical Activity Levels in Handball Using Heart Rate and Accelerometry
Major(s): Exercise Science
Advisor(s): Henry
Abstract: Background: Existing research suggests that people should obtain 30 minutes or more of moderate to intense physical activity most, if not all, days of the week. There has been a wide variety of research on physical activity in many sports; however, surprisingly little is known about handball. Purpose: The purpose of our study was to use devices (heart rate monitors and accelerometers) to investigate how much energy was expended while playing handball for 30 minutes. Furthermore, the study determined if engaging in handball was an appropriate means to satisfy the 30 minute daily physical activity recommendations. Methods: Participant's height and weight were recorded and the appropriate heart rate monitor chest strap and accelerometer waist strap were fitted. Participants were asked to play 30 minutes of handball against a single opponent. They completed a total of three trials in the span of two weeks with at least one day of rest in between trials. Heart rate and tri-axial accelerometer data, collected at highest continuous sampling frequency allowable, was downloaded via proprietary computer software and analyzed to establish the mean heart rate and energy expenditure associated with playing handball. Results: Results will be presented on Senior Projects Day.

Matthew Bacon (2010, T): Strain 121@4:00 PM

Title: Classifying Nitrogenase Protein Interactions Through Site-Directed Mutagenesis
Major(s): Chemistry
Advisor(s): Chan
Abstract: Nitrogenase is the central enzyme in the reduction of atmospheric nitrogen to ammonia. X-ray crystallography studies have shown two nucleotide binding sites on the iron protein and allowed the in-depth study of interactions between the Fe protein and the MoFe protein of the enzyme. The goal of this research is to determine critical amino acid residues on the iron protein component of nitrogenase from Azotobacter vinelandii necessary for complex formation. By using site-directed mutagenesis, we altered the residues on the iron protein that may be critical for protein docking. Glu68 and neighboring amino acids appear promising because of their close interaction with the MoFe protein and chimera protein studies using C. pasteurianum.

Ben Bagley (2007, T): Library Classroom@1:30 PM

Title: Freeters and Fertility: Socioeconomic Risk in Japan
Major(s): Economics
Advisor(s): Ruder
Ikeda

Abstract: There is a recent tendency in Japan for young workers to lead a working life solely performing part time jobs. This is known as the freeter phenomenon, and along with the falling Japanese birth rate, it is putting a strain on Japan's pension system. This research examines what this means for the future of Japan. After a brief discussion of the social and economic roots of Japan's dwindling fertility rate, and the structure of Japan's aging population, the study will explore the negative effect of the freeter phenomenon on the viability of the Japanese pension system.

Katie Bailey (2007, T): Taylor Auditorium: Marsh 216@11:30 AM

Title: Little Friends, Big Benefits: Facilitation of Social Skills in Kindergarten
Major(s): Psychology
Advisor(s): Burns-Glover


Abstract: The relationship between children's social skills and their ability to form and maintain social networks was explored using a multi-method, multi-measure investigation of kindergartners at a local elementary school. Social skills were measured by multiple observers using a version of a standardized instrument, the Social Skills Checklist (Project Data, University of Washington). Each observer chose two focal children to observe and record for three months in fall 2006 and three months in spring 2007. Behaviors of focal children were recorded during observations on the playground, at lunch and in the classroom. These behaviors included sharing, complimenting, including peers, being able to gain access to a group and sympathizing with others. These friendship patterns were then compared with the measures of social-skills behaviors across a three-month period. The relationship between the Social Skills Checklist (SSC) scores and the sociogram's depiction of friendship was tested by comparing the focal child's level of social competence (on the SSC) with his or her conduct of friendship. Children with high baseline SSC scores appeared to have richer, more complex friendship networks. These results are discussed within the context of emerging research on the importance of social skills in academic competence and school success.

Marcel Bailey (2009, T): Taylor-Meade: Art Division@10:00 AM

Title: Percussion in Ensemble
Major(s): Music Education
Advisor(s): Burch-Pesses
Abstract: My Music Capstone project is a compilation of the multitude of skills I have developed in my years at Pacific University, and will include a percussion ensemble performing one of my original compositions under my direction. This project demonstrates my ability to compose music, teach new instruments to beginning students, and conduct an ensemble in concert. By joining me in this endeavor, non-percussionists have learned the basic techniques needed to perform on various percussion instruments with confidence. The audience will be intrigued by the contrasting styles and the seemingly complex rhythms presented to them by novice percussionists. A short video highlighting some of the preparation that went into the project will be shown, along with an opportunity for the audience to participate in the creation of their own percussion experience.

Lianne Bailey (2011, T): McGill Auditorium@12:00 PM

Title: Water Conservation and Ecological Practices in a Christian Setting
Major(s): Environmental Studies
Advisor(s): Gundersen
Abstract: Water is a scarce, precious resource. In our society, we tend to overuse potable water in our everyday activities. For this project, I worked with the congregation at the Forest Grove United Methodist Church (FGUMC) to construct a rain catchment system that provides their community garden with a source of water other than city drinking water. Some of the goals for this project were: promoting sustainable water usage, growing in community, and promoting environmental awareness in a Christian setting. Members of the FGUMC congregation helped in constructing a simple rain catchment system while building support for additional future projects that promote sustainability and environmental awareness.

Molly Bailey (2011, P): Strain Hall 1st Floor@1:00 PM

Title: Novel CXCR4 antagonist POL3026 inhibits HIV-1 entry into CD4+ T-cells.
Major(s): Biology
Advisor(s): Baugher
Abstract: The Human Immunodeficiency Virus, HIV, affects more that 40 million people worldwide. This virus is known to infect and kill human immune cells, a condition that will eventually result in the fatal illness known as Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS). Although there is currently no cure for this disease, there are several treatments that may improve the quality of life for the patient and slow the progression to AIDS. However, the virus replicates quickly and can develop resistance to any of the pharmaceuticals currently available for treatment. Therefore, the development of novel therapeutics is necessary. HIV enters human cells through receptors present on the cell surface. Once inside, the virus can replicate, multiply, and continue to infect other cells of the immune system. Previous studies have shown that blocking these specific receptors can reduce the entry of the virus into human cells. This current project aims to characterize the possible therapeutic effects of the compound POL3026, an inhibitor of one of these cellular receptors. I hypothesize that POL3026 will block entry of HIV into human cells and inhibit the virus's ability to replicate. It is my hope that POL3026 will represent a new therapeutic for the treatment and management of HIV infection.

Craig Bailey (2014, T): Berglund 200@9:30 AM

Title: Global Football Team Management
Major(s): Business
Advisor(s): Cowing
Abstract: This past year I was selected to compete and represent team U.S.A. in the 16th annual Tazon de Estrellas (Bowl of the Stars) in American Football. For my senior project, I decided to research "behind the scenes" of how the Management of Global Football formulates their recruiting strategies and how Global Football has mastered and improved their global relations. The President and Manager of Global Football LTD, offered me the chance to collect and analyze internal data from the organization. For my project, I describe and evaluate the process of recruiting top players around the country and analyze the involvement and investment of my fellow teammates. Although there is a rich tradition in American Football throughout the world, many are still unaware of the possibilities and opportunities that are out there for players.

Elizabeth Bair (2010, T): Berglund 232@9:00 AM

Title: PTSD- There is Nothing New Under the Sun: Soldiers? Homecoming and Reintegration Experiences Past and Present
Major(s): Social Work
Advisor(s): Schweitzer
Abstract: There is a well-documented history of the combat related trauma responses known today as PTSD. Over two thousand years ago Sophocles describes the debilitating guilt and memories suffered by Greek soldiers of the Trojan War. More recently, U.S. soldiers in the American Civil War spoke of “Soldiers Heart”, in World War I it was referred to as “Shell Shock”, and Vietnam War soldiers knew it as “Combat Stress Reaction”. Studies indicate that early intervention and treatment increase the chance of recovery for a veteran with PTSD and improve quality of life for their families. This project examines how the U.S. government, the Veterans Administration and our society provided care, assistance and treatment to Vietnam Veterans with PTSD, and compare and contrast to the preparations and delivery of services to Veterans currently returning from Iraq and Afghanistan. This presentation will focus on the readiness of the State of Oregon and Washington County to assist veterans presenting with PTSD symptoms. The role of social workers and the community resources available to veterans and families will also be discussed. Findings will benefit local Veterans Services and communities as they plan and implement veterans’ homecoming and reintegration programs for the future.

Eric Baker (2014, T): Price 204@3:00 PM

Title: The Efficacy of Various Firefighting Gloves During Standardized and Simulated Firefighting Tasks
Major(s): Exercise Science
Advisor(s): Henry
Abstract: Firefighting gloves are a necessity on the scene of any fire (the fireground.) While gloves and dexterity have been studied in many fields, the fire service is a profession in which this research is lacking. Purpose: This study investigated the effect of firefighting glove type and glove condition on select measures of grip strength and dexterity. Methods: Using a within-subjects experimental design, thirty college-aged participants completed six measures of dexterity and grip strength, all tests relevant to firefighting. The dependent measures included grip dynamometry, Bennett hand-tool dexterity test, Purdue peg board test, figure 8 knot-tying, hydrant operation, and donning of the gloves. Participants completed the tests with barehand (control condition), with three representative glove types, and with three conditions typically experienced on the fireground (dry gloves, wet gloves, and redried gloves). Repeated measures ANOVA was utilized for statistical analysis. Results & Conclusions: To be presented.

James Baker (2014, T): Marsh 106@8:00 AM

Title: Critical Mass or Critical Miles? Effects On Student Belonging Scores
Major(s): Psychology
Advisor(s): Burns-Glover
Abstract: Students' sense of belonging in the classroom and campus are important predictors of college success. Prior research on homesickness has looked at physical distance as well as "critical mass" theories, which focus on proportion of minority students enrolled as mediators of adjustment to college life. Our data were collected from five academically and demographically similar sections of First Year Seminar at a small, liberal arts college (N=87). We adapted the Sense of Belonging [SOB] measure to create an 18 item scale reflecting "class belonging," "university belonging," "pedagogical caring," and "social acceptance." A "distance" measure was created to identify miles from home, and "critical mass" [CM] categories (0, 1) were created for ethnicity (>10%) and state (>10%) of the student population. Distance from home did not affect the overall SOB score. However, when subscales were analyzed, we found that "Class Belonging" approached significance (r=.17; p=.08) when the other subscales were held constant. Partial correlations for Miles from Home with Pedagogical Caring and Social Acceptance were negative and approached significance. The mean SOB scores for students with critical mass ethnicity was significantly higher (M=69.05, SD=9.0) than non CM ethnicity (M=61.7, SD= 8.49). The effect was significant (F=4.64; p=.035, eta2=.07). Students from CM States scored higher on summed Sense of Belonging (M=69.01; SD=9.19) while students who were not scored lower (M=56.33; SD=6.02). We found partial support for our last hypothesis that a higher degree of involvement in activities on campus would increase a student's SOB. Our results indicated that frequency of attending an "art gallery" was negatively correlated with total belonging (r=-.31), class belonging(r=-.29), social acceptance (r=-.31). Class belonging scores were positively associated with frequency of attending theater and music events (r=.28) and negatively with frequency of attending speakers' presentations (r=-.26). Results are discussed in the context of theories of involvement and engagement.

Bruce Balcita (2014, T): Price 202@3:30 PM

Title: Effect of Resilient Mat Thickness and Fatigue on Reaction Force Characteristics Across a Plyometric Exercise Jump Session.
Major(s): Exercise Science
Advisor(s): Schot
Abstract: Plyometric training (a drop-land-jump sequence) is a widely used and effective method to improve power. However, this exercise results in large, repetitive loadings and is typically performed on surfaces that provide little cushioning; thus, the legs provide all shock absorption. While large forces do elicit training, they also increase injury risk. Strategically regulating these forces is desirable. Numerous products (e.g., shoes, resilient flooring) are marketed for this purpose and testing results are mixed. Also, research on how such equipment influences fatigue is limited. Purpose: To determine how resilient material thickness affects reaction forces across a plyometric series. Methods: 24 participants with plyometric experience completed 3 sessions separated by approximately 1 week. One surface condition (none, 1/2", 1") was tested at each session and test order was counterbalanced. A test session consisted of 25 drop-jumps from 45cm onto a force platform with 10s between trials. Analysis: Mat thickness and fatigue effects on select kinetic measures were analyzed using 3x25 repeated measures ANOVA. Results: Findings will be delivered during the oral presentation.

Aaron Bales (2007, T): Marsh 212@11:30 AM

Title: Doctor Faustus's Appetite for Pride and Lust: A Story of Damnation by Faustus' Inner Desires
Major(s): English: Literature
Advisor(s): Steele


Abstract: Christopher Marlowe captured a legendary tale of a professor named John Faustus. Faustus was seeking an epistemology to fulfill his earthly desires brought forth by the Seven Deadly Sins. The two sins that enthralled Faustus' curiosity to an unbearable degree were Hubris (Pride), and Luxuria (Lust). These sins enticed Faustus through deceptive earthly power and sexual pleasures. Pride engaged Faustus' interest upon knowledge and supremacy, where Lust enticed through miraculous urges derived of fleshy endeavors, most importantly Helen of Troy. These sins enticed Faustus away from a true repentance that would grant forgiveness through salvation by God. The importance of salvation to Faustus' soul was one that eluded him to an eternity in hell, which is everywhere Faustus is and God is not.

Michaela Balkus (2010, T): Strain 121@1:00 PM

Title: Shuffle Your Way to Order
Major(s): Mathematics
Advisor(s): Rowell
Abstract: Throughout time, millions of people have played card games.  Since most card games begin with a deck in random order, methods of shuffling cards have been a subject of particular interest.  In this talk we will explain and explore the “pinch” shuffle introduced in Number Theory by George Andrews.  Our main focus will be the following, how many shuffles does it take to get particular deck of cards back to its original order?  We will answer this question for a deck of any size and continue further by discussing upper and lower bounds for the necessary number of “pinch” shuffles to return a deck back to its original order.

Amy Rose Banas (2011, T): Marsh 106@1:00 PM

Title: Looking into the Closet: Meeting the needs LGBTQ Foster Youth
Major(s): Social Work
Advisor(s): Ritter
Abstract: This Senior Capstone focuses on the needs of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and questioning (LGBTQ) foster youth served by the Department of Human Services (DHS) in Washington County. In 2008 there were an estimated 463,000 children in the U.S. foster care system, and this number has been predicted to increase due to the current economic recession. In child welfare, there is an emphasis placed on the importance of racial and ethnic identity when considering the needs of the foster youth, but sexual identity is often ignored. Through surveys and interviews with DHS caseworkers, the following areas were explored: training for foster parents and caseworkers; resources available for LGBTQ youth; and caseworkers' experiences working with LGBTQ foster youth. Implications and recommendations for the Department of Human Services are included in light of the needs of this vulnerable population.

Dana Marie Banda (2011, P): Strain Hall 1st Floor@1:00 PM

Title: Inhibition of the Cytokines TGF-β and PDGF leads to the reversal of progressive liver disease
Major(s): Biology
Advisor(s): Schnorr
Abstract: Studying the immunological characteristics associated with liver disease is important because this is a disease that can affect anyone. People diagnosed with this liver disease have to come to terms with the issue that their ailment will just continue to get worse as the years pass. The disease progresses from the hepatic fibrosis stage and later turns into cirrhosis. There are many ways to treat liver disease, however, the results have not always been so favorable because once the disease starts, the fibrotic accumulation in the liver continues to develop over several years until its condition worsens and leads to death. By conducting research on the inhibition of cytokines, current therapies can be perfected to improve clinical outcomes and to formulate therapies specific toward alcoholic hepatitis. The important factor in any type of liver disease is the suppression of the hyperactive inflammatoryresponse from the immune system. When the immune system is slightly suppressed, the condition of liver disease can be reversed. When there is injury in the liver, the inflammatory reaction is caused by the activation of hepatic stellate cells with cytokines, transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) and platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF). If this process is responsible for the increased fibrotic production in response to hepatic injury, then blocking the release of these cytokines should reduce the progression of hepatic fibrogenesis.

Sean Bangs (2014, T): Price 214@1:00 PM

Title: The War-Hungry Lion
Major(s): History
Advisor(s): Rampton
Abstract: Richard the Lionheart was born on 8 September 1157, and in July 1189 ascended the throne of the Angevin Empire, which included Ireland, England, and much of France. Richard the Lionheart fought wars before and during his reign, including suppression of rebellious nobles and the third Crusade While all agree that Richard was a mighty warrior, I argue that he was a poor king because he lacked a propensity for administration-a necessary quality for a medieval king. Comparing Richard with his father Henry II demonstrates Richard's ineptitude as a king. Henry pushed through numerous legislative changes during his reign (1154-89) as well as waging wars necessary to keep his empire intact or expand it. Richard the Lionheart, while he had the war department handled well before he ascended to the throne, did not enact a single legislative ruling in his entire reign. Richard was a poor king because he was a warmonger and had a drive to war like few others in his time. He viewed England as a cash cow that he exploited to, fund his armies and conquests.

Jessica Bania (2010, T): McGill Auditorium@9:30 AM

Title: Iglesia De San Alejandro: Rights And Accessibility To The Sacraments
Major(s): Media Arts: Journalism
Advisor(s): Cassady
Abstract: St. Alexander Church (Iglesia de San Alejandro) is a small parish based in Cornelius, Ore. From the outside looking in, one might mistake its unassuming façade as inconsequential; another building unnoticed on the daily commute. Beyond this, however, the building serves as a considerable force within its community of followers; a poor parish among the archdiocese of Portland that has managed to organize a Spanish-speaking adaptive mass program for a community of Hispanic families with disabled children--the only mass of its kind in Western Ore. This small group of hardworking individuals offers spiritual and practical support to struggling families around the Northwest. In working with St. Alexander’s as a layout designer and photo editor for their new church history book, I’ve moved on to my own study of the church, its adaptive monthly mass and classes, and have made a challenge to convey a specific community spirit through visual research and photojournalism.

Briana Bankston (2010, T): Marsh 101@1:30 PM

Title: A Test of the Embodied Cognition Hypothesis: The Sleeping, Acting, and Thinking Survey
Major(s): Psychology
Advisor(s): Kleinknecht
Abstract: In the late 1990's, an educational program called the 'Back to Sleep' program was developed to reduce the number of cases of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome by instructing parents and health care professionals to put infants to sleep on their backs. This positioning was shown to reduce the number of SIDS cases. The purpose of this study is to determine whether the resultant lack of time infants spend on their stomachs, due in part to the success of the Back to Sleep program, predicts their subsequent physical, social, and cognitive development. The logic behind this research question stems from the Embodied Cognition Hypothesis, such that acting and thinking are integrally linked; the way you act on the world guides your thinking about such experiences. Previous research has shown that impairments in vision change how an infant learns about the world, and because the perspective of an infant on his or her back is so very different than that of an infant on his or her tummy, an infant who remains in the supine position (on his or her back), instead of the prone position (on his or her stomach) outside of strictly sleeping may experience the world, and therefore learn and develop, in a very different way. To extend the findings of previous research, the researchers developed a survey for parents of children in preschool and kindergarten. The hypothesis is that the rate at which children achieve their physical, social and cognitive milestones will be predicted by their early sleeping and play positioning.

Cole Banta (2013, T): Price 203@1:00 PM

Title: The Effects of Zinc Deficiency and Cadmium Accumulation due to Smokeless Tobacco Use in the Occurrence of Oral Cancer
Major(s): Biology
Advisor(s): Rynd
Abstract: Cancer is the second leading cause of death in the world and oral cancer is the sixth most common cancer in the world today. Tobacco use has been targeted as one of the major risk factors for developing oral cancer. This literature review focuses on the effects of the accumulation of the toxic heavy metal cadmium that can be found in tobacco and the subsequent drop in the antioxidant zinc due to accumulation of cadmium. This review looks at literature that includes the carcinogenic effects of cadmium, as well as the cancer preventing effects of zinc. It will also look at mouth cancer patients and review the levels of cadmium and zinc found within mouth cancer patients and healthy referents, to view the correlation between the build up of cadmium and the deficiency of zinc with diagnosed mouth cancers.

Michael Barbee (2008, T): Price 204@1:00 PM

Title: Rocket Stoves: Improving Cook Stoves and Quality of Life while Reducing Environmental Impact
Major(s): Environmental Studies
Advisor(s): Van Buskirk
Gundersen

Abstract: Half of the world’s population cooks its food using biomass, mainly wood and dried dung. Unfortunately, cook fires often produce more smoke, burn more fuel, and impose greater risks for users than they should. By educating communities about simple stove design (e.g., insulating the heat path, pre-warming incoming air, increasing heat transfer into the pot), issues such as air quality, premature deaths, deforestation, global warming, and social safety can be addressed in a way that stimulates the economy while only requiring easily accessible resources/labor. A pioneer of this technology and implementation strategy has been the Aprovecho Research Center, the site of my 10-week summer internship. By disseminating free design information in places such as Africa, India, and Mexico, the Aprovecho Research Center has played a large role in doubling the efficiency of and halving the wood consumption of these biomass-burning stoves. The knowledge I gained from my internship led to collaboration with fellow Pacific senior, Lacy Todd, and the creation of a community-enhancing Rocket Stove demonstration kitchen located at the B-Street Farm. I will be discussing the kitchen’s design, its potential domestic applications, as well as some home-heating Rocket designs. This is a simple and exciting technology with global ramifications.

Zach Barckmann (2011, T): Library Conference@9:30 AM

Title: Rural County Woes: A look the poverty created by Wal-Mart
Major(s): Economics
Advisor(s): Haag
Abstract: Wal- Mart has been opening up stores across The United States of America since the sixties. The store has always stated that they try to open stores in places outside an urban center. How do those choices affect the places where the store opens? Though Wal-Mart is known for their low prices, they are also known for closing down local businesses. This project's focus is about the Wal-Mart influences the poverty levels in more rural areas of the United States.

Justin Barden (2008, T): Strain 121@10:30 AM

Title: Experimental Study of the Effectiveness of Bicycle Helmets in Reducing Impact Forces on the Head
Major(s): Physics
Advisor(s): Butler


Abstract: Each year, extreme athletes push the height at which they perform stunts. Half-pipe bicycle athletes find themselves performing tricks from ten to fifteen feet in the air. At this height, taking an impact directly to the head could be fatal unless equipped with the proper helmet. Our goal is to determine if a standard bicycle helmet will protect the head from a height reached by an extreme athlete. Additionally, we are testing to see if there is a difference in the protective ability of Snell- vs. CPSC-certified bicycle helmets. This experiment focuses on impact qualities of the Snell- and CPSC-certified bicycle helmets from a range of heights from ten to fifteen feet. We expect that the Snell-certified bicycle helmet will perform better than the CPSC-certified because of higher impact expectations that come with a Snell-certified helmet.

Cameron Bardwell (2008, T): Berglund 200@3:00 PM

Title: Taking "The Scenic Route": The Craft of Travel Writing
Major(s): English: Creative Writing
Advisor(s): Postma


Abstract: So often, we as readers are drawn to stories of adventure and travel. And like great writers Ernest Hemmingway, Jack London and Joseph Conrad, I wanted to write of adventures, and more than a few misadventures, in many different places. But the flaw I have always found with even the greatest writers of adventure fiction is that the works are just that, fiction. I wanted mine to be true stories. In studying more acclaimed travel writers, I gained insight into the elements necessary to crafting the travel essay. Following the works of humorists David Sedaris and Bill Bryson showed me the value of applying a humorous tone to some of my more lighthearted subjects, like getting completely lost in search of the fabled Mystery Spot of South Dakota, or being forced to spend the night in a roach-infested, rent-by-the-hour motel because I did not listen to my fiancé. Pico Iyer, showed me that a more somber tone works in pieces such as where I explore how travel can take a person to a place of isolation and loneliness. Along with tone, my studies also led me to another valuable aspect of travel writings, something I refer to as the touchstone. This key metaphor around which the piece revolves is apparent in the works of travel authors such as Adam Gopnik, Bill Bryson and Anne Lamott. For these authors, the key metaphors are the New York subway, overpriced restaurant food, and the author’s own butt. In my works, the touchstones include the game of soccer, a cup of coffee, and the misconceived notion that Starbucks invented gingerbread. This collection is a sample of my own adventures and misadventures in the real world, ones that anyone could take.

Brooke Barker (2007, T): Price 204@12:00 PM

Title: The Effect of Caffeine on Dynamic Postural Stability
Major(s): Exercise Science
Advisor(s): Henry


Abstract: It is commonly accepted that caffeine is the most frequently ingested drug in the world; thus, there is great interest in the effects of caffeine on human movement functioning. Some effects are well documented, such as enhancing muscular work capacity and increasing time to exhaustion during endurance exercise. Caffeine, recognized as an ergogenic aid for some athletic activities, is banned by the International Olympic Committee at levels >12 ¬µg/ml[caffeine] in blood. However, little is understood about the role of caffeine, if any, in altering dynamic postural stability. Purpose: This study investigated the effects of caffeine on postural stability during dynamic conditions. Methods: Ten healthy, physically active volunteers participated in a double-blind study consisting of an initial training session, a control condition (placebo), and an experimental condition (6 mg/kg body wt caffeine ingestion). Each participant completed both conditions on separate days and in random order. Pre-testing (prior to placebo or caffeine ingestion) and post-testing (60 minutes post ingestion) consisted of computer acquisition of dynamic postural stability measurements (i.e., time-in-center data obtained via stabilometer). An ANOVA for repeated measures was utilized to compare pretest and post test dynamic stability data for placebo and caffeine conditions.

Gordon Barker (2007, T): Taylor Auditorium: Marsh 216@8:30 AM

Title: Freshmen Orientation and Freshmen Orientation Leaders
Major(s): Psychology
Advisor(s): Burns-Glover


Abstract: While there are abundant theories and models to explain the "freshman experience," and predictors of successful freshman retention (Tinto, 1982), little systematic attention has been paid to the experiences of those peers who implement the freshman orientation activities. An action research model is applied to the freshman year orientation experience. Stakeholder interviews were conducted with administrators and peer counselors (Ambassadors) to assess their perceptions of a) the goals of freshman orientation; b) the role of one's social identity in college adjustment; c) the symmetry of administrators', freshmen, and ambassadors' perceptions of the orientation experience. University administrators provided a list of six goals of freshman orientation. These were used to design two surveys. Freshman (N=170) completed a questionnaire post-orientation to assess the effectiveness of the program. Ambassadors (N=22) completed questionnaires in which they rated a) how important they, personally, believe these goals to be and b) how well they believe these goals are met. As a major theory of student retention is that "non-cognitive" factors affect student adjustment, these results are compared across sociodemographic categories. Ambassadors were asked to describe and rank the important features of a 'successful student,' and these are compared to what the freshman questionnaire indicated was successful about orientation. Ambassadors' ratings should indicate that their own social identities affect their perceptions of what makes a "successful student" and that they have different perceptions from the freshman as to what the most important features of orientation should be. Results are discussed within the framework of Tinto's retention theory, and suggestions for more inclusion of peers, mentors, and orientation leaders in determining the goals of such programs are outlined.

Kyle Barksdale (2010, T): McGill Auditorium@11:30 AM

Title: The Federal Reserve?s Response to the Crisis
Major(s): Economics
Advisor(s): Haag
Abstract: The current economic crisis has led to wide spread criticism of the Federal Reserve. The policies that the Federal Reserve administered during the recent crisis will be compared to the overall affect they had on increasing discount lending, inflation, the unemployment rate, and the amount of excess reserves that banks hold. This paper will explore whether their policies were successful in limiting the damages of the crisis or whether the Federal Reserves’ policies were ineffective and harmful.

Kendra Barksdale (2013, T): Berglund 230@10:30 AM

Title: Investment in Real Estate: Are REITs Effective?
Major(s): Business
Advisor(s): Dong
Abstract: This study examines the effectiveness of the Real Estate Investment Trusts (REITs) in terms of capturing the return of the housing market. At present, the equity market carries higher fluctuation than its historical volatility, and the bond market generates low yield. The abuse of derivatives leads to poor investor confidence and asset valuation turbulence. The uncertainty in these three major capital instruments increases the attractiveness of the real estate assets. Investors generally participate in the real estate market by direct asset holding or by REIT. Using monthly data for the median sales price of new houses sold, quarterly returns in the housing price index as well as the REIT index, I determine that REITs are on the efficient frontier and therefore an effective way to enter the real estate market, even though transaction costs are considered. In addition, REITs can significantly hedge the inflation risk, which is a non-reducible systematic risk in the equity market due to poor pass-through rates.

Ellie Barna (2011, T): Price 204@9:30 AM

Title: Effect of Co-Performer Relationship on Task Perception
Major(s): Exercise Science
Advisor(s): Jackson
Abstract: Research has shown us that perceptions can by affected by a number of variables, including age, fatigue, and performance (Proffitt et al., 2003). For example, if a golfer believes they are putting well, research has shown that they will perceive the hole to be bigger than those who are not putting well (Witt et al. 2008). A study by Schnall (2008) suggests that having the support of another (i.e., social support) can result in the task being seen as easier (i.e., the social facilitation effect). Social facilitation is described as enhancing an individual's actions by the presence of others doing the same thing (Adegbesan, 2001). Purpose: The aim of this study was to investigate how the relationship of the coperformer affects one's perceptions of physical tasks. Methods: Participants were placed in one of three conditions, based on whether there was another individual present, and the strength of relationship with the co-performer (Alone, Paired-Weak, Paired-Strong), and asked their perceptions on three physical task variables (height, slant, distance). Results & Conclusions: Findings will be presented as to the effect of social presence and relationship on task perceptions.

Lauren Barnard (2011, T): CLIC@9:30 AM

Title: Vive le francais: the Evolution of Modern French
Major(s): World Languages: French
Advisor(s): de Larquier
Abstract: French has always been a predominant language in the western world. From the fall of Charlemagne to the slang of today, some form of French has been spoken in Europe, but it has not always been the same and neither has it been a steady rate of change. Languages evolve much the same as the people who speak them, in leaps and bounds and much as humanity would like to believe that great change comes out of flourishing golden ages, war is usually the aggressor that pushes language to new heights. Turmoil creates vocabulary, standardization and policies that have cemented French into the language that is spoken today. The Revolution, two World Wars and an ever globalized world have defined French in the past three centuries. This thesis will show the correlation between language and upheaval and will also discuss how these periods of turmoil have molded the French language. The battle for pure French in 1789 was fought just as fiercely as the battle being fought today against English and globalization and these battles not only evolve French, but define it.

Tess Barr (2009, T): Strain 121@8:30 AM

Title: Educational Gardening in the Public Schools
Major(s): Environmental Studies
Advisor(s): Gundersen
Abstract: My project involved the creation of a garden club for fourth through sixth grade students at an elementary school in Silverton, Oregon. The goals of this project were to instill an appreciation and awareness of nature, as well as a basic knowledge of gardening and food production. In addition, I worked to make the school’s existing garden more productive, while reducing the amount of annual maintenance needed. I employed hands-on teaching methods to engage student’s curiosity and creativity and used a variety of gardening techniques including intensive and perennial gardening. These techniques created an enjoyable experience for the students which excited their interest in the workings of a garden as well as forming a garden which could be maintained with less work and expense to the school. I gained an understanding of the requirements of coordinating a group of individuals and the challenges of working with children and within the school system.

Hamilton Barrett (2009, T): Library Conference@11:00 AM

Title: Missed It! Theatre
Major(s): Theatre
Advisor(s): Margolis
Abstract: You're sitting in the MAX, riding into Portland and minding your own business. The train stops, some crazy-looking woman gets on the train, and you think "Oh I hope she doesn't come over here. . . " but she's already headed your way. She sits down, frantically rambling about government cover-ups and paranoid delusions of stalkers coming to take her away. You try to ignore her, but you can't help but watch as she makes her way past you and down the train, begging for someone to save her. A curious, but not too uncommon sight for anyone who's taken the MAX or walked around Portland for any stretch of time. But on this particular day you start to notice men in black suits moving about the car. . . following her? You start to consider that she may not be as crazy as you thought when you hear a scream and look just in time to see the woman dart off the train while the men in black suits gather up the contents of a briefcase—dozens of pictures of that same woman!—before they run off after her. Your mind starts to spin. What have you just witnessed? The answer is . . . Theatre. For some actors, "All the world's a stage," and for one otherwise ordinary weekend in March, the Missed It! Theatre Company took the MAX and made it their stage. Come listen and experience Missed It! Theatre, a story that includes six-foot rabbits, light sabers, and the Portland Police.

Hamilton Barrett (2009, T): Milky Way@3:30 PM

Title: Little Ghost
Major(s): Media Arts: Film and Video Production
Advisor(s): Hardacker
Abstract: Jack King, a troubled young veteran, returns home from Iraq to discover a beautiful ghost living in his parents' attic. Despite his family and friends mounting concerns he finds solace in the ghost's company. A film about belief, love, and loss, "Little Ghost" is a story that I have been wanting to tell for a long time. The project lets me explore the themes of the film through every aspect of the process; from script, to shooting, to the editing room, and gives me the chance to focus on supporting those themes through the pacing and image juxtaposition in the editing -- my particular passion of the process.

Jessica Barry (2013, T): Berglund 232@10:30 AM

Title: STEAM Project Based Summer Camp Curriculum at B Street Farm
Major(s): FG. Education and Learning
Advisor(s): Phillips
Abstract: What is necessary for a STEAM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Art, Math) based curriculum? How can this curriculum be implemented at B Street, a sustainable environmental friendly farm, during a summer camp? We designed a curriculum for a ten-day, three-hour daily, summer camp for second through fifth graders. Over the course of the first semester we researched environmental education, backwards design, project based learning, and STEAM to obtain ideas on how to best create this specific type of curriculum. During the second semester, we conducted interviews with students and teachers around the Portland area to gain a perspective on environmental education and lesson planning. We learned effective elements of a STEAM unit that include: hands on activities, group work, cultural awareness, and community learning. As teacher action-researchers we feel that this STEAM curriculum will best serve B Street's mission to provide inspiration and information about environmentally sensitive and sustainable living practices, and create more innovative and creative children, by incorporating all of these elements.

Lesley Bart (2007, T): Marsh 214@8:30 AM

Title: People Unite! Take Back The Night! Feminist Theoretical Implications for Organizing in Small Communities
Major(s): Feminist Studies
Advisor(s): Pagan


Abstract: I will describe my experience organizing the Take Back The Night march and rally and the theoretical implications of applying feminist theory to real life practice. The approach to organizing this event was based on multicultural and radical feminist perspectives, specifically the works of bell hooks and Audre Lorde and their positions on organizing against patriarchal oppression. I will address and explain the deliberate choices made in organizing this event such debates between gender-inclusive and women-only spaces and the special concerns about structure and content for organizing and executing this event at a small liberal arts university in a non-urban area.

Lesley Bart (2007, T): Marsh LL21@10:30 AM

Title: Where's My Box? A Foucauldian Examination of Transgender Knowledge
Major(s): Sociology
Advisor(s): Phillips


Abstract: Transgender identity and what it means to be transgender has been discussed and debated by natural science and social sciences alike for at least half a century. What "trans' has come to mean within these various fields has shifted and has come to mean many different things, despite science's propagation of truth and certainty regarding binary gender identity. My thesis will explore the sites of knowledge that have competed to define transgenderism. Psychiatry, biology, and critical sociology are a few of the fields of study that have questioned and debated the assumption of binary gender categorization and have sought to claim a scientific location for transgenderism. Using Foucauldian methods of discourse analysis, I will reveal the presuppositions each site makes about transgenderism and analyze the rhetorical devices and strategies used to validate or invalidate the notion of transgender identity as compatible to or transgressive of the binary gender system.

Ross Bartlett (2009, T): Marsh 101@9:30 AM

Title: Political Orientation and Physiological Arousal
Major(s): Psychology
Advisor(s): Island
Abstract: The current study is a replication of our 2008 study presented at the Oregon Academy of Science conference with a longitudinal aspect included. This study investigates the differences in self-reported political orientation (Liberals and Conservatives) and physiological responses to traumatic imagery. Political orientation and actual political values were also assessed. We also included an assessment of measured political orientation pre and post 2008 Presidential Election. A recent study conducted by Oxley et al. (2008) examined the physiological reactions of 46 participants with strong political beliefs. They found that individuals with measurably lower physical sensitivities to sudden noises and threatening visual images were more likely to support liberal values and policies (e.g. gun control and foreign aid). The opposite was found to be true with the participants who supported conservative values. 86 participants were included in our study (43 males, 43 females) with a mean age of 19 years. Participants were instructed to fill out a demographics sheet, a political values quiz, and then they viewed a slideshow containing neutral and evocative images while being monitored by a Galvanic Skin Response machine. Upon data analyses, our study revealed a negative correlation between the political orientation of respondents and their measured galvanic response. It showed that as measured political orientation moved towards the conservative end of the spectrum (i.e. 20 on a 0 to 20 point scale), the measured Galvanic Skin Response decreased as well. Also, when regression analysis was conducted the data showed that participants’ measured political orientation was a significant predictor of physiological arousal in response to evocative stimuli presented in the slideshow. This data represents possible differences in physiological response to traumatic stimuli between measured political orientations. Perhaps more intriguing, there was no significant difference among Liberals and Conservatives in their political orientation quiz scores. This may indicate that despite self-reported political orientation, participants may lack personal knowledge and/or experience in regards to political issues.

Carson Bartlett (2012, T): Berglund 232@2:00 PM

Title: Rough Housing to an "A"
Major(s): Education
Advisor(s): Nelson
Abstract: The purpose of our project is to investigate developmental, social, physical, and academic benefits that may be aided or enhanced through rough-and-tumble play. The investigation took place at The Early Learning Community at Pacific University (ELC). Data collected included parent surveys, teacher questionnaires, pictures, videos, and 36 hours of field notes all focusing on children 3-6 years of age. The data collected was analyzed and coded based on themes found in the review of the literature. Themes used for the data analyses included (a) developmental benefits, (b) gender differences, and (c) assessment and regulation. Our critical questions included the following. How do boys and girls attention, concentration, and focus levels change prior to rough-and-tumble play and after rough-and-tumble play? How does talk and language regarding problem solving and conflict resolution, among the children, develop through rough-and-tumble play? What can teachers do to facilitate rough-and-tumble play in order to maximize learning and physical potential?

Alexia Barton (2008, T): Price 203@2:00 PM

Title: Temperature-Dependent Sex Determination Rescued Alligators from the Fate of Dinosaurs during Global Cooling: What Will Global Warming Wipe Out?
Major(s): Biology
Advisor(s): Halpern


Abstract: The gender of a species is determined either genotypically, where gender is determined by the absence or presence of a specific sex chromosome, or environmentally, where gender is decided by environmental factors such as pH, temperature, and humidity. This presentation covers which organisms exhibit Genotypic Sex Determination (GSD), Temperature-Dependent Sex Determination (TSD), or both. The phenotypic effects of TSD and the mechanisms behind it are covered in greater depth, because it is the least understood. Also examined are reasons for dinosaur extinction during the Cretaceous period despite alligator (TSD), crocodile (TSD), and bird (GSD) survival. The outcome of the Cretaceous period, along with those of current studies, shows that TSD organisms adapt to their environment prior to their births. Therefore, TSD organisms are more likely to survive global warming than their larger, GSD competition.

Charlotte Basch (2014, T): Marsh 201@2:30 PM

Title: Identity Conflict, Negotiation, and Conservation Among the Clatsop-Nehalem People
Major(s): Anthropology
Advisor(s): Mahar
Abstract: Over 160 years ago the most respected representatives of the Clatsop and Nehalem-Tillamook peoples met at the sight of Tansy Point in Warrenton, Oregon. Despite the agreements made that August day in 1851, Congress failed to ratify the multiple treaties and ultimately left the Native peoples of the north Oregon coast and southern Washington coast in both a legal and cultural quagmire. Also among the conglomerate of tribes, bands, and villages listed in the Western Oregon Indian Termination Acts of the 1950s, the now confederated Clatsop-Nehalem tribe struggles to maintain any form of political and even traditional rights. Although the history of the Clatsop-Nehalem people has had devastating affects on the well being of the tribe as an organizational entity, the tribe and its members continue to be vital aspects of the greater historical, social, and cultural community of the north Oregon coast. While the legal profanities experienced by the Clatsop-Nehalem may have caused members to have conflicting legal and political identity constructs, the steadfast negotiation and maintenance of a cultural identity is demonstrated throughout individual and communal oral histories. This paper highlights the means of identity construction and preservation particularly through the employment of counter- or safe-spaces and an examination of a sense of communal identity.

Rebecca Basham-Sanchez (2007, T): Library Classroom@3:00 PM

Title: What Exactly is Pornography?
Major(s): Philosophy
Advisor(s): Boersema


Abstract: A concept that cannot be defined leaves society's normative views and social policy in constant turmoil and confusion as to how to treat something that does not have an adequate definition. In other words, if "pornography" has no real definition, then how can a thing be considered "pornographic" at all? There are a myriad of arguments as to what constitutes a thing as pornographic; four of these arguments of how to determine or label a representation as pornographic are addressed. After a look at 3 main qualities all pornography exhibit, social policy and how pornography should be treated are taken into consideration.

Rebecca Basham-Sanchez (2007, T): Marsh LL21@1:00 PM

Title: Women's Negotiation Techniques for Breastfeeding in Public
Major(s): Sociology
Advisor(s): Phillips


Abstract: New mothers often find themselves in challenging situations, especially when it comes to feeding their infants. Although there has been an increase in the number of women who initiate breastfeeding, and in the duration of breastfeeding, mothers often experience scorn from others when breastfeeding in public. Mothers report being called inconsiderate, "flashy" when a breast becomes exposed, and even "indecent" when a nipple is exposed. To avoid being stigmatized while breastfeeding in public, women use various interaction techniques. Their negotiations depend upon the presence of others, seating location, prior experiences, comfort of self and child, type of establishment, and the behavior of their child. Through qualitative research methods I conducted interviews with breastfeeding mothers to determine how mothers decide whether or not to breastfeed and how they go about breastfeeding in public places.

Kaitrin Bassett (2009, T): Price 202@9:00 AM

Title: The Effect of Instructor and Student Gender on Demonstration Effectiveness
Major(s): Exercise Science
Advisor(s): Jackson
Abstract: Modeling is a powerful and effective method of delivering information to a learner to assist in motor acquisition. Although most teachers utilize this method, very little attention is paid to the relationship of model and learner characteristics, and their resulting effect on acquisition. While it has been suggested that gender of the instructor may affect the outcome, results are not consistent. Purpose: The purpose of the current study was to determine the effect that instructor gender had on one’s ability to learn a motor skill. The study furthered previous research on modeling and gender by examining both male and female participants (as opposed to only studying females). This study also examined possible factors affecting performance beyond gender of the model, such as attitudes and experience. Methods: Male and female participants were provided video instruction on how to perform a forehand Frisbee throw, delivered by either a male or female instructor. Participants completed a post- and transfer-test on their ability to accurately perform (form and accuracy) the skill. In addition, participants completed questionnaires regarding the perceptions of each instructor, attitudes regarding the interaction between coaching and gender (AAMFC-Q), and experience levels with opposite-gendered coaches. Analyses: A multivariate ANOVA was run to determine if groups differed in performance (technique and form scores) and attitudes regarding their instructors. Results: No significant differences were found in the outcome measures between groups. Of the eleven questions included in the AAMFC-Q, only one resulted in a significant model and gender interaction, one resulted in a gender effect, and one resulted in a model effect. Conclusion: Although some perceptions of the model differed, the gender of the instructor did not affect the performance (technique and accuracy) of the task used in the study.

Kathleen Bassett (2012, T): Marsh 201@2:00 PM

Title: Working Young Men & Romantic Intimacy
Major(s): Sociology
Advisor(s): Rafalovich
Abstract: Valuable insights regarding the intimate and emotional lives of men have been illuminated due to the work of sociologists who have sought to reexamine assertions that men are incapable of thinking about, or unwilling to reflect upon and discuss, intimate aspects of their personal lives. When Sociologists have approached men's experiences of intimacy deductively, meaning that they ask men for their own definitions and experiences with intimacy, they have found that both men and women desire intimacy, but that men and women may experience, enact, and reflect on intimacy differently due to the social construction of masculinity. These studies have also increasingly shown that relationships may offer a context in which less traditional expressions of masculinity and sexuality might be played out. These past studies, however, do not explore socioeconomic status, which in addition to gender, intersects in the arena of sexuality and intimacy; both are structures that rely on beliefs about how, when, and with whom individuals should be intimate with. Previous conclusions reached by sociologists on masculinity and intimacy were based on interviews with college educated males and/or men who hold white collar jobs, meaning that their data and conclusions are only based on the experiences of middle class men. Both studies recognize that their samples are limited and that future research is necessary, but neither discuss or conceptualize their conclusions on masculinity and intimacy as theoretically limited due to their participants' being socioeconomically privileged. My research objective is to fill in these gaps and to gain the perspectives of young working class men by interviewing them about their experiences of romantic and sexual intimacy, as well as how manhood relates to intimacy. Additionally, I will be asking my participants about how their intimate partners relate to and integrate with other aspects of their life (work, family, friends, life plans). Previous studies on masculinity and intimacy have only focused on the private and interpersonal aspects of intimacy, but have ignored external factors and internal drives that might also impact the quality of the intimate relationship. My hope is that in addition to gaining insight on social class and gender as they pertain to the ways in which individuals experience intimacy, that I can also gain a more holistic perspective on working class men's daily lives, internal drives, and emotional needs.

Josh Bateman (2011, T): Berglund 200@3:00 PM

Title: Walden and Fight Club: Prescribing a Lifestyle
Major(s): English: Literature
Advisor(s): Thompson
Abstract: Henry David Thoreau, no doubt, holds a position very near the center of the American literary cannon, and his most famous work, Walden, is read in high school and college classes alike. In fact, Walden is so well known and well received that it has not been out of print since the year its author died, 1862. One hundred and thirty-four years later, Chuck Palahniuk published Fight Club, which sold better in its beginning years than Walden but the two books sold to very different demographics. Fight Club is not widely considered to be inside the American literary cannon but may, in fact, deserve to be there. Palahniuk's novel is often seen as an immature young male's fantasy of violence and chaos, but my thesis compares Fight Club and Walden from Thoreau's transcendental viewpoint, through which Fight Club is intellectually redeemed. Through this comparison Fight Club gains literary respect and Walden is unlocked and understood.

McKenzie Bauske (2013, T): Berglund 232@2:30 PM

Title: Teaching Choir Through a Comprehensive Musicianship (CMP) Approach
Major(s): Music Education
Advisor(s): Ihas
Abstract: The purpose of this project was to examine the educational value of the comprehensive musicianship (CMP) approach in the choral setting. The participants in this project were 11 volunteers from the university choral courses, 4 men and 7 women. Students were taught Mozart's "Ave Verum Corpus," utilizing modified strategies of CMP. Following the instructional portion of the project, a questionnaire was administered to participants. The results were reported and suggestions for further investigation were put forth.

Tiffanie Bearce (2007, T): Marsh 201@8:30 AM

Title: Education Reform in China: Challenges a Nation Faces in Changing a Thousand Year Old System
Major(s): International Studies
Advisor(s): Mahar


Abstract: As it is increasingly situated in the globalized marketplace, China is preparing itself to play a much wider role in global affairs. China has taken steps internally to reform government and to broaden their citizens' ability to own property and work within the world of global capital. China is also creating for itself a class of professionals who can meet the demand, locally and abroad, for international business men and women, those who can take a leadership role in global politics and in global economics. In an effort to meet these needs, China has begun the slow process of education reform. This study examines the challenges China faces in rewriting an educational system that carries with it over a thousand years of history. Using qualitative and ethnographic methods, this study reports on changes in education through a case study from Wenzhou Medical College in Wenzhou, China.

Andrew Beatty (2013, T): Marsh 106@2:00 PM

Title: Joe Paterno: Evil Narcissist or Innocent Bystander?
Major(s): Psychology
Advisor(s): Schultz
Abstract: This psychobiography seeks to interpret the late coach Joe Paterno's involvement in the investigation of recently convicted Jerry Sandusky along with key events leading up to Paterno's removal as head coach of the Penn State Football program. One particular focus is the theory (promulgated by media) that Paterno's presumed "narcissism" was pivotal in his lack of action to protect children from a predator and his apparent concealment of information regarding Sandusky. A timeline of key findings will be provided from the Freeh investigative report (published in 2012) as they pertain to Paterno, along with personal responses from former coaches and players. An analysis of the Freeh report and Joe Posnanski's biography "Paterno" (2012) will serve as a tool for examining various psychological arguments centering on Paterno's personality.

Michelle Beck (2009, T): Marsh 206@9:00 AM

Title: Still At War: Veteran Legislation Then and Now
Major(s): Politics and Government
Advisor(s): Boykoff
Abstract: This thesis explores the elements of power that influenced the creation of both early and current veteran legislation in the United States. Using Hugh Heclo’s learning theory as the analytical framework, I explore the political processes that undergird these respective groups of legislation, focusing on humanistic factors.

Rachel Beck (2011, T): McCready Hall@10:00 AM

Title: Teaching Clarinet
Major(s): Music
Advisor(s): Stephens
Abstract: This presentation will describe the process of choosing, arranging and teaching music to students in both middle school and high school levels. Two quartets will perform, one representing a middle school or beginner level, and the other representing a high school level of musicianship. Both quartets are playing music that I have arranged to be appropriate for the respective skill levels. The students in the beginner quartet are music students who play other instruments, but do not specialize in clarinet, and represent various levels of understanding. For example, one student is proficient in another woodwind instrument, but has not played clarinet in an ensemble; another is a brass instrumentalist who is learning a woodwind instrument for the first time; another yet is a pianist who has never played a wind instrument and will be learning the basics of breathing and embouchure necessary for any wind instrument. The second ensemble will represent a high school- or college-level group of students whose primary instrument is clarinet. The students in this group may or may not have previously played in a small ensemble, and the focus of performance will be on the balance and intonation, as well as non-verbal communication necessary for a small ensemble to perform accurately without a conductor. The presentation will discuss all of the steps taken in the education process from music selection and arrangement to rehearsal and performance.

David Bednar (2007, T): Price 202@9:30 AM

Title: Argentine Ant Aggression and Its Role in Its Success as an Invasive Species
Major(s): Biology
Advisor(s): Halpern


Abstract: Invasive species play key roles in shaping the environment. Behaviors that span native and invasive populations can play different roles in their respective environments. In its native environment, South America, the Argentine ant coexists with a variety of other ant species, but since its introduction into North America it has been shown to have deleterious effects on native ant populations. In this review I will discuss the role aggression plays in the spatial distribution of the Argentine ant and how it affects the environments it has invaded. Similarly, I will discuss how the new environment affects the invading species. Some attributes conserved or lost between native and invasive Argentine ant populations help lead to its success in both ranges.

Anna Beebe (2011, T): Marsh 206@1:30 PM

Title: A Study of Suppression: Communism, Environmentalism, and Terrorism
Major(s): Politics and Government
Advisor(s): Boykoff
Abstract: This study looks at how ideological threats to the government are suppressed in the United States. The suppression of dissent by governments is in no way a new practice. What some would call attacks on our civil liberties after the attacks on September 11th 2001 was not simply a response to the threat of terrorism. Suppression has been used historically to quiet the voices of those the government disagrees with. This study looks specifically at the modes of suppression used against the Communist Party usa during the second red scare, and against the Earth Liberation Front during the 2000s. I examine the types of suppression used against these two groups; then I explain how the suppression is used similarly or differently between the cases. Strategies including opinion control, demonization, direct assault, and internal infiltration work together to create an atmosphere in which dissenting opinions are held down by the government and looked down upon by the people.

Kirsten Beier (2007, T): Taylor Auditorium: Marsh 216@2:30 PM

Title: Food Sharing by Chimpanzees at Chimfunshi Wildlife Orphanage Trust
Major(s): Psychology
Advisor(s): Bodamer


Abstract: Humans share with their mates, offspring, extended family, friends, and at times, complete strangers for a variety of reasons. Sometimes this sharing is the tolerated taking of food by an individual (passive sharing); at other times the food is directly handed to an individual (active sharing). While humans engage in both passive and active sharing, for chimpanzees the evidence is not as clear. One hypothesis is that chimpanzees share to avoid beggar harassment (Gilby, 2006). Chimpanzees at Chimfunshi Wildlife Orphanage Trust are fed by staff daily. I plan to study how these chimpanzees share food when released back into their outdoor enclosure. Do they share passively, actively, or both? Does sharing style change as a function of partner, reproductive state, familial relation, or social alliance? The relationship between food sharing and begging will be noted. The results of this study will further our understanding of the role that food sharing plays in chimpanzees living in large social groups.

Matthew Beil (2007, T): Marsh 212@11:00 AM

Title: The Iron Youth's Great Adventure: Communal and Societal Breakdown in All Quiet on the Western Front
Major(s): English: Literature
Advisor(s): Steele
Beard

Abstract: The First World War was an event in history unlike any other. The War to End All Wars would ultimately lead to the deaths of millions of young soldiers and to the complete destruction of a whole generation. In Erich Maria Remarque's All Quiet on the Western Front, the character Paul B?§umer symbolizes the destroyed generation, and through his story one witnesses the societal betrayal of Germany and the subsequent establishment of a community of camaraderie that is the soldier's last connection to human life. But ultimately the comradeship developed between Paul B?§umer and fellow soldiers is unable to withstand the destruction of the war his society so strongly encouraged. Germany portrayed the war to Paul B?§umer's generation as a great adventure in which they were to become the Iron Youth. But as Remarque states, that war "is not an adventure to those who stand face to face with it," and the lives of the youth were frail and could not withstand the destruction. Considered the greatest anti-war novel, All Quiet on the Western Front demonstrates through the character of Paul B?§umer the power that society held over all who were enticed to fight.

Alexis Bell (2013, T): Marsh LL5@11:30 AM

Title: Joan Mitchell: Battling Masculinity in Abstract Expressionism
Major(s): Art History
Advisor(s): Twist
Abstract: Many people are familiar with the famous works of Jackson Pollock and his American style of painting termed Abstract Expressionism; a very gestural and non-representational painting idiom. Joan Mitchell, on the other hand, is little known or recognized for her role as a female Abstract Expressionist painter. This study explores Mitchell's influence and contribution to American Art, specifically looking at the 1940s to the 1980s. While this study considers her biography, it also provides a critical and formal analysis of her artworks in order to demonstrate that her work clearly aligns itself with the first generation Abstract Expressionists like Pollock. Moreover, by examining her work through a feminist theoretical standpoint, insight is gained on the male dominated culture of the Abstract Expressionist movement, which also contributes to Mitchell's obscurity. Thus, this study shows how this masculine culture prohibited female artists, specifically Joan Mitchell, from reaching their full potential as modern artists, relegating them to the margins of American Art.

Alexis Bell (2013, T): Marsh LL5@9:00 AM

Title: Embracing Vulnerability
Major(s): Art
Advisor(s): Flory
Abstract: For my Fine Arts senior capstone project I am creating several fabric sculptures that explore ideas of embrace and vulnerability. Each piece approaches the concept of embrace in a different way. Some pieces push viewers away while other pieces will draw viewers in. For example, I will have one work where viewers can walk inside a circle of hanging branch like forms and be embraced by these fabric appendages. I hope to show a relationship between embrace and vulnerability.

Ashley Bellamy (2009, T): McGill Auditorium@9:00 AM

Title: Testing the Brand
Major(s): Media Arts: Journalism
Advisor(s): Cassady
Abstract: Traditionally, colleges and universities never needed to brand themselves, but like many products and services in the market today the more memorable the brand, the more marketable the product or service. For the first time in Pacific University’s history it has launched a comprehensive marketing campaign and created a new logo and brand image. This project will serve as a case study on how a college or university should develop their brand identity. Pacific’s brand will be put to the test and be compared with other colleges and universities that have gone through the same process. An analysis of the successes and failures in branding higher education will be addressed.

Sara Bellwood (2014, T): Marsh 206@8:30 AM

Title: Policy Analysis of Oregon Senate Bill 673
Major(s): Public Health
Advisor(s): Peterson-Besse
Abstract: At least 100,000 U.S. children are exploited in prostitution every year in America, and it is estimated that 293,000 American youths are currently at risk of becoming victims of commercial sexual exploitation. Individuals who buy commercial sex acts create the demand for sex trafficking and make it profitable for traffickers to sexually exploit children and adolescents. Efforts to prevent sex trafficking of minors need to confront the demand. This policy analysis will consider multiple policy options, including the approach used by Oregon Senate Bill 673, which increased penalties for purchasing sex with a minor when it was passed into law in 2013. Additional policy options to be explored in this capstone project include making purchasing and possession of child pornography a felony and mandating posting of the National Human Trafficking Resource Center hotline in certain establishments. Additionally, final policy recommendations will be provided in this presentation.

Kim Belt (2009, T): Price 202@4:30 PM

Title: A New Procedure for Ni(III) Analysis of a Nickel Electrode
Major(s): Chemistry
Advisor(s): Whiteley
Abstract: The Nickel electrode is used in varying battery technologies which include Nickel-Hydrogen and Nickel-Cadmium. Currently, the procedures for determining the state of charge of these NiOOH-containing electrodes are difficult and of questionable accuracy. The state of charge determination requires a measurement of the Ni(III) content of the electrode, and is required for battery cell failure analysis and charge retention studies. A new procedure has been developed that is based on the addition of hydrazine (N2H4) to quantitatively, and irreversibly reduce the Ni(III) to Ni(II). The excess N2H4 is then determined by titration with primary standard iodate (IO3-) solution. This new procedure has been shown to be resistant to the matrix effects which compromise other methods of Ni(III) determination.

Magdalene Rose Beltrone (2010, T): Library Conference@2:30 PM

Title: Lights for Lu?au
Major(s): Theatre
Advisor(s): Sanders
Abstract: My senior project is to create and execute a lighting design for the 50th annual Pacific University Lu’au that will be performed on April 10th, 2010. In addition, I will be creating a lighting design to serve not only for this year, but can also can be easily duplicated for following years with minimal additional work. My design work incorporates researching the history of the Lu’au event and of the dances that have been selected for this year’s performances. Luaus are traditionally performed outside in a rich tropical atmosphere. Here at Pacific, our Luau is an indoor event, performed in a basketball arena where the lighting design must enhance the show yet not distract from the dances. As the space that is used for Lu’au is not set up for theatrical lighting, part of the project is react to this challenge. I have worked with the faculty and staff to design and construct appropriate positions for the lighting equipment in the arena, and also for the power accommodations necessary. I will be coordinating all of these efforts with Faculty, Student Performers and Crew, Choreographers, Facilities Staff, Hawaiian Club representatives, and outside vendors. This coordination requires skills relating to theatrical design, budgeting, time management, creativity, logistics, electrical power service formulas, trigonometric calculations of lenses, and C.A.D. drafting.

Jillian Bender (2010, T): Library Conference@8:30 AM

Title: Young or Old, We Love to Play
Major(s): Art
Advisor(s): Flory
Abstract: These photographs are my attempt to present people playing in their environment. The images were taken of subjects unknowingly in front of my camera lens. Children can be spontaneous and creative almost anywhere. Adults are a bit more rigid and reserved about their play.

Sara Benefiel (2011, T): Marsh 101@10:30 AM

Title: Importance of "Tummy to Play" for Promoting Optimal Cognitive Development
Major(s): Psychology
Advisor(s): Kleinknecht
Abstract: As a response to the high occurrence of SIDS (sudden infant death syndrome) a national public awareness campaign was launched in 1994; the "Back to Sleep" campaign urged parents to place their infants on their back to sleep rather than on their stomach. This decreased the incidence of SIDS by more than 40% since 1992 (Sallas, Silverman, & Gatty, 2002) but in 1995 a concerning change in developmental patterns of infants was observed. It appeared that parents had stopped putting their infants on their stomach altogether and this had an adverse affect on development. In 1996 the campaign was updated to include "Tummy to Play" which encouraged parents to give their infants "tummy time" or time on their stomach while awake. It is clear that parents follow the advice of the first campaign but the extent to which parents comply with the tummy time update is not clear. Piaget (1952) proposed that interaction with the environment is a building block for intelligence. Current research suggests that tummy time gives infants more opportunity to interact with the environment which may lead to optimal cognitive development. This study investigates if variations in infant positioning lead to variations in milestone development.

Daniel Benner (2007, T): Marsh LL21@8:30 AM

Title: The Social Context of Drinking Games in the College Environment
Major(s): Sociology
Advisor(s): Phillips


Abstract: College students' drinking habits have been the topic of much academic inquiry, but most of this research is quantitative and statistical in approach. There is little qualitative and contextual analysis of college drinking. This study seeks to provide an ethnographic lens with which to view college binge-drinking habits, particularly drinking games and the role they play in intoxication and socialization. In-depth interviews is my method of research, utilizing typologies for games and participants to help guide my data analysis.

Corey Bennet (2008, T): McGill Auditorium@10:00 AM

Title: INeverHeardtheBullet.com: Standing Out in a Crowd
Major(s): Media Arts
Advisor(s): Geraci


Abstract: It is harder than ever for bands to get recognition for themselves in the crowded scene of mildly talented bands playing below-average music. The up-and-coming Portland rock band, I Never Heard the Bullet has quickly separated itself from the pack with a unique blend of heavy, aggressive instrumentals and hook-driven R&B vocal styling. I have created ineverheardthebullet.com, a media-rich website to both reflect and showcase the distinctiveness of this band. This site will give new and current fans the ability to listen to music, browse photo galleries, read about the band’s history, and stay current with new information from the band. My presentation will describe the development process of creating and launching ineverheardthebullet.com.

Corey Bennett (2009, T): Taylor Auditorium: Marsh 216@9:00 AM

Title: Overexposed: Revealing Personality Through Portrait Photography
Major(s): Art
Advisor(s): Flory
Abstract: I use portrait photography to preserve moments in time that reveal a bit of the individual’s character. By removing context, I hope to present a clear dialogue. Some of my photographs highlight strong personality and others feature subtle expression. I strive to expose a portion of the individual’s true self, but only a part they are willing to share. The results are natural and honest images of my subjects that I hope create a feeling of connection between my audience and my subjects.

Anna Benson (2008, T): Marsh 206@9:00 AM

Title: Shaping "Very Hard" Supreme Court Decisions
Major(s): Politics and Government
Advisor(s): Seward


Abstract: Lawrence v. Texas is a “very hard” case for justices to resolve. A “very hard” case means that no specific rule of law provides the answer to a particular case, and the background political morality is in dispute, causing judges to appeal to some broader political morality. One can see that there are many cleavages that divide the bench, such as Constitutional interpretive methods, culture wars, and the struggle between communitarian and individualist ideals. Using Lawrence v. Texas as a lens, what are the main political and philosophical factors that go into shaping a “very hard” Supreme Court decision?

Anders Benson (2011, T): Price 214@1:30 PM

Title: Comparison of Crystal Growth of Purified and Contaminated o-terphenyl
Major(s): Physics
Advisor(s): Hall
Abstract: The organic glass former, o-terphenyl (OTP), exhibits a unique form of fast crystal growth near its glass transition temperature. This fast growth mode, coined anomalous growth (AG), can be observed by quickly supercooling below a critical temperature of Tc=-23°C. When supercooled to temperatures above Tc normal crystal growth occurs, which is characterized by spherelitic growth. Recently, Xi et. al. reported new observations of OTP crystal growth.[1] They observed a highly filamentary growth at T=0°C that grew substantially faster than previous measurements of normal crystal at that temperature. In our previous work with OTP, we have observed fast, needle-like growth associated with bubbles in the liquid. To test whether contamination might explain Xi et. al.'s unusual observations, we compare the crystal growth of purified and contaminated OTP. [1] Hanmi Xi et al., J. Chem. Phys. 130, 094508 (2009)

Bonnie Berg (2014, T): Marsh 106@8:00 AM

Title: Critical Mass or Critical Miles? Effects On Student Belonging Scores
Major(s): Psychology
Advisor(s): Burns-Glover
Abstract: Students' sense of belonging in the classroom and campus are important predictors of college success. Prior research on homesickness has looked at physical distance as well as "critical mass" theories, which focus on proportion of minority students enrolled as mediators of adjustment to college life. Our data were collected from five academically and demographically similar sections of First Year Seminar at a small, liberal arts college (N=87). We adapted the Sense of Belonging [SOB] measure to create an 18 item scale reflecting "class belonging," "university belonging," "pedagogical caring," and "social acceptance." A "distance" measure was created to identify miles from home, and "critical mass" [CM] categories (0, 1) were created for ethnicity (>10%) and state (>10%) of the student population. Distance from home did not affect the overall SOB score. However, when subscales were analyzed, we found that "Class Belonging" approached significance (r=.17; p=.08) when the other subscales were held constant. Partial correlations for Miles from Home with Pedagogical Caring and Social Acceptance were negative and approached significance. The mean SOB scores for students with critical mass ethnicity was significantly higher (M=69.05, SD=9.0) than non CM ethnicity (M=61.7, SD= 8.49). The effect was significant (F=4.64; p=.035, eta2=.07). Students from CM States scored higher on summed Sense of Belonging (M=69.01; SD=9.19) while students who were not scored lower (M=56.33; SD=6.02). We found partial support for our last hypothesis that a higher degree of involvement in activities on campus would increase a student's SOB. Our results indicated that frequency of attending an "art gallery" was negatively correlated with total belonging (r=-.31), class belonging(r=-.29), social acceptance (r=-.31). Class belonging scores were positively associated with frequency of attending theater and music events (r=.28) and negatively with frequency of attending speakers' presentations (r=-.26). Results are discussed in the context of theories of involvement and engagement.

Danielle Bergeson (2013, T): Marsh 106@9:00 AM

Title: Through Their Eyes: Perspective Taking and Elementary Students
Major(s): Psychology
Advisor(s): Kleinknecht
Abstract: In collaboration with a local charter school, we are working on the creation of a unique, inclusive, empirically-based "Perspective Taking Booster Program". The program, created last year, was inspired by Selman's "Interpersonal Negotiation Strategies Model" and consists of three parts (1) Classroom activities, (2) Teacher Fast Facts and (3) Parent Suggestions. Our project focuses on the classroom activities portion of the program in which we are modifying the first draft of the program based on correspondent feedback. Activities mesh with regular curriculum and center on social-dilemma-scenarios requiring students to answer questions in the form of a worksheet, as well as engage in group discussion and acting out scenarios while reflecting on conflicting perspective with pro-socially-minded resolutions. In addition to modification of the program, we are pilot testing it in one third-fourth grade blend classroom. The piloting includes classroom observation and implementation of three specific activities. Pilot results are contained in the context of school reform and center on the benefits of developmentally appropriate teaching practices.

William Berk (2009, T): Price 203@3:00 PM

Title: Oncorhynchus mykiss: Its Cousins Through Cytochromes
Major(s): Bioinformatics
Advisor(s): Sardinia
Abstract: Cytochrome P450 enzymes are vital for life in hundreds of different ways, though there is still very much to discover about them. Likewise, the study of how species are interrelated is vast and ongoing. In an effort to contribute to both areas of science, this study aims to construct phylogenetic trees of differing fish species by comparing Cytochrome P450 1A genes in each species. Through this, we can learn more not only about how evolution has affected Oncorhynchus mykiss and its cousins, but also about how evolution has affected Cytochrome P450 enzymes. The DNA sequences were obtained by searching through NCBI databases and the phylogenetic trees were constructed with tools on the Biology Workbench.

David Berney (2013, T): Marsh 201@3:00 PM

Title: The Development of Multiple Working Identities in Police Officers
Major(s): Sociology
Advisor(s): Whitehead
Abstract: With violence overemphasized in American media, police officers are often the center of attention. In reality, however, being a police officer is far less dangerous than other local jobs. Here in Oregon the fishing and timber occupations result in death and injury exponentially more often than police, yet officers are oftentimes viewed as "heroic." This project is to identify whether or not police officers try to live up to these expectations, and how they view the actuality of the job. If there is a difference between reality and expectation, how do officers cope with this gap? The results of this study provide insight into a more personal side of police officers, their perception of self, and their coping mechanisms. Some of these mechanisms include intentional separation of work and home, and a more active pursuit of personal interests outside of work to preserve their "personal" identity.

Alyssa Berry (2010, T): Marsh 201@9:30 AM

Title: Freaks on TV: Modern Day Freak Shows
Major(s): Sociology
Advisor(s): Whitehead
Abstract: Historical freak shows consisted of people with disfiguring rare medical disorders (e.g. the wolf boys or the elephant man) performing as a sideshow act in circuses for profit and amusement. Today these freak shows are almost non-existent. However, they have evolved into a modern form of freak shows that you see every day. In American pop culture, people or “freaks” with medical deformities and oddities are exploited as a form of entertainment through TV’s medical mystery shows or daytime talk shows. This thesis compares and contrasts the ways in which the freak is constructed on scientific based, medical shows versus non-medical shows used solely for entertainment purposes. This was carried out by performing content analysis on both types of television shows and then applying Michel Foucault’s theoretical framework. The way in which these shows are perceived by the viewer reflects the underlying rules for acceptable behaviors in society and the ways in which “freaks” break these norms. Medical mystery shows use medical discourses to explain symptoms, diagnosis, and treatment and are viewed as freaks because they do not maintain the social norm of a presentable, healthy body. However, talk shows lack medical discourses and focus primarily on the emotional and personal aspect of their life, it is dramatized. Here they are freaks because they don’t maintain the norm of an appropriate lifestyle or physical presentation.

Lauren Berthold (2014, P): Strain Hall 3rd Floor@11:00 AM

Title: Antibiotic Resistance Factors in Clostridium difficile Infection
Major(s): Biology
Advisor(s): Nyerges
Abstract: Clostridium difficile is a gram-positive spore forming bacterium that has recently been labeled 'urgent' by the U.S. Center for Disease Control. The CDC reports that every year 250,000 people acquire C. difficile infections, 14,000 of those cases result in death. The hypervirulent strain of C. difficile resistant to fluoroquinolone antibiotics and has caused an increase in deaths from 2000 to 2007 by 400%. It's a major health threat due to its high recurrence rate, transmission via spores and its ability to be antibiotic resistant. C. difficile infection (CDI) rate of recurrence may not only be due to antibiotic resistance genes such as gyrA and ermB, but also to the increase of proton pump inhibitor (PPI) use, and the sporulation mechanism regulated by the spo0A protein. There was an increase in PPI prescriptions and decrease in antibiotic prescriptions between 1994-2004 to treat CDI, suggesting that PPIs like drugs are another threat that can alter the gut environment leading to C. difficile colonization. Spo0A, a DNA binding protein should be considered a target when pioneering new antibiotics because of its ability to initiate sporulation, causing relapse in CDI patients. Mutations in the ermB and gyrA genes were associated with 76% of erythromycin and 94% of clindamycin resistance in C. difficile strain 078. Alternative therapies such as fecal bacteriotherapy and bacteriophage therapy seem to be promising in the treatment of C. difficile infections and provide new directions for future research.

Jeff Bethke (2011, T): Marsh 206@2:30 PM

Title: Partisan Politics as a Mirage in the Partial Birth Abortion Act of 2003
Major(s): Politics and Government
Advisor(s): Boykoff
Abstract: In 2003 President George W. Bush signed into law a bill banning partial birth abortions. The politics of this bill are multi-faceted, with party affiliation having a smaller effect than one might expect. Although 70% of the American people approved of the bill, the surface media accounts are not congruent with this, which shows there are other factors involved. Variables such as the battle of language, power of polling, and a Senators' definition of constitutionality (and their view of the judicial branch) are the driving factors behind this bill. Using polling data, media accounts, and the Congressional Record, the bill's history is reconstructed in order to show that partisan politics were not as important as one might assume. John Kingdon's "policy window" applies unequivocally to this bill, showing that the bill was clearly relevant to all three process streams-problem recognition, policy generation, and politics.

Devan Bey (2014, T): Marsh 201@1:00 PM

Title: Proud to Be Salvadoran: Negotiating Salvadoran Immigrant Identity in the United States
Major(s): Anthropology
Advisor(s): Mahar
Abstract: Central American immigrants face a range of unique experiences that serve to isolate them not only from the Anglo-American mainstream, but also from other Hispanic groups in the United States. Immigrants from El Salvador specifically face a host of challenges, including a past haunted by politically sanctioned mass violence, scarce resources, and stereotypes which may prevent them from completely achieving their economic and social goals in the United States. By not being either Mexican (the dominant Latino culture and immigrant group recognized in the U.S.) nor fully assimilated into the white cultural landscape, Salvadorans are caught in between interests, in between stereotypes, leading to an unclear identity, or one of rejection, that may generate conflict in the process of identity formation. This investigation focuses on three external influences which can serve to confuse or strengthen the Salvadoran identity; political reception by the government of the United States, social and cultural reception by the diverse populations of the U.S., and globalization. The investigation contains in-depth interviews conducted with eight salvadoreños who reside in Los Angeles, California in order to discuss the process these immigrants undergo to negotiate a personal and cultural identity amongst a range of conflicting influences.

Devan Bey (2014, T): CLIC@8:30 AM

Title: Proud to be Salvadoran: Negotiating Salvadoran Immigrant Identity in the United States
Major(s): World Languages: Spanish
Advisor(s): Christoph
Abstract: Central American immigrants face a range of unique experiences that serve to isolate them not only from the Anglo-American mainstream, but also from other Hispanic groups in the United States. Immigrants from El Salvador specifically face a host of challenges, including a past haunted by politically sanctioned mass violence, scarce resources, and stereotypes which may prevent them from completely achieving their economic and social goals in the United States. By not being either Mexican (the dominant Latino culture and immigrant group recognized in the U.S.) nor fully assimilated into the white cultural landscape, Salvadorans are caught in between interests, in between stereotypes, leading to an unclear identity, or one of rejection, that may generate conflict in the process of identity formation. This investigation focuses on three external influences which can serve to confuse or strengthen the Salvadoran identity: political reception by the government of the United States, social and cultural reception by the diverse populations of the U.S., and globalization. The investigation contains in-depth interviews conducted with eight salvadoreños who reside in Los Angeles, California in order to discuss the process these immigrants undergo to negotiate a personal and cultural identity amongst a range of conflicting influences. Presentation in Spanish with handouts in English.

Luciana Bianco (2010, T): Library Conference@9:00 AM

Title: Color in Black & White
Major(s): Art
Advisor(s): Flory
Abstract: Bright colors in photographs really draw you in to the rest of the picture, but they can also stand-alone beautifully. For my senior project, I have literally isolated the brilliant colors within my photographs to portray their magnificence as they appear in every day life. Life is so chaotic that it often passes by in a blur. Through my photographs I would like people to stop and enjoy the beautiful colors that they are otherwise blind to.

Ryan Biasca (2011, T): Strain 121@2:00 PM

Title: Imperium Lite
Major(s): Computer Science
Advisor(s): Khoja
Abstract: While simple board games are fast and easy to play, more complex games can be tedious and time consuming to setup. Many board games are converted into computer games to speed up this setup process. Imperium Lite is a computer game based on the board game Twilight Imperium, which is an elaborate space-based strategy game where players battle to control the galaxy. In Imperium Lite, most of the time consuming aspects of the game, such as board setup and battle outcomes, are automated. This allows the players to focus on building ships, purchasing upgrades, and determining which planets to try and control. The game ends when a player controls six out of the eleven planets. Imperium Lite includes game saving and is playable over networked computers.

Ashley Billingsley (2012, T): Price 204@11:00 AM

Title: Predicting injury within a firefighting population: Looking through the lens of Andersen and William's stress and injury model
Major(s): Exercise Science
Advisor(s): Concepcion
Abstract: Background: The firefighting profession may be one of the most demanding professions both physically and mentally. Therefore, the physical and psychological risks become much greater when compared to other professions. Recent statistics show that in 2009 alone 78,150 firefighters incurred an injury in the line of duty (Karter & Molis, 2010). The daily duties of a firefighter are the physical precursors that can lead up to an injury, but the question becomes what are the psychological precursors that can serve as predictors of injury? Anderson and Williams' sport and injury model states that personality, the history of stressors particular to the individual and the coping resources utilized or available all plays a role in the individuals stress response to a potentially stressful situation. The individual's responds to the situation will also factor into the risk of injury (Williams & Andersen, 1998). Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine professional firefighter's level of stress, the history of stressors, and perceived level of social support to predict injury as assessed by days from normal daily function at work and home. Methods: Upon IRB approval, we recruited 104 currently employed firefighters or emergency responders primarily from the Portland Metro area to participate in this study. Seventy-six of those completed all questionnaires. They were asked to complete the following: (a) a demographics questionnaire, (b) the Impact of Event Scale- Revised, (c) the Peritraumatic Dissociative Experiences questionnaire, (d) the Social Provisions Scale, and (e) the Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Checklist- Civilian Version questionnaire. Results: A correlation revealed multiple significant relationships between Feelings of Social Support and characteristics of PTSD (avoidance behaviors, intrusive thoughts, and hyperarousal). A regression analysis did not support the theoretical model of stress predicting injury. Conclusion: The results of this study support the conclusion that the firefighters who experience a low sense of social support are more likely to engage in avoidance type behavior, exhibit intrusive behaviors and all in all have a high score regarding PTSD symptomology. The link between stress symptoms, social support and injury were not supported.

Alex Bing (2014, T): Berglund 232@8:30 AM

Title: The Effects of Stuttering on Interpersonal Relationships
Major(s): Sociology
Advisor(s): Eisen
Abstract: Stuttering is defined as a disorder in which the individual knows precisely what (s)he wishes to say, but cannot say it because of an involuntary repetitive prolongation or cessation of sound, which disrupts the rhythm of conversation. Conversation analysts have shown that "normal" conversation is governed by a set of rules that dictate speech patterns, turn-taking, and the flow of conversation. When a person stutters they interrupt the "normal" flow of conversation and may be stigmatized from not understanding the conversation due to the disruption of rhythm of speech. This study, through 7 semi-structured interviews with individuals who stutter, provides insights into these individuals daily lived experiences of being stigmatized for stuttering and coping with that stigma. The qualitative interviews suggests that a person's facial expressions and changes in behavior when interacting with someone who stutters often create a sense of anxiety for the individual who stutters and can result in more stuttering. The research also shows that individuals who stutter attempt to hide their disorder to avoid negative reactions that make them feel judged or incompetent. Overall, this study provides insights into how one's means of communication can serve as a stigma and have negative effects on one's identity.

Zach Bingaman (2009, T): McGill Auditorium@1:30 PM

Title: TF Industries Product Launch
Major(s): Media Arts: Integrated Media
Advisor(s): Geraci
Abstract: This project is a commission by TF Industries LLC to create product branding and a web site for their new product TurboMaid. As a new company, TF Industries has asked me to design a complete company image package including business cards, logos, and web site. During my presentation, I will share my strategies for designing to ADA web standards (Americans with Disabilities Act). ADA standards apply to any organization that receives government funding, private employers, state and local governments, employment agencies and labor unions. I will discuss the methodologies and approaches I used in all of my work for TF Industries. Anyone with an interest in web site design, project management, and/or marketing is encouraged to attend.

Michelle Bingaman (2010, T): Marsh 101@3:00 PM

Title: The Context of Plato
Major(s): Philosophy
Advisor(s): Boersema
Abstract: The Platonic dialogues serve as a launching point for any student of philosophy and are also a primary focus of advanced scholars. When examining the philosophical content of these dialogues, philosophers notice that when the dialogues are taken together there seems to be contradictions between them. For instance, in the Apology it is stated that we have no certain knowledge of the nature of death. However, in the Phaedo the nature of death is explicitly described. In order to resolve the problem of contradiction philosophers look at different modes of interpretation. I will be arguing for one mode of interpretation called the contextual approach in which the environments, actions, and purposes within the dialogues play a major role in determining the philosophical content and that these factors can resolve the problem of contradiction.

Zachary Binkerd (2013, T): Marsh 206@11:00 AM

Title: Captain America and Patriotic Manhood in the Early Cold War
Major(s): History
Advisor(s): Szefel
Abstract:  This paper examines ideas about American masculinity, patriotism, and youth culture during the early Cold War through the lens of the comic book Captain America. Beginning in 1941, Captain America battled Hitler and criminals, showcasing and promoting a heteronormative, nationalist ethos. However, with the emergence of a Comics Code Authority in 1954, in response to fears about juvenile delinquency, Captain America ceased publication. When "Cap" reappeared in 1964, he became a pop culture icon as a member of the avengers who fought communists. While Captain America's appearance and attitude did not change, the historical context in which he battled did. In the chaotic years of anti-establishment, anti-war activism, Captain America's staid figure symbolized nostalgia for simpler times and an old-fashioned patriotism and masculinity. Through an examination of the dialogue and drawings of Captain America, the creator behind the series, contemporary psychology, and gender norms, this thesis argues that comics such as Captain America served to instruct young, mostly male, readers on how to be strong, heroic, and confident in the midst of uncertain times and powerful enemies.

Travis Birrell (2011, T): Price 204@10:00 AM

Title: Heart Rate Monitors: Extending the Social Facilitation Framework
Major(s): Exercise Science
Advisor(s): Jackson
Abstract: There have been numerous studies testing the social facilitation framework in a variety of different conditions. For the most part, research supports the idea that the presence of another has a facilitative effect on the performance during simple tasks, whereas performance is hindered when the task is complex (Zajonc, 1965). Scientists have proposed various theories as to why this phenomenon occurs. The leading theories are uncertainty, evaluation apprehension, self-awareness, and distraction-conflict (Uziel, 2007). Each lends a slightly different mechanism that explains or accounts for the performance changes. In more recent years the social facilitation framework has been applied to electronic performance monitoring (e.g., computer monitoring in work settings) (Stanton and Barnes-Farrell, 1996), finding similar results to those of traditional research in regards to task complexity and performance facilitation. Would this effect be found with indirect methods of evaluation as well? Heart-rate monitors are commercially sold to personal fitness advocates to track heart-rate changes during exercise and over time. From the physiological standpoint, there is a direct relationship with heart-rate and aerobic fitness which can be used as a sort of evaluative presence in the form of a heart-rate monitor. Purpose: To investigate the effects that wearing a heart rate monitor has on the performance of an effort-based task. Methods: 38 Pacific University undergraduate students completed shuttle runs in each of four randomly-ordered conditions: Alone, Experimenter Present, Alone w/Heart Rate Monitor, and Experimenter Present w/Heart Rate Monitor. Participants' performance time was collected within each condition without their knowledge (to control for "evaluation"). Data Analyses: A 2X2 (Experimenter Presence X Heart Rate Monitor Presence) ANOVA was performed to determine the evaluative effects on task performance. Results & Conclusions: Will be presented as to the effects of social and electronic evaluation on the performance of an effort-based task.

Ashley Bishop (2009, T): Marsh 101@10:00 AM

Title: What do Students Think about the Amethyst Initiative?
Major(s): Psychology
Advisor(s): Island
Abstract: The purpose of this study is to empirically investigate student attitudes regarding the Amethyst Initiative. The Amethyst Initiative is a proposal drafted in July of 2008 by college chancellors and presidents from over one hundred institutions across the United States. The proposal lobbies for an “informed and unimpeded debate on the 21 year old drinking age” in an effort to challenge or rationalize as national community the existing legislation (National Minimum Drinking Age Act, 1984) for nation-wide adherence to the legal drinking age. This proposals underlying assumptions are that legalizing drinking for individuals 18 and over will reduce binge drink and that it will equalize the age of adulthood (i.e. voting rights, alcohol consumption, and military eligibility) to 18 years

Megan Blackstone (2007, T): Taylor-Meade: Art Division@10:30 AM

Title: The Importance of Music Education in Elementary Schools
Major(s): Music
Advisor(s): Tuomi


Abstract: Great importance is placed in elementary music education on developing musical interests and skills. Children who are not exposed to music education classes at an early age are less likely to engage in musical pursuits in their later education. Using data from the Cherry Creek School District in Colorado, which features music education programs at the elementary level, and the Beaverton School District in Oregon, which does not, I compared the difference in sight reading ability and percentage of student participation in beginning and intermediate choirs in high schools. Given the state of music education in many Oregon schools, I hope to show correlation between the effect of early musical education upon subsequent musical participation and ability.

Maria Violeta Blando (2014, T): Berglund 216@1:30 PM

Title: Online Publishing as a Motivational Tool for Student Writing
Major(s): Education
Advisor(s): Zijdemans Boudreau
Abstract: How does online publishing influence students' motivation to write? Does the idea of writing to a larger audience make students more inclined to write, and how does this affect the quality of their writing? The purpose of this project is to create an online publishing website for teachers at the Forest Grove Community School to utilize as a motivational tool in order to help children improve their writing skills (Karchmer, 2001). Our hope is to create an environment where students are eager to submit written work because of these factors: online publishing supports student learning, motivates them, and gives them a sense of audience (Castek, Mangelson, Goldstone 2006). Our research included triangulated data: pre and post-surveys, artifacts which included student's written submitted work, informal interviews with teacher and students, and in class observations. Pre-surveys were distributed to determine which elements should be incorporated into their website (i.e. theme design, website name and genre of writing) and to gauge their current motivation and confidence in their writing ability. Post surveys were done to assess the effectiveness of the online publishing site as well as any significant differences in students' motivation to write. Artifacts created by students were used as published works on the website. Student interviews were conducted to assess how they felt about publishing their work on the web and whether or not they thought it was a motivating factor. Teacher interviews were conducted to help determine the effectiveness of the website and any changes that needed to be made. All of these elements, including classroom observations, were analyzed for connections to the literature and used to inform the site development. We anticipate that our project will have a generally positive influence on students' motivation to write and the quality of their written work.

Matthew Blankenship (2010, T): Marsh 101@11:30 AM

Title: Footloose And Fancyfree: What Do We Know About Childfree Couples?
Major(s): Psychology
Advisor(s): Island
Abstract: To date, the bulk of the literature of reproductive refusal among committed couples focuses almost entirely on the explanations, rationalizations, stigma management, identity protection, and social justification of these couples for their lifestyle choice (e.g., Gillespie, 2000; 2003; Morrell, 2000; Park, 2002; Wagner, 2000). Additionally, within the heterosexual literature of voluntarily childless, dual-income couples, these studies take a decidedly femme-centric perspective, in most cases completely ignoring the male partner’s contribution to the decision and his experience in the social fallout. The purpose of this study is to provide a more holistic investigation of couples (both heterosexual and same-sex couples) that have elected to forgo parenting. The goal is to collect information on life satisfaction, marital (or commitment) satisfaction, goal achievement, financial and professional happiness, and the breadth of the social network that comprises this demographic of the population. Additionally, we will compare the scores on the New Environmental Paradigm Scale among voluntarily childfree couples and parenting couples, given some literature points to the concern of overpopulation as a contributor in the lifestyle decision (Campbell, 2000). A number of studies have already revealed a positive significant relationship between couples who postpone parenthood and perceived marital happiness (Freeman, 2008; Gilbert, 2008), the current study extends this investigation to those who forgo parenting altogether.

Dale Blem (2007, T): Strain 121@1:00 PM

Title: "The Logarithmic Derivative, What Is It Good For?"
Major(s): Mathematics
Advisor(s): Boardman


Abstract: The Logarithmic Derivative is the derivative of the natural log of a function d/dx(ln(f(x)) . This is more commonly expressed as the ratio f'/f . The logarithmic derivative is used in the fields such as Differential Equations and Number Theory. We investigate properties of the Logarithmic Derivative, first strictly as an operator, and then as it is applied to Newton's Method. We illustrate a Modified Newton's Method that uses a higher order logarithmic derivative. We show both algebraically and geometrically that this Modified Newton's Method can converge more quickly than the classical Newton's Method.

Alexa Block (2013, T): Taylor Auditorium: Marsh 216@4:00 PM

Title: Backpack journalism
Major(s): Media Arts: Journalism
Advisor(s): Cassady
Abstract: The project was an exercise in 'backpack journalism'. The stories, which focus on what is going on around campus, from athletics to student life, were shot, written and edited by me. There is a range of story topics. There is an in-depth look at the world of athletics at Pacific through player profile pieces. There are topics such as study space in the library during finals, working students on campus and campus issues such as race and diversity. The point of the project is to not only work on reporting skills and configuring a news story but to reveal something about the Pacific community. It strives to give Pacific students and faculty an outlet to tell their stories and show their connection to the University and to help people explore Pacific through the various pieces. The project involved finding interesting story subjects and topics, and putting them in a news form. It included interviewing subjects, shooting the interviews and the accompanying "b roll", writing the stories, recording sound and editing each piece.

Arianna Blunt (2014, T): Price 214@1:30 PM

Title: Diana: Goddess and Demon
Major(s): History
Advisor(s): Rampton
Abstract: In the pre-Christian, Roman world Diana was a goddess of the hunt, the woodlands, childbirth, healing and the moon. She was unmarried and independent. With the development of Christianity, the cultural and religious elite came to see the pagan, non-Christian, deities as malicious demons. While the importance of most of the pagan deities, now demons, faded with the increasing dominance of Christianity, Diana maintained a presence in the culture of the early Middle Ages. She remained particularly threatening to the Christian Church. I argue that the persistence of her threatening nature was because she maintained the attributes ascribed to her in the Roman period. She remained an unmarried and independent female in a world where women were meant to be married and submissive to their husbands.

Abigail Boardman (2012, T): Marsh 106@9:00 AM

Title: No Girl Left Behind, Part II: Vertical Mentoring and Feminist Participatory Action Research
Major(s): Psychology
Advisor(s): Burns-Glover
Abstract: We will present a FPAR analysis (program evaluation, field notes, and media products) of a one-day event that is designed to promote 12-15 year old girls' self-confidence, communication skills, and academic aspirations. We collaborated with the Center for Gender Equity to provide the day's events and designed their program evaluation. We discuss how we used social, feminist, and developmental theories to design activities and promote discussions of media images; self-confidence, and peer communication. Part I will discuss the emerging research on the importance of providing 'hardiness zones' to girls in the form of female adult mentors and how it influenced our design of the GIRLS TODAY conference ("Giving her a break from the world"); in Part II ("Vertical mentoring and FPAR") we will discuss how the graduate students collaborated with undergraduates to design the activities and facilitations. Post-event survey results demonstrated that the program was a) effective in building girls' self-confidence; b) well-liked by the girls, and c) perceived as effective by the graduate mentors. We discuss our suggestions for future GIRLS TODAY conferences, and opportunities for graduate and undergraduate collaborations in mentoring girls.

Jordan Bodily (2012, P): Strain Hall 3rd Floor@1:00 PM

Title: Heredity as an etiological factor for palatally displaced canines
Major(s): Biology
Advisor(s): Lopez
Abstract: The maxillary canine is arguably the tooth with the most varied disposition in the entire human dentition. This tooth sometimes forms outside of its normal position in the dental alveolar process and may emerge palatally, a positional anomaly known as a palatally displaced canine (PDC). The origin of PDC is unknown, but is generally thought to be a result of environmental factors such as crowding of the dentition. A growing body of scientific evidence suggests that PDC is under genetic control, much like other heritable dental anomalies PDC is tightly associated with. These conflicting ideas have given rise to two opposing hypotheses for the origin of PDC: The guidance hypothesis and the genetic origin hypothesis. In this project, data gathered from multiple published sources are analyzed and integrated to address the question: Are palatally displaced canines a dental anomaly of genetic origin? Five evidential categories for the genetic control of PDC originally put forth by Peck et al. (1994) are evaluated: 1. Occurrence of other dental anomalies concomitant with PDC as is it frequently associated with tooth agenesis and hypodontia, 2. Bilateral occurrence of PDC since prevalence rates of bilateralism found in dental anomalies of known genetic control appear analogous to that of PDC, 3. Sex differences in PDC occurrence as the anomaly is found twice as often in females than it is males 4. Familial occurrence of PDC considering phenotypic expression through multiple generations can provide insight to genetic linkage and mode of inheritance, and 5. Population differences in PDC occurrence seeing that the rate of PDC occurrence varies considerably between races, ethnicities and isolated subpopulations. Biological evidence indicates the PDC anomaly is of polygenic, multifactorial inheritance.

Whitney Bohlin (2013, T): CLIC@11:30 AM

Title: Title: ESPERE Chicas: Conflict resolution education at work in the Forest Grove Latina community
Major(s): World Languages: Spanish
Advisor(s): Christoph
Abstract: We cannot escape the glaring reality of conflict, but we can determine a positive method of dealing with it. From domestic disputes to guerilla warfare the conflict resolution program ESPERE has been working to foster peace through forgiveness and reconciliation since 2003. Locally, this program functions to bring self esteem and conflict management skills to low income Latina women through the nonprofit organization, Adelante Mujeres. Together we recognized the need for an adolescent conflict resolution class for their youth development program, Adelante Chicas. In response I adapted and facilitated an eight week introductory course of ESPERE that focused on gender and culture norms of conflict. I will be presenting my experiences and observations with these young women and what the future of conflict resolution holds in regards to culture and gender.

Tyler Bokuniewicz (2012, T): Berglund 200@12:00 PM

Title: Finding Earnhardt
Major(s): English: Creative Writing
Advisor(s): Vaisburd
Abstract: Finding Earnhardt is the comedic story of a young Southern man named Trevor who seeks a way out of an unsatisfying life where he is forced to work a low level job at Subway in the dead end town of Kingston, Tennessee. Trevor is hindered by Roger, his dead-beat dad who does little other than stay at home and drink. Trevor finds a way to get out of town in a set of keys belonging to the car of the late Dale Earnhardt, but Trevor has only the keys, and not the car, though it is rumored by a local historian that the car is somewhere within the town. Together along with his friend Jesse Barry, and his ally by circumstance, Go-Kart Guy, Trevor searches Kingston for Dale Earnhardt's car, knowing that the car's incredible value will be his ticket out of town and his unsatisfactory life. An avid Coen Brothers fan, senior Creative Writing student Tyler Bokuniewicz draws on film scripts such as The Big Lebowski and Fargo as well as his studies at Pacific in order to craft a script which blends humor and drama together. In his presentation, Tyler will have a scene from his script acted out, and will discuss his process of writing both in terms of preplanning and the writing itself and will also go over some of the themes he hoped to explore with his screenplay.

Randy Bolick (2011, T): Price 202@1:30 PM

Title: Firefighters & Physical Fitness Assessment
Major(s): Exercise Science
Advisor(s): Henry
Abstract: Level of fitness is a good indicator of the level of performance one can achieve in a physical task. Due to environmental and physical demands, occupations such as firefighting require a relatively high degree of physical fitness. For fire fighters to remain healthy and injury free in such a physically demanding work environment, they must obtain and maintain an appropriate level of individual fitness. The purpose of this study was to provide a service to the active firefighters of Hillsboro Fire Department, and to help establish a baseline of physical fitness for the recruitment class of August 2010. Each of the four participants underwent a series of physical assessment tests that are congruent with the established guidelines outlined in the Wellness Fitness Initiative. These tests assessed each participant in the five key components of fitness: Muscular Strength, Muscular Endurance, Aerobic Fitness, Flexibility, and Body Composition. Data will be utilized for establishing a baseline of physical fitness for the fire department, although individual participant data will remain confidential and not released to either the department or the public. Each participant received their own assessment scores, including relevant comparisons to norms and criterion-referenced standards. Composite data of a non-confidential nature will be presented to Hillsboro Fire Department and Pacific University during Senior Projects Day.

Jennifer Boling (2010, T): Price 202@2:30 PM

Title: Does Transition and/or Cognitive Processing Time Influence the Contextual Interference Effect?
Major(s): Exercise Science
Advisor(s): Jackson
Abstract: Research has shown that when learning multiple skills, practicing those skills in a random order results in greater performance in retention than practicing the skills in a repetitive or blocked order (termed the Contextual Interference or CI Effect). Unfortunately, in many real-world learning environments (e.g., PE class), switching from task to task randomly would require more overall time than performing the skill repetitively. Therefore, it is not known whether the benefits of random practice are due to the schedule itself, or the additional processing time that the schedule may provide. Purpose: This study examined the effect that inter-trial time (i.e., transition and/or cognitive processing time) has on performance under blocked and random practice schedules, as well as the effects that those practice schedules have on self-paced inter-trial time. Methods: Participants learned three dart throwing tasks under either a Blocked (B) or Random (R) practice schedule. Half of each practice schedule condition was further divided into a Self-Regulated (SR) or Experimenter Regulated (ER) practice conditions. During practice SR groups were instructed to begin the task as soon as they were ready after hearing which task they were to perform, while ER groups performed the task on the count of three after being told which task to perform. Under a self-regulated schedule, participants were tested before practice (pre-test), following practice (post-test), after a 20-minute break (retention test), and on a novel dart task (transfer test). Analyses: The time taken to perform each of the practice blocks was recorded and analyzed for differences using an ANOVA. An average of participant’s pre, post and retention tests were also recorded, and analyzed via a 3X4 repeated measures ANOVA. Results: The Random/Self-Regulated group took significantly longer time in between trials than the Blocked/Self-Regulated group. In terms of performance, for those who were able to self-regulate, the random group outperformed the blocked group at the post-test, whereas no significant differences were found between blocked and random groups for the experimenter regulated conditions on any test. as used to analyze for differences in the performance of all groups for all tasks. indepentent d a transfer test with a Conclusion: The results of this study support the hypothesis that Random practice participants take significantly more time between trials than do Blocked practice participants when they are allowed to self-regulate (as they have been in most CI research). The results further suggest that the extra time may play a part in the performance differences between the two groups. In self-regulated groups there was a performance difference between blocked and random groups that is consistent with a standard CI effect. However, when both groups were required to take the same amount of inter-trial time in the experimenter-regulated conditions, those effects are non-existent. It is suggested that random practice is not as beneficial as originally thought, and is only more effective when learners are able to self-regulate their practice trials.

Denise Bolzle (2008, T): Taylor Auditorium: Marsh 216@10:00 AM

Title: Effect of Astrological Sun Sign on Personality
Major(s): Psychology
Advisor(s): Schultz


Abstract: The purpose of this study was to examine whether there was a correlation between personality and astrological sun sign. The sample consisted of 13 male and 59 female undergraduate students from Pacific University. Participants were given a questionnaire that asked them to rate themselves on 120 personality traits. Each of the traits corresponded to each of the twelve zodiac signs. The adjectives were gathered using several different books on astrology. Results of the study will be discussed and interpreted.

Kristin Bone (2007, T): Marsh 212@1:00 PM

Title: Kiss of Immortality: A Search for the Real Helen of Troy
Major(s): English: Literature
Advisor(s): Steele


Abstract: "Ask me for a true image of human existence," wrote the Roman, Seneca, " and I will show you the sack of a great city. Over three-thousand years ago, ancient Greece gathered the largest fighting force the world had ever seen to attack its greatest opponents, the soldiers of Troy. An entire generation of heroes drew their last breath before the impenetrable walls of the famous city, all for the sake of one woman. Helen, a Spartan queen destined to become a Trojan Princess, is a name widely known throughout western and eastern lands alike, but who was she really? This thesis attempts to answer that question by examining several different views of the famous princess: that of the Greek goddess born of prophesy, that of the Trojan Whore, and that of the fairest woman the world shall ever know.

Christina Bonilla (2008, T): Marsh 201@2:30 PM

Title: Sex Offenders: Effectiveness of Condition Release Agreements and Rehabilitation
Major(s): Social Work
Advisor(s): Doerfler


Abstract: Research has suggested that rehabilitated juveniles who have committed sex offenses are less likely to re-offend sexually if the youth is placed in treatment appropriate for his/her crime, rather than institutionalized. Further, youth viewed as sexual offenders, rather than as persons with a mental illness, are more likely to receive effective intervention. As a result of these research findings, juvenile departments, detention facilities and treatment agencies have opted to focus on the implementation of Condition Agreements for sexually offending youth who are released into the community, in addition to rehabilitation for those with chronic deviant behaviors. This capstone project has focused on four urban county comparisons regarding Best Practice Approach when rehabilitating and treating juvenile sex offenders in the state of Oregon. The four urban counties include Multnomah County, Marion County, Clackamas County and Washington County.

Max Bonk (2011, T): McGill Auditorium@3:00 PM

Title: Designing an Environmentally Friendly Non-profit Golf Course
Major(s): Environmental Studies w/ Sustainable Design Emphasis
Advisor(s): Van Buskirk
Abstract: The District of South Kohala on the Big Island of Hawaii is located in a very dry and fragile landscape. Through the actions of humans, its diverse native dry forest has been replaced with a species-poor assortment of introduced species that are of little value to wildlife. I have designed an environmentally friendly golf course as the centerpiece of a non-profit organization that will help to restore this degraded landscape. The design will blend the layout of the course with the natural landscape in order to eliminate the need for massive land alteration and greatly reduce the resources required for installation and maintenance. The goal of this project is to provide an affordable public golf course for the benefit of the west side of Hawaii while generating revenue for the restoration of this degraded landscape. The site of this project is a 150-acre plot located near the Kamuela airport that has been cleared of native dry forest for many years for the production of cattle by the Parker Ranch. My project will use golf course design to make an argument for a new use of this site that offers a type of recreation highly valued by people in this region while restoring this rare and environmentally valuable landscape.

Gregory Boone (2010, T): Taylor Auditorium: Marsh 216@9:30 AM

Title: Real
Major(s): Media Arts: Film and Video Production
Advisor(s): Hardacker
Vaisburd
Abstract: “Real” is a film that not only explores the relationship between two brothers but also our relationships with peers and the troubling manner in which they shape us regardless of whether we want them to or not. “Real” is a 15-minute narrative film that encapsulates my education as a Film/Video major while also integrating knowledge acquired through my Psychology minor. The final product will be a short film I am able and proud to enter in film festivals around the country if not the world. The project is a chance to exhibit the skills I have acquired in the form of an art piece that I will be able to use as a work sample in my pursuit of building a career in the Film and Television industry. Not only does this project allow me to exhibit the knowledge I already have but it also requires I learn more through my experiences and process.

Pamela Booth (2010, T): McGill Auditorium@1:00 PM

Title: Virtual Water: Quantitative Analysis of the Water Content in International Trade
Major(s): Economics
Advisor(s): Haag
Abstract: The theory of virtual water says that every product has a certain volume of water used in its production that is transferable through trade. This transference is said to alleviate water scarcity issues in the importing country. Studies on the theory of virtual water have been around for only a few decades. For this reason, there is limited data quantifying virtual water trade. Hoekstra and Hung (2002) present a model to estimate a nation’s net virtual water trade through data on specific agricultural product’s trade volume, water requirements, and climate conditions. It is from this model that they also create a water scarcity index to measure a nation’s water use relative to water availability. This index provides a ratio that can be used for comparison between nations and time periods. Over the last decade trade patterns, economic policies, and water usage have changed in the world. This analysis replicates the Hoekstra and Hung methodology for the current time period to examine how water scarcity has impacted global trade patterns.

Nolan Booth (2012, T): Berglund 232@2:00 PM

Title: Rough Housing to an "A"
Major(s): Education
Advisor(s): Nelson
Abstract: The purpose of our project is to investigate developmental, social, physical, and academic benefits that may be aided or enhanced through rough-and-tumble play. The investigation took place at The Early Learning Community at Pacific University (ELC). Data collected included parent surveys, teacher questionnaires, pictures, videos, and 36 hours of field notes all focusing on children 3-6 years of age. The data collected was analyzed and coded based on themes found in the review of the literature. Themes used for the data analyses included (a) developmental benefits, (b) gender differences, and (c) assessment and regulation. Our critical questions included the following. How do boys and girls attention, concentration, and focus levels change prior to rough-and-tumble play and after rough-and-tumble play? How does talk and language regarding problem solving and conflict resolution, among the children, develop through rough-and-tumble play? What can teachers do to facilitate rough-and-tumble play in order to maximize learning and physical potential?

Nica Borders Chagolla (2013, T): Berglund 139@11:00 AM

Title: Crafting the Magical Universe of Young Adult Paranormal Romance
Major(s): English: Creative Writing
Advisor(s): Lang
Abstract: Once upon a time there is a world like ours but different. It has magic and monsters. It is in quiet peril, hidden from mortal eyes, yet so on the brink of disaster that everyone will be pulled down if it fails. This is the world most young adult paranormal romance stories start with. The place can be recognizable to contemporary readers as similar to the setting of today, but it will also be markedly different in crucial ways. Creating that hybrid world has been my challenge as I wrote the opening section of my young adult novel, A Knight's Duty. How to naturally impart a fictional location to the reader is always a difficult task for a writer. When setting up an alternate universe, the author will have to use all her skills. While working on this opening section of the book, I honed my craft through trial and error and benefitted from the study of techniques established by practitioners of this genre. In the critical portion of my thesis, I examine how authors Maureen Johnson, Laini Taylor and Kiersten White achieved these goals in their respective novels.

Michael Borel (2009, T): Taylor Auditorium: Marsh 216@3:00 PM

Title: Articulate
Major(s): Art
Advisor(s): O'Day
Abstract: My artwork consists of a series of graphite pencil drawings. They represent real people and concepts in my life, but are depicted as fantastical creatures borne solely from my imagination. My ultimate goal for this senior show was to create art that is macabre and unsettling, yet beautiful and intriguing. My work will be featured in a collective senior show called “Articulate”.

Michelle Bose (2011, T): Berglund 230@8:30 AM

Title: Photographic Feeling; Breaking Down the Basics
Major(s): Art
Advisor(s): Flory
Abstract: A feeling can be defined as a general impression conveyed by a person, place, or thing. When it comes to observing at photography, you tend to generate a variety of feelings based off of what type of image you are looking at. My project revolves around the study of color and black and white and how the different elements of primary colors and the lack of colors create general emotions within us. I want to educate my audience on why a particular photograph may make them feel a certain way by using concepts of how our brain responds to contrasting elements and historical examples of how artists use this to their advantage.

Kali Bose (2014, T): Price 214@8:00 AM

Title: The LeClair Affair: A Conflict of Gender and Generation in 1968
Major(s): History
Advisor(s): Jobs
Abstract: In March 1968 Barnard College erupted into scandal when Linda LeClair was discovered to be living off campus with her boyfriend against school policies. What should have been a quiet matter for the College turned into a national media storm where the private became public and the issues of a decade played out for the country to witness. During the clash between students and administration it becomes clear that the way the country thought of institutional control, female sexuality, and generation was on the precipice of a change that continues to impact students today.

Ryan Bourgaize (2014, T): Price 204@1:30 PM

Title: Verification of the Hubble Space Telescope battery cell design by chemical analysis
Major(s): Chemistry
Advisor(s): Whiteley
Abstract: In 2009 the Hubble Space Telescope was serviced to replace the six batteries that had been on board for over seventeen years. Pacific University received three of these cells from NASA in order to perform chemical analysis to determine whether or not the cell design was effective. Two of the cells were cycled over 100,000 times in orbit, while the third cell, the "virgin" cell, was tested only on earth, placed inside the telescope, but never used in orbit. Previous work has been done on the two cycled cells, and to complete the analysis of the design, work has been done on the un-cycled cell to distinguish between cycling and temporal effects.

Brett Bousquet (2010, T): Price 214@1:00 PM

Title: Effect of Foot Structure on Landing Ground Reaction Force Characteristics
Major(s): Exercise Science
Advisor(s): Schot
Abstract: Structural characteristics of feet can vary greatly, which may lead to problems in other areas of the body. Two characteristics of foot posture that have been suspected of being a source of many foot, ankle, and knee injuries are the medial longitudinal arch height and rear-foot angle. These structural features may contribute to large and/or unusually directed forces which are thought to contribute to injury. Purpose: Because so many injuries are associated with landing from jumps, the aim of this project was to examine the effects of foot structure on ground reaction forces experienced in single leg drop landings. Methods: Participants performed 10 landings from a 45 cm box onto each leg. Ground reaction forces were recorded at 1000 Hz with a force platform system. Data from thirty-two healthy legs were placed into a two-dimensional classification matrix based upon the rear-foot angle (pronated or neutral) and arch height (high or low). Analysis: Peak impact force, average loading rate, leg-spring stiffness, eccentric time and time to stability features of landing were extracted with interactive software for each landing trial. To examine the potential consequences of foot structure, the 10 trial means for each leg were analyzed via a 2 (arch height) x 2 (rear-foot angle) ANOVA (a=.05). Results: Unavailable at the time abstracts were due.

Matthew Bowe (2010, T): Price 202@10:30 AM

Title: A Comparison Of Forces Among Three Different Elbow Strikes
Major(s): Exercise Science
Advisor(s): Henry
Abstract: Few scientific research studies have focused on the efficacy of different martial arts striking techniques. Although this lab previously investigated peak forces of six martial arts strikes, this study focuses on the strongest striking method found in the previous study: elbow strikes. The two types previously studied were forward and reverse (out-to-in) elbows. This study analyzed those two, with the addition of a mount-position elbow strike that is common in mixed martial arts. Additionally, the current study included a greater diversity of martial art practitioners. PURPOSE: To further investigate peak forces (N) of three different martial arts elbow strikes (forward, reverse, and mount-position). METHODS: A custom-built striking apparatus, consisting of a digital force transducer instrumented with a computer data acquisition system, was constructed to measure the peak force of the strikes. In random and repeated design, participants (n = 21; 5 female, 16 male; age 34± 10 yrs) executed 15 elbow strikes per arm per technique (45 strikes total each arm with rest in between). RESULTS: Repeated measures one-way ANOVA revealed significant differences amongst the three strikes. Bonferroni post-hoc revealed mount elbow (2267.3 ± 806.3 N) to have greater peak force than the other two elbow strikes. However, reverse elbow (1859.5 ± 720.4 N) and forward elbow (1859 ± 720 N) were not found to be different from each other. CONCLUSIONS: With regard to peak force, mount-position elbow strikes are superior to the forward and reverse techniques performed from standing position. Nonetheless, peak force is only one variable to be considered when comparing strikes. Additional factors dictating the effectiveness of a particular strike include positioning, range, accuracy, applicable targets, and timing considerations.

Brian Bowe (2014, T): Berglund 230@8:30 AM

Title: Social Media Research and Strategy Implementation
Major(s): Business
Advisor(s): Griffie
Abstract: Our group project deals with Social media Research and Implementation for Centro Cultural de Washington County. We are focusing on implementing a strong social media presence to promote Centro's diverse education and support programs. Through this we are hoping to increase public awareness and interest in voluntary efforts and community involvement at Centro Cultural. We strongly believe public awareness through our social media campaign will increase Centro's goals of educational turnout and increases donations from the Washington County community.

Katie Bowen (2008, T): Berglund 200@11:30 AM

Title: The Meaning Beneath the Words: A Pedagogical Perspective on Holocaust Literature
Major(s): English: Literature
Advisor(s): Thompson


Abstract: Educators who teach a Holocaust unit in their classrooms often face challenges as they embark on the details of this atrocious time. A tool readily at hand to help address that challenge is Holocaust literature. While many educators choose to study major works, such as “Diary of Anne Frank” and “Night,” the array of choices is increasing as more writers begin to use the Holocaust as a theme in their work. This presentation explores the problem with using such literature and also provides ways in which educators can better handle students’ struggles with reading survivor narratives.

Jonathan Bowler (2010, T): Price 203@1:30 PM

Title: Sustainable Urban Solutions to Global Water Quality and Availability through Harvest, Treatment and Reuse
Major(s): Environmental Studies
Advisor(s): Van Buskirk
Abstract: The Pacific Northwest region of the United States is home to a vibrant, lush ecosystem. The abundant water resources and mild climate which allow for the natural splendor can lead to the belief that sustainable water use is not a high priority. In the northwest the majority of our precipitation falls during the winter months leading to hot dry summers in which water availability is dependant on the ability to store and use water efficiently. Although modern resource management has increased the ease with which we access clean water, technology and our consumption habits have led to global decreases in both water availability and quality. The idea of “think globally, act locally” means that humans in seemingly water rich areas need to be aware of diminishing water resources and the potential global water crisis that we face today. This presentation focuses on sustainable technologies that when implemented by individuals into domestic design can help to integrate human societies into sustainable ecological systems. Rainwater harvest, grey water treatment, hydroponic growth and aquaculture are intensive solutions to freshwater conservation that carry the added benefit of local food production. These technologies offer accessible solutions at the individual level to the increasing global water crisis. Sustainable design technology requires integration with and understanding of natural processes. The research and implementation of accessible, sustainable water use conducted in this study focuses on the issues related to water quality and availability while offering proactive solutions to resource conservation through water harvest, purification and reuse. Implementing bio-mimicry of ecologic function and nutrient cycling into human-created, home-scale technology offers the opportunity to become an integrated steward of our most precious yet mismanaged resource.

Denise Bowman (2014, T): Berglund 139@8:30 AM

Title: The Chosen Landscape
Major(s): English: Creative Writing
Advisor(s): Mitra
Abstract: My creative writing thesis includes the opening section of The Chosen Landscape, a novel that juxtaposes my experiences of displacement from my life in the Willamette Valley with my subsequent growth in the high plains desert of south-central Oregon through a fictionalized narrative and characters. The novel, told from a third-person point of view, explores the physical and emotional journey of the central character, Nicole, as she navigates the two landscapes. As her health declines, so does her marriage. Hoping the change of environment will help, Nicole and her husband buy a "fixer-upper" in a rural town on the opposite end of the state; before long, she begins to lose her sense of self and place in her marriage and life. I chose to write this narrative in fiction rather than non-fiction in order to allow all the characters their own viewpoints and voices, rather than solely concentrating on an account of my perception of the experience. In this novel, I want to expose readers to a "coming of age" story with the protagonist's growth, development, and mental or emotional maturation through challenges and obstacles that occur later in life than normally associated with this type of genre. By writing the story as a novel rather than a series of short stories, I am broadening my skills by developing deeper characters with more complex relationships.

Alexander Bowring (2008, T): Strain 121@1:00 PM

Title: xanTunes: A Networked Media Player
Major(s): Computer Science
Advisor(s): Khoja


Abstract: xanTunes is a networked media player application perfect for parties or shared living spaces. A single server is responsible for playing music through its soundcard, while many clients upload music to the server. Anyone can connect to a running server with another computer and use the xanTunes client to contribute music from his or her own library. The server plays all the music it receives, but changes the order, grouping similar songs together to make a more listenable playlist.

Andrew Bragg (2014, T): Strain 121@8:30 AM

Title: CRACKTCHA
Major(s): Computer Science
Advisor(s): Khoja
Abstract: CAPTCHAs have recently become a standard in preventing robot attacks on web services. The value of a protected resource creates an incentive to use artificial intelligence to decode the CAPTCHA protecting it. CRACKCHA reduces the effects of distortion transformations upon an image in order to increase the accuracy at which AI is able to recognize characters.

Mariya Brannon (2012, P): Price 1st Floor Hallway@1:00 PM

Title: Effect of Drop Distance Control Methods on Select Features of Landing Kinetics
Major(s): Exercise Science
Advisor(s): Schot
Abstract: Experimental control is crucial for scientific investigation. Scientists attempt to regulate all characteristics of the experiment to ensure the independent variable(s) are the sole influence(s) acting on the dependent variable(s). Mechanisms of injury are a major theme in kinesiology, thus the measurement of stresses during exercise must be accurate and precise. In order to detect the small differences that may eventually lead to injury, study protocols must minimize variability appropriately. Drop distance control when using landings is critical; inconsistencies in drop distance (DD) regulation may exert greater influence than the independent variable of interest. Purpose: To determine the influence of drop distance and its regulation methods on the magnitude and variability of variables commonly associated with injury formation in activities that involve landings. Methods: 14 volunteers performed 15 one-legged landings from an elevated platform and an overhead bar from 30 and 45 cm (a total of 60 landings). Legs were functionally classified as kicking or support and randomly selected for use at one of the DD levels (resulting in 30 landings per leg total). The mean and standard deviation for contact velocity, peak force, loading rate and time to stability were calculated for each method/distance condition for each subject and analyzed via a 2x2 repeated-measures ANOVA (α=0.05). Results: Findings will be delivered during the presentation.

Jeff Brass (2010, T): Library Conference@9:30 AM

Title: Here Today, Gone Tomorrow
Major(s): Art
Advisor(s): Flory
Abstract: Photography is an artistic medium that captures the natural world in all of its beauty and glory. Now, more than ever, the natural world is changing, and photography is becoming increasingly vital. Water plays a major role in my photography because it is an essential part of all life on Earth and is also heavily impacted by the presence of people. In addition, it shows the range of beauty in photography, by either emphasizing clarity in a subject, or reflecting the passing of time, by use of longer exposure times. I have developed my landscape photography around my interest in the environment, as well as my love of photographic art, drawing my inspiration from great artists such as Ansel Adams and Vern Bartley, with whom I share an interest in both nature and the technical aspects of photography. My goal is to capture brilliant scenes in nature, before they are gone.

Lacee Braun (2007, T): Price 214@2:00 PM

Title: Lower Extremity Functional Responses of Weight-Matched Men and Women
Major(s): Exercise Science
Advisor(s): Schot


Abstract: Background: Women are up to eight times more likely to sustain an anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture than men who participate in the same sports. Due to the disproportionate incidence among women, this injury has been a topic of interest for gender comparison studies. However, these studies need to be developed further by eliminating anthropometric variables that may affect the results. Most ACL injuries occur in non-contact situations where rapid decelerations are employed, such as landing after a jump. Also many of these injuries occur during later phases of games and practices, suggesting that fatigue may play a crucial role. Purpose: The purpose of this project was to examine the effects of fatigue on lower extremity functional responses for weight-matched men and women. Methods: Approximately 10 pairs of weight-matched men and women performed a series of landings from a 60 cm box. Subjects stepped off a box, landing with both feet on the force platform. These landings were performed before and after a fatigue protocol consisting of 3 sets of leg extensions to failure using a load equal to 50% of individual body weight. Analysis: The effects of gender (a between-subject factor) and fatigue (a within-subject factor) on peak force and stiffness were evaluated via ANOVA.

Sarah Braun (2009, T): Marsh 106@4:00 PM

Title: The Economic Impact of Pacific University
Major(s): Economics
Advisor(s): Ruder
Abstract: Pacific University clearly has a large impact Forest Grove economy, though the economic effects of the University’s many activities is difficult to quantify in dollar terms. The University has similar economic impact in Hillsboro, and Eugene during recent years. This study evaluates the aggregate impact of Pacific University’s activities on the economy of the State of Oregon in 2008 by examining short- and long-run economic and fiscal impacts associated with the provision of higher education by the University. This study applies multipliers specific to narrow categories of spending to project Pacific University’s economic impact on the State of Oregon from detailed information on the University’s operating budget.

Evan Bredeweg (2008, T): Price 204@3:30 PM

Title: Territorial Behavior of Wild and Captive Juvenile Tuatara (Sphenodon) and its Implications for Conservation
Major(s): Environmental Science
Advisor(s): Van Buskirk


Abstract: The Tuatara (Sphenodon) is a unique and endangered animal that is endemic to New Zealand. Of the four orders of extant reptiles, they alone represent the entire order of Sphenodontia. The tuatara possess several morphological characteristics that exist in no other extant reptiles, making them very valuable to the study of reptilian and vertebrate evolution. As a result of human colonization and the introduction of exotic species, the tuatara that once ranged throughout both main islands of New Zealand is now threatened with extinction and is restricted to several small offshore islands. In order to preserve this animal, conservation biologists collect, incubate, and rear juvenile tuatara for a period of five years. For juvenile tuatara, which become territorial at six months of age, the markedly different environment in captivity may impact their subsequent success after release. In order to clarify the territorial nature of juvenile tuatara, I argue that the study of territorial behavior in wild juvenile tuatara is needed to determine the conditions under which they naturally mature. I also reason that the study of the captive-raised tuatara is essential to determine the impacts of this artificial housing regime on the territory holding power in released juveniles. These projects will not only expand the knowledge of tuatara biology but will also provide critical information for the improvement of the tuatara’s captive-rearing program.

Jeffrey Breitenfeldt (2008, T): Berglund 200@1:30 PM

Title: Kill the Indian and Lose the Man: Ideological Alienation in N. Scott Momaday?s House Made of Dawn
Major(s): English: Literature
Advisor(s): Thompson


Abstract: N. Scott Momaday’s Pulitzer Prize winning novel, House Made of Dawn, in its portrayal of the American Indian’s struggle with cultural duality, is a difficult narrative to explain through conventional literary analysis. In any effort to understand the complex nature of this important novel, exploration of the characters must reflect the consciousness that separates them from both their traditions and integration into non-Indian society. In economic, legal, and religious examples, House Made of Dawn portrays experiences that expose complex relations of power at the cultural level where dominant ideologies either achieve hegemony or cause alienation. It is this portrayal of alienation from ideological forces rather than a psychological problem of integration that presents an opportunity to mitigate the cultural divisiveness inherent in persistent pressures to assimilate.

Jeffrey Breitenfeldt (2008, T): Marsh 101@10:00 AM

Title: "For My Honor's Sake I Fight?": Aristotle's Relative Mean and the Fate of Achilles
Major(s): Philosophy
Advisor(s): Boersema


Abstract: Following archaic Greek ethical norms in The Iliad, in particular opting for extremes with regards to the pursuit of honor and anger, results in clear negative consequences for the fate of Achilles. Nearly four hundred years later, Aristotle’s Nicomachean Ethics contrasts this view by proposing moderation as the method to virtue. By presenting a number of examples from the Iliad and framing them through the Aristotelian relative mean, we can reevaluate the fate of Achilles in order to determine the potential effectiveness of virtue ethics as a moral doctrine. In light of this analysis, a case can be made for the validity of Aristotelian virtue ethics in elucidating the proper approach to honor and anger in current ethical debates involving conduct in war, such as the recent Haditha incident in Iraq.

Sara Brells (2011, T): Marsh 206@3:30 PM

Title: Pluri-nationalism in Ecuador: CONAIE's Quest for Indigenous Rights
Major(s): Politics and Government
Advisor(s): Boykoff
Abstract: This thesis explores how modern land rights issues related to natural resource exploitation in Ecuador spurred the unification of formerly disparate indigenous peoples. Through the application of social movement theory, it explains how the resulting Confederación de Nacionalidades Indígenas del Ecuador (CONAIE) achieved unprecedented success in indigenous citizenship claims and the establishment of an intercultural, bilingual education system model (MOSEIB). Finally, through analysis of the implementation of this model, it examines how indigenous Ecuadoreans balance citizenship and the self-autonomy necessary to preserve their native identity.

Kevin Brennan (2012, T): Price 214@9:00 AM

Title: Isolating and Characterizing the Inhibited Form of Cytochrome P450 2A6
Major(s): Chemistry
Advisor(s): Chan
Abstract: As part of a large family of enzymes that catalyze monooxidation of endogenous and exogenous compounds in the human body, Cytochrome P450 2A6 (CYP2A6) is the major enzyme responsible for the metabolism of nicotine in the human body. Previous work showed that trans-cinnamyl aldehyde is a potent inhibitor of CYP2A6 and is presumed to be a mechanism-based inhibitor. In order to characterize the interaction between CYP2A6 and trans-cinnamyl aldehyde, CYP2A6 protein was expressed in Escherichia coli using a plasmid containing the human cDNA for CYP2A6. After expression and cell lysis, CYP2A6 was purified using Ni-NTA agarose and CM-sepharose column chromatography. Successful purification was confirmed with SDS-PAGE and Western Blot analysis. In the first step of characterizing the inhibition of CYP2A6 by trans-cinnamyl aldehyde, classification of the ligand type was determined using visible absorption spectroscopy.

Benjamin Brewer (2013, T): Berglund 200@3:00 PM

Title: Unsaying Non-Knowledge: Bataille and the Mysticism of Writing
Major(s): Philosophy
Advisor(s): Loevy
Abstract: This paper explores the function of style and writing in the philosophy of Georges Bataille. Bataille's writing is often misunderstood as unnecessarily bizarre. I show, however, that this writing style is a necessary part of his philosophical project. Instead of simply describing his thought, Bataille's writing is meant to create an experience in the reader. The reader should think with Bataille. I construct this analysis through a close reading of Bataille's major texts along with an investigation of his relationship to Heidegger, Kant, and Hegel.

Kyle Brickman (2008, T): Strain 121@1:30 PM

Title: 1866: The Trail?s End
Major(s): Computer Science
Advisor(s): Khoja


Abstract: In the late 80s, the game SimCity was released and, for the first time, players could create their own living, breathing, virtual cities. Now, two decades later, this project aims to recreate that gaming experience for an entirely new platform. 1866: The Trail’s End is a game created for the popular Nintendo DS handheld gaming system. While it intends to capture the gameplay of SimCity, it does so with a twist – the game is set in the Old West and immerses the player in all its sights, sounds, and action. Along with a demonstration of the game and the history of the project, the techniques and difficulties of programming for hardware with limited capability will also be presented.

Therone Bridges (2014, T): Berglund 200@10:30 AM

Title: An Inside Look at Property Management & Accounting
Major(s): Business
Advisor(s): Cowing
Abstract: My senior project is focused on my internship for a property management firm called CoHo Services, primarily with the accounting department. My project will address the various types of work I performed. The experience offered a fantastic look at the many aspects of running a business from dealing with competition and customers, to thinking about expansion within the company's budget. Through experiencing various roles within the company, I now have a good understanding of the way they handle business including the processing of the invoices, the billing of different properties, and balancing the books.

Dane Brist (2011, T): Taylor Auditorium: Marsh 216@3:30 PM

Title: Originate: The Importance of Creativity
Major(s): Media Arts: Integrated Media
Advisor(s): Geraci
Abstract: I created an installation art experience that utilizes many of the skills I have acquired as an Integrated Media major at Pacific University. The project incorporates still photography, cinematography, calligraphy, computer graphic design, 3D projection mapping, and sound design to create an engaging experience that communicates one central idea: the importance of creativity. The experience is constructed of physical objects and projection surfaces in an immersive space onto which video, graphics, and animations are projected. All of this combined with music and sound design will form a cohesive and enveloping experience for the viewer. I will discuss the motivation behind this project along with the methodology that went into its creation.

Nikki Brittain (2008, T): Library Conference@8:30 AM

Title: Sub-cultural Cannibalism
Major(s): Art
Advisor(s): Cheyne


Abstract: My personal multicultural ethnicity and perceived oneness encourages my investigation of identity formation when intersected with culture. The backgrounds that come together to form one person’s identity are so layered and diverse that one ethnicity may be absorbed by the more dominantly accepted side. This can be reflected as a feeling of being trapped in two worlds, having multiple identities, or even a frozen one. Through this research, the two paths of mixed media and digital art have appealed to me for the fact that I enjoy the challenge of composing the layers of a piece visually, as well as the task of working each of the mediums together. Through items such as acrylics, charcoal, colored pencils, and certain printmaking processes, I create works of art that give viewers the chance to ask questions and to explore their perceptions of things in an unexpected way.

Katheryn Brooks (2009, T): Marsh 206@1:30 PM

Title: Patchakuti: Neoliberal Privatization and Social Resistance in Bolivia
Major(s): Politics and Government
Advisor(s): Boykoff
Seward
Moore
Abstract: This thesis explores the role that neoliberalism and the Bretton Woods institutions played in the privatization of water in Cochabamba, Bolivia. It explains how privatization was implemented and the results this had on the distribution of water and the Bolivian people. Finally, it identifies what social and political conditions in Bolivia allowed for the formation of a successful movement against privatization.

Nicolle Brossard (2009, T): Marsh 101@8:30 AM

Title: Stress Induction and Self-Control Modulation, An Energy Budget Model
Major(s): Psychology
Advisor(s): Island
Abstract: Among thirteen western countries, the U.S. life expectancy is second to lowest, ranked at 12 with obesity a direct or indirect cause of this decline (Starfield, 2000). The work ethic, as a culture contributes to the persistent psychological stressors that have led to a maladaptive, physiological means of combating stress. This includes self-soothing behavior through emotional eating, a result of decreased self-control modulation, evidenced in part by the prevalence of obesity among the U.S. adult population, increasing approximately 50 percent per decade since the 1980s (Starfield, 2000). Over time, prolonged exposure to stress erodes our attentional ability, stress both in the short-term and the long-term interfere with our executive function. We become less competent at solving cognitive tasks, at making rational decision, and more likely to make impulsive mistakes (Masicampo & Baumeister, 2008). These factors contribute to a decrease in ability for self-regulation. This study examined the effect of stress induction on immediate eating behavior. Participants were randomly assigned to three levels of induced stress: high (Paced Auditory Serial Addition Test), moderate (timed math problems), and low (untimed math problems) anxiety. A pre-measure of blood glucose level was covaried with the dependent variable to ascertain energy surplus or deficit. Participants were provided access to M&M’s® during the anxiety induction manipulation. A daily energy budget model was used as the overarching theory to explain the anxious consummatory behavior. It was predicted that 1) participants in the higher anxiety conditions would evidence less self-regulation than the moderate and low anxiety conditions; 2) There would be a significantly larger proportion of individuals in the high anxiety condition exhibiting consummatory behavior; and 3) individuals with higher pre-trial blood glucose levels would exert greater self-control than those in the lower blood glucose conditions.

Elyse Brouhard (2011, T): CLIC@11:00 AM

Title: Contradiction in Terms: Nation States, Individual Rights and Refugee Policy in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights
Major(s): History
International Studies
Advisor(s): Jobs
Mahar
Abstract: This thesis examines the refugee rights guaranteed within the United Nation's 1948 Universal Declaration of Human Rights. The Universal Declaration of Human Rights, as one of the first international instruments to recognize certain rights as universal to all people, is regarded as a landmark of progress within the realm of human rights. However, the contradiction inherent to the document is largely overlooked. The concept of a group of nation states ensuring rights to individuals-rights which it is often not in their best interest to ensure, and which they have no real impetus to compel them to abide by-is inherently contradictory. This paper explores these contradictions, and their consequences, specifically relating to the refugee rights within the Declaration.

Elizabeth Brouillette (2012, T): Taylor Auditorium: Marsh 216@4:30 PM

Title: The Final Cut
Major(s): Media Arts: Film and Video Production
Advisor(s): Hardacker
Vaisburd
Abstract: The Final Cut focuses around the main character Mark Bryson who receives, in the same day, a National Journalism Award and a threatening letter from the Box Cutter serial killer who is running rampant in the Northwest. Mark has to find out the identity of the letter sender without letting his dark past take control of the situation. The film is a psychological thriller short narrative film. Senior Film/Video student, Beth Brouillette has combined her cumulative teachings at Pacific to create a film that explores the mental state of the main character, while also working on the technique of suspense that filmmakers such as Alfred Hitchcock made famous through various films. In her presentation she will discuss her short film from preproduction to postproduction, show a short clip from the film and discuss how her past, present, and future as a filmmaker has helped shape The Final Cut into the film it has become.

Ana Brouwer (2007, T): Marsh 201@9:00 AM

Title: An Ethnographic View of Mexican Immigrant Family Dynamics
Major(s): International Studies
Advisor(s): Mahar


Abstract: My research investigates changes in family structure and relationships in Mexican-American immigrant families that occur as a result of their adaptation to a new culture and environment. The focus of this work is on the impact that second language acquisition (English) has on family dynamics. The central research question addressed is how the drastic change in linguistic and cultural circumstances causes rifts between the younger and older generations and whether these circumstances change traditional patterns of behavior and structure in immigrant families. This research is carried out using the following methods: structured interviews with immigrant mothers from the local Mexican immigrant community and participant observation in a program that serves this population.

Jessica Brown (2007, T): Taylor Auditorium: Marsh 216@1:00 PM

Title: Nonverbal Cues of Liking and Rejection during Speed Dating
Major(s): Psychology
Advisor(s): Island


Abstract: The goal of this study was to investigate nonverbal behavioral cues of liking and rejection in a speed-dating context. The behavioral coding was modeled and modified from Moore (1985, 1998), in which male and female subjects were observed in singles' bars. The current study employed a controlled field-study context, as speed dating facilitates verification of observed, nonverbal cues using dating cards. Nonverbal cues were coded by four trained observers for rejection and liking signaling. Subjects were also assessed on a Likert-like scale of 1 to 5 for grooming (operationalized) and attractiveness (subjective), and coded behaviors by observers were correlated with actual date choice. It was anticipated that nonverbal cues of liking would be predictive of date choice and nonverbal rejection cues would be linked to lack of choice.

Melissa Brown (2008, T): Price 214@10:30 AM

Title: The Effect of Hamstring Strengthening on EMG Activity
Major(s): Exercise Science
Advisor(s): Schot


Abstract: The anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) plays a major role in knee stability, and a rupture of the ACL can be an extremely devastating injury, leading to surgery and months of rehabilitation. Many believe that the hamstrings play an important role in the protection of the ACL; a component of the hamstrings pull against the motion that is restricted by the ACL, thus resulting in a protective effect acting on the ligament. It is also believed that the added compression of the knee elicited by the hamstrings further stabilizes the knee. However, during landings many individuals rely heavily on the quadriceps, which can eliminate the protective effects that the hamstrings induce. Strengthening the hamstrings is the focus of many rehabilitation and prevention programs; however, merely strengthening a muscle does not guarantee that it will be relied upon more. Simultaneous activation of both the hamstrings and the quadriceps is necessary for the protection of the ACL during landings. To further investigate the role of the hamstrings in knee protection, the effects of a hamstring strengthening program and whether it elicits safer muscle activation patterns during a landing task were explored. 17 college-age females participated in a 14-session hamstring strengthening program consisting of three exercises: straight leg dead lift, supine hip extension and prone knee flexion. Electromyography (EMG) was used to examine muscle activation patterns and the duration of these firings prior to the start of training and after the strengthening program had been completed. A period of 120 ms pre-landing and 120 post-landing was analyzed using the root-mean-squared technique. For the hamstrings, the biceps femoris and semitendinosus were observed and the rectus femoris and vastus lateralis were monitored for the quadriceps. There were no differences in the pre-contact phase for any of the muscles during both the pre-test and the post-test. The rectus femoris, vastus lateralis and biceps femoris all increased from the pre-contact phase to the post-contact training in both the pre- and post-tests, but with a larger increase in the post-test. The mean increases from pre- to post- during the post-contact phase were 833.77 mV, 542.68 mV and 445.82 mV, respectively. There were no differences pre- or post- in either phase for the semitendinosus due to large variability in the EMG results. The resulting increases in hamstring activation during the landing phase during the post-test were interpreted as indicating that strengthening the hamstrings will elicit safer muscle activation patterns during landing tasks.

Jessica Brown (2010, T): Price 204@11:30 AM

Title: Poly(ADP-Ribose) Polymerase Inhibitor: an Anticancer Drug for Hereditary Breast Cancer
Major(s): Biology
Advisor(s): Halpern
Abstract: Hereditary breast cancer is a potentially fatal disease that develops in a high percentage of women who have a defective BRCA gene. Mutations in the tumor suppressor genes BRCAI and BRCAII are closely associated with many different types of cancer. Current cancer management methods (chemotherapy and radiation) are deleterious to both healthy and cancerous cells, eliciting many unpleasant side effects. In this capstone, I investigate an innovative new anticancer drug, PARP inhibitors, that may provide better treatment options for cancer patients. PARP inhibition targets cancer cells exclusively by exploiting the faulty BRCA gene. In preventing poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase from repairing single stranded DNA damage, an accumulation of double stranded breaks ensues. Healthy cells fix the damage by way of homologous recombination and are not adversely affected. Tumor cells contain the defective BRCA gene and cannot repair the breaks. Subsequently, the rate of tumor cell growth is slowed, halted, or even reversed. Currently in clinical-trials, PARP inhibitors are leading the way in designing a more advanced, humane, and individualized form of cancer treatment.

Raven Brown (2010, T): Price 214@9:00 AM

Title: Allantois and Yolk Sac: Development, Function, and Possible Evolutionary Origins of Viviparous Mammalian Placental Tissues
Major(s): Biology
Advisor(s): Rynd
Abstract: The development and function of both the allantois and yolk sac will be examined in the chicken embryo and compared to the development and function of the equivalent mammalian tissues. The possibility of an evolutionary connection between birds and mammals (including humans), with respect to the development and functions of these two tissues, will be explored. The incorporation of the allantois and yolk sac into the developing human placenta and umbilical cord will be discussed, as well as the overall functions of the mammalian placenta.

Shannon Brown (2012, T): Marsh 206@9:30 AM

Title: High on Hemp:Cannabis sativa L. in the Mainstream Media
Major(s): Politics and Government
Advisor(s): Van Dyk
Boykoff
Abstract: Industrial hemp, or Cannabis sativa L. is an annual herb with abundant uses. Cultivation in most industrialized countries, including the United States, however, halted in the 20th century when hemp became linked with marijuana, the species' other phenotype, which has psychoactive properties. Recently Canada legalized industrial hemp, but the United States has not. This thesis compares media coverage of industrial hemp in the United States and Canada to consider whether coverage differs considerably in the two countries. I hypothesize that coverage of hemp is more negative in the United States, thus supporting the federal ban on hemp. Collecting data from eight newspapers over a twenty year time period, this thesis analyzed the media perspective (framing) and the sources of those perspectives (indexing) in approximately 510 articles. Through this research four dominant frames were identified: the Eco-Commodity Frame, the Counterculture Frame, the Agricultural Resource Frame, and the Marijuana Frame. While there was a large discrepancy in how often hemp was reported on between the two countries, there was little, if any, difference on the frames used. This research points to no definite indication that the frames employed by the mainstream media contributed to the legal status of industrial hemp in the United States, however, it leads us to question, what is?

Hayley Brown (2012, P): Price 1st Floor Hallway@10:00 AM

Title: The consequences of speech production on lactate threshold
Major(s): Exercise Science
Advisor(s): Henry
Abstract: Background: It has been proposed that the human respiratory system experiences an interesting phenomenon when the physiological necessity to breathe and the behavioral desire to produce speech occur simultaneously. This competition may be especially significant during situations when the physiological demand for ventilation and corresponding gaseous exchange is increased by physical activity. Furthermore, increasing intensity of physical activity is associated with an eventual dissociation of glycolysis from mitochondrial respiration, leading to a net accumulation of lactic acid. The exercise intensity associated with the net lactate accumulation - termed lactate threshold - is the maximal level of exercise intensity that can be sustained indefinitely. Therefore, lactate threshold is a very important concept in human movement studies. Lactate threshold is modifiable and is dependent upon [mitochondrial enzyme], endurance training, O2 availability, etc. Theoretically, ventilation and gaseous exchange at the pulmonary level can potentially alter the lactate threshold. Although talking while exercising is known to alter ventilation parameters, few studies have investigated the effect of talking on [blood lactate] or arterial oxygen saturation. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of speech production during submaximal exercise on [blood lactate], lactate threshold, and arterial blood oxygen saturation. Methods: Subjects (N=14) performed two counterbalanced graded cycle ergometer VO2 max tests to exhaustion under the conditions of talking or not talking. A 20W ramp protocol was utilized for all sessions. During both sessions, blood was obtained via finger-prick every two minutes and [blood lactate] analyzed in duplicate via biomedical lactate meters. Duplicate lactate measurements at each time point were required to be within 0.5 mmol or additional measurements were conducted. Data was evaluated utilizing two-tailed T-tests, and accepted onset of blood lactate accumulation (OBLA) of 4 mmol was the method utilized to represent lactate threshold. Results: Talking during exercise did not alter the lactate threshold as represented by OBLA. Additionally, at any given submaximal exercise intensity, arterial oxygen saturation was not affected by talking while exercising. Conclusions: With regard to lactate threshold and arterial blood oxygen saturation, talking during physical activity is neither beneficial nor harmful.

Nicole Brown (2012, P): Strain Hall 2nd Floor@1:00 PM

Title: Effects of Ocean Acidification on Growth and Calcification of Echinoderm Larvae
Major(s): Biology
Advisor(s): Scholnick
Abstract: Human impacts on the environment, such as the burning of fossil fuels, have increased the levels of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. The anthropogenic CO2 diffuses into the ocean and CO2 partial pressure increases. This then raises the concentration of hydrogen ions, thereby reducing the oceans pH levels in a process termed, ocean acidification (OA). Calcifying organisms, such as echinoderms, are directly affected by ocean acidification which involves a decrease of the calcium carbonate (CaCO3) saturation state which is used during calcification. For my capstone research analysis, I examined the effects of ocean acidification on the growth and calcification of echinoderm larvae. Results from previous studies show that when exposed to higher CO2 levels and lower pH levels, there are negative consequences on echinoderm growth and development, which includes fertilization, cleavage, settlement, larvae and reproduction. There is also evidence of higher mortality rates and stunted growth of larvae in lower pH conditions. This is because the larvae stage is vulnerable to environmental changes since the larvae cannot protect themselves and are still developing. If the echinoderm larvae are unable to survive past the developmental stage, or they are unable to calcify, then they cannot protect themselves from predators and will eventually die off. These results are significant because impacts of ocean acidification on fertilization and reproduction of calcifiers such as echinoderms can directly negatively affect population survival rates and reproduction rates, and in turn affect entire marine ecosystems.

Kathleen Brown (2013, T): CLIC@9:30 AM

Title: The Evolution of the French "r"
Major(s): World Languages: French
Advisor(s): de Larquier
Abstract: In modern French, the pronunciation of the letter "r" differs from that of the other Romance languages, in which the sound is produced when the tip of the tongue makes contact with the superior alveolar ridge. The French "r" was originally pronounced in the same way but over time speakers have found alternative means of emitting the sound, and it is now voiced with a fluttering of the uvula. This study was conducted in order to uncover the influences, historical and social, that have caused the incremental evolution in the pronunciation of the French "r" from the Latin-derived alveolar trill to the more guttural "r" of today.

Kelsey Brown (2014, T): McGill Auditorium@8:00 AM

Title: Implementation of Telemetry for More Efficient Location of the American Kestrel (Falco sparverius)
Major(s): Environmental Studies
Advisor(s): Van Buskirk
Abstract: The American Kestrel, one of North America's native raptor species, is exhibiting variable population trends across the country. In some areas populations are doing quite well while in other regions they are in decline. The area around Forest Grove, Oregon seems to provide high-quality habitat area for this species, and because of that it is an excellent site for investigating its relationship to the surrounding ecosystem. One way to follow individual kestrels is by outfitting them with USGS and VID bands. These bands help us to visually relocate birds have been previously caught in order to keep track of their location and behavior as they move from day to day. While bands are very helpful, our research turned to radio telemetry in the summer of 2014 to increase our ability to track and locate kestrels. Implementing telemetry required several attempts to find a suitable attachment method, but led to the adoption of a simple to use leg loop harness. We were able to collect much more data from birds outfitted with radios than from those outfitted with bands because we were able to locate the birds by their signal and follow it until we found our subject. Radio telemetry has proven a great asset to our research and will likely be used in future years.

Gavin Brown (2014, T): Taylor Auditorium: Marsh 216@2:00 PM

Title: Coffee and a Bagel
Major(s): Media Arts: Film and Video Production
Advisor(s): Hardacker
Vaisburd
Abstract: Coffee and a Bagel is a short animated film about an elderly, recently widowed man named Gilbert who must venture out to seek a friend. Gavin was inspired to write this story from observing other people's online interaction in an Internet café in France while he was studying abroad. This 3D computer animation film encapsulates Gavin's education while at Pacific University and demonstrates the conventions of good storytelling, technical knowledge of creating scenes, and organizing talent and resources. This film marks Gavin first major project in animation, and is the direction he wishes to pursue for a future career.

Sierra Brummett (2012, T): Library Conference@1:00 PM

Title: Consensual Social Deviance: A Deontological Approach to Absolving Individuals who Deviate from Accepted Social Mores
Major(s): Philosophy
Advisor(s): Ilea
Abstract: I argue that consent is a sufficient (though not necessary) condition to qualify any moral act as morally acceptable. In any case where there is a capacity for consent and that capacity is fulfilled by all involved parties, an act can never be immoral. This applies even to acts that deviate from standard social mores. In my thesis, I examine three extreme deviances: consensual cannibalism, adult incest, and simulated child pornography. I argue that with the recognition of consent as a sufficient condition for moral acceptability, these extreme deviances become moral. I also discuss how the three main ethical theories fail to absolve extreme social deviants. Kantian ethics, Utilitarianism and Virtue Ethics each fail to adequately consider the role consent plays in the moral theatre and underestimate its importance. The questions Kantian Ethics, Utilitarianism and Virtue ethics ask are secondary questions and should be asked only after the presence or absence of consent is considered, if at all.

Taylor Brummett (2013, T): Berglund 230@3:00 PM

Title: Veterans' Courts: An Experiment in Therapeutic Jurisprudence for U.S. Combat Veterans
Major(s): Social Work
Advisor(s): Ritter
Abstract: Returning veterans face significant obstacles when returning home from war. The damage inflicted by combat duty can leave a veteran scarred and suffering from mental health challenges such as PTSD, Traumatic Brain Injury, substance abuse, and depression-among others. Officials in the criminal justice system have noticed an increase in veteran arrests since the onset of the U.S. War on Terror. In 2011, in San Francisco County, CA alone, the county jail booked in an average of 97 veterans a day. Responding to this rising problem, a growing number of counties in the U.S. have begun developing Veterans' Treatment Courts as a diversion program for veterans who have committed their first criminal offense. These programs are designed to hold veterans responsible for their criminal actions while providing specialized services that acknowledge their service and the challenges they face as returning veterans. This Senior Capstone project examines the history, model, and evaluation of Veterans' Treatment Courts and proposes the establishment of one in Washington County, Oregon.

Hayley Brusewitz (2013, T): CLIC@1:00 PM

Title: Visca Catalunya: Understanding the languages of resistance in Catalan society today.
Major(s): World Languages: Spanish
Applied Theater
Advisor(s): Christoph
Abstract: Catalonia, the Northeastern region of Spain, desires to become an independent state in Europe. A vote for independence, scheduled for 2016, is coincidentally the 300-year anniversary of Catalonia's absorption into the Spanish national identity. This study focuses on the distinct linguistic and cultural expressions of Catalonia, and how they are linked to the politics and economics of the region. In addition to examining the Catalan language, I will be analyzing their regional dance, human tower formations and the cultural significance of the Barcelona soccer team. This study argues that these cultural expressions are examples of regional resistance and as such, are key to understanding the separatist identity found in Catalan society today.

Hayley Brusewitz (2013, T): Marsh 101@8:30 AM

Title: Disparity in the Ranks: An Analysis of the Autonomous Regions in Spain
Major(s): Politics and Government
Advisor(s): Van Dyk
Abstract: The formation of the European Union has created an atmosphere favorable to smaller states. Most recently, areas such as Scotland, Flanders, and Catalonia have all shown interest in becoming independent. This paper focuses on Spain, the home of Catalonia. Spain has been a democracy since the late 20th century, and since that time has held the informal policy of allowing individual regions additional authority over its citizens. This paper develops a method for analyzing the degree and different forms of regional autonomy by comparing the different regions of Spain in eight different categories: the tax system, budget policy, healthcare initiative, security, and influence in central government, culture, and language. I then use these categories to rank each region. I conclude that the level of autonomy varies enormously among regions for two reasons: because of the long lasting historical roots established by certain regions, and the strong economic interests of Spain.

Lauren Bruss (2012, T): CLIC@9:30 AM

Title: Fritz Lang: His Influence through Expressionist Film and Film Noir
Major(s): World Languages: German
Humanities, Coordinated Studies
Advisor(s): French
Hardacker
Abstract: This presentation examines select films by the German director Fritz Lang and his techniques of bringing together cinematic Expressionism and Film Noir. First, the analysis will define and then compare and contrast Expressionism and Film Noir. Second, the project investigates how Fritz Lang, who began his career in Germany's Expressionist Cinema, greatly influenced the development of Film Noir when he actively chose not to involve himself in the Nazi party and instead to emigrate to the United States. Fritz Lang's personal history, specifically his career in Post-WWI Germany with Expressionist cinema, gives insight into his transition between German and American cultures and filmmaking. Besides analyzing Lang's American accomplishments and personal contributions to cinematic art forms, the presentation examines specific contributions of other cinematographers as well as artists outside of cinema in both Europe and America. The main body of the thesis expounds upon Lang's trademark cinematic elements in his Expressionist and Film Noir films Metropolis, M, Das Testament des Dr Mabuse, The Big Heat, Scarlet Street, and Beyond a Reasonable Doubt. Specifically the films Metropolis and The Big Heat serve as prime examples of each genre and provide evidence of Fritz Lang's wide-sweeping influence on Film Noir.

Meredith Brynteson (2008, T): Library Classroom@2:00 PM

Title: The Bermuda Conference: The Use of Refugees for Public Relations
Major(s): History
Advisor(s): Jobs


Abstract: Held in 1943, the Bermuda Conference was seen by many as a valid and wholehearted attempt by the United States and the United Kingdom to come together in order to develop a comprehensive plan aimed at helping the millions of Jews in Europe escape from Nazi terror. In reality this conference was the result of years of public opinion battles in both nation-states over what should be done to help the Jews that were being persecuted. This careful public relations situation was seen in all aspects of the conference including the aftermath. Instead of the Bermuda Conference actively saving millions from death, it simply gave the illusion that the United States and the United Kingdom were doing something. Although this conference has had little written about it, it is able to shed light on how the governments of those two nations felt about European Jews in danger, how government policy could really help and ultimately the effect that public opinion has on any one government during peacetime or wartime.

Jennifer Buck (2013, T): Berglund 230@1:00 PM

Title: Perceived stigma and societal discrimination in individuals with mental illness: Understanding the importance of a sense of community
Major(s): Social Work
Advisor(s): Schweitzer
Abstract: In any given year, one in four adults experience a diagnosable mental health disorder. Research indicates that these individuals are more likely to struggle with unemployment, lower income, diminished self-image, lower self-esteem, and have fewer social supports. According to modified labeling theory, this creates a nearly unavoidable fate of social isolation as these individuals are more likely to withdraw, thus diminishing their sense of community, overall well-being, and quality of life. However, research suggests that a sense of community can help reduce isolation, protect from psychiatric relapses, and increase self-esteem. Additionally, reducing internalized stigma may help to minimize the overall negative impacts associated with mental illness. Consequently, a qualitative study was conducted examining the effects of perceived stigma and societal discrimination on those with a mental illness and how social supports and a sense of community belonging moderate those effects. This capstone presentation will report findings, limitations, and future considerations for research about the stigma surrounding mental health.

Jacob Buffy (2009, T): Marsh 206@8:30 AM

Title: Neoliberalism: Third World Wonder or Third World Blunder? Deciphering Neoliberalism and Alternatives in Venezuela
Major(s): International Studies
Advisor(s): Boykoff
Abstract: Neoliberalism has been hailed by many as the panacea for political and economic freedom and alleviating global poverty. However, heavy criticisms and the recent economic malaise have challenged this economic ideology as fallacious and detrimental, particularly in regard to the developing world. This thesis investigates the background of neoliberalism while exploring what alternatives exist to unfettered capitalism. Analyzing the case of Venezuela’s implementation of new-socialist programes provides an illuminating view into alternatives already at work, while providing a potential framework applicable to developing countries. 

Tung Bui (2014, T): Berglund 230@2:30 PM

Title: Summer internship experience at Deloitte Vietnam
Major(s): Business
Advisor(s): Ramaya
Abstract: During summer of 2013 I interned at Deloitte Vietnam - a member of Deloitte Touche Tomatsu. My internship provided me an opportunity to work closely with an assigned mentor overseeing the review and analysis of financial statements and auditing reports of different firms across industries. These firms were in the process of shifting from the Vietnamese Accounting System(VAS) towards new reporting protocols as required by the International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS). The internship proved to be a highly valuable experience and has provided me with a foundational understanding of a professional working environment with all of its inherent challenges as Vietnam adapts to a globally integrated economy.

Rachael Burbank (2009, T): Library Conference@2:30 PM

Title: "Don't waste your life waiting?"
Major(s): English: Creative Writing
Advisor(s): Pagan
Abstract: This is a creative thesis containing a collection of essays – containing fiction and non-fiction – that explores situations where people are forced to wait in a society that doesn’t teach them how to successfully wait. Like Lawrence Ferlinghetti’s poem “I am Waiting,” the collection of essays discover waiting for a rebirth of wonder. Although not everything in the collection is as philosophical as Ferlinghetti who is waiting for the Last Supper to be served, but there is a balance between these tough topics and simple ones like waiting for nail polish to dry. Whether sitting at a traffic light, at a drive-through Starbucks, or doctor’s office, people grow uncomfortable with waiting. These essays explore some of the aftermaths, some of the internal dialogues, and some of the advantages of waiting in today’s fast-paced consumer-driven society.

Angela Burcar (2007, T): Taylor Auditorium: Marsh 216@9:00 AM

Title: Jigsaw Classroom: 30 Years Later and Still Necessary
Major(s): Psychology
Advisor(s): Burns-Glover


Abstract: Recent changes in the demography of school enrollments in Forest Grove, Oregon, have affected the inter-group behaviors in local classrooms (Hannah-Jones, 2006). Local school counselors have indicated that there is a need to promote better interethnic relations within the elementary school classroom. Previous research (Aronson, 1978) has indicated that a cooperative learning model known as the "Jigsaw Classroom' can improve both the positive social climate (Aronson, 1977) and the learning achieved by students of diverse backgrounds. The study I propose is to apply the organizational principles and outcome measures outlined by Aronson (http://www.jigsaw.org/, 2006) to a multiethnic, multilingual classroom of fifth graders attending school in Forest Grove

Nicole Burgess (2012, T): Marsh 106@3:00 PM

Title: Facilitating Perspective Taking in School-Aged Children:One step towards a better tomorrow
Major(s): Psychology
Advisor(s): Kleinknecht
Abstract: The ability to set aside your egocentrism and take the perspective of others develops gradually throughout childhood. Many factors influence the course of development, ranging from neurological and linguistic advances to social experiences, good familial relationships, and school environments. Along those lines, in this project we worked closely with the Forest Grove Community School Principal to create a set of curricular materials designed to promote the advancement of students' perspective abilities. Materials were designed in a progressively challenging, age appropriate manner, and include reference information, at-a-glance lists of what skills challenge children's perspective abilities at each level, a series of activities and scenarios that, by engaging in should promote children's perspective taking advancement, and hand-outs for parents. Our program should also encourage students to be good citizens and stewards for their school and greater community. It is imperative that children are appropriately challenged so that their perspective taking abilities flourish.

Benjamin Busch (2009, T): Strain 121@9:00 AM

Title: Investigation of Burned Areas in Nevada as a Model for Disturbed Areas and the Diversity-Invasibility Hypothesis
Major(s): Environmental Studies
Advisor(s): Gundersen
Abstract: Today’s global economy and the increased mobility of the human race have led to an accelerated movement of species beyond natural dispersal barriers. These Invasive species are the cause of widespread degradation of natural ecosystems resulting in loss of native species and, as the U.S. Department of Agriculture estimates, a forgone economic yield of $130 million dollars. It is believed that an ecosystem with more native species is more resistant to invasion due to the greater amount niches filled by a greater number of species. This study focuses on ecosystems recovering from fire in the Eastern Nevada region of the Great Basin. These burned areas were reseeded by the Bureau of Land Management using seed mixes of differing species diversity (2-11 species). This study examines the relationship between number of species in the rehabilitation seed mix and the quantity of invasive species in each plot. It is hoped that a better understanding of plant invasions in today’s changing world is reached so that native ecosystems will persist and the important connections between humans and the place they live will sustain and grow so they may both prosper in the future.

Brittany Busch (2013, T): Price 204@2:30 PM

Title: The Effects of Bandwidth Practice Scheduling on the Learning of Three Novel Golf Putts
Major(s): Exercise Science
Advisor(s): Jackson
Abstract: When learning motor skills, the schedule in which they are practiced can make a difference in how well they are acquired and retained. Creating effective environments that promote learning during practice that will enhance performance on later retention and transfer tests is the ideal goal for most practitioners. One factor that has been found to affect the effectiveness of the learning environment is the schedule in which multiple skills are practiced. Previous research has found that randomizing the order/schedule in which skills are performed (an increase in contextual interference) results in improved retention and transfer. However, this randomization does not take into account individual differences, and whether the learner is proficient enough to benefit from the switch. Purpose: The purpose of the proposed study is to determine whether a bandwidth practice schedule can facilitate learning as well or better than the previously-effective random and progressive schedules. Methods: Pacific University community members, between the ages 18-25, were recruited and were asked to learn and perform three golf-putting tasks composed of unique distances and challenges. Participants practiced these tasks in one of three conditions, composed of different practice schedules: random, progressive, & performance bandwidth (changing from task to task only when they achieve a specific level of success). The study spanned across two testing days, including a 24-hour retention period. Results & Conclusions: Results will be presented as to the effects of a bandwidth practice schedule (in comparison to the research standard) on learning a series of novice golf putting tasks.

Olivia Buscho (2012, T): Marsh 106@11:30 AM

Title: THE DARKENING: Struggling With Sight Loss and Maintaining Autonomy
Major(s): Psychology
Advisor(s): Island
Abstract: The purpose of this empirical review is to investigate the consequences of sight loss and which factors may help prevent psychosocial problems and encourage autonomy. The literature indicates many issues associated with sight loss such as depression, social isolation, and financial struggle. This review will also explore how the deaf-blind community, specifically those with Usher syndrome, matches this research, and how it differs. This review will further examine why a population with two sensory modality losses might have more success than those with just one loss, and what this indicates about the nature of sight loss. The visually impaired are marginalized in obvious ways, but are also overlooked so subtly that their maltreatment often goes undetected. The literature discusses the natural consequences of sight loss, but also suggests further problems that may lie in the social structure of blindness, rather than direct effects of a sensory loss. This paper will evaluate the psychosocial issues that emerge as a result of sight loss and the extent to which they can be moderated through social policy, social support, and healthcare reform.

Sarah Bustamante (2011, T): Berglund 232@8:30 AM

Title: Building Confidence: A Self Study Through Writing Conferences
Major(s): Education
Advisor(s): Phillips
Abstract: How can I learn to facilitate effective writing conferences that encourage student-writing abilities and writing identities through a focus on my teacher talk, my ability to listen and make decisions about what a student needs, and my use of conference time? This is the question guiding the self-study research completed by teacher-researchers from the College of Education. Teacher-researchers spent six weeks conducting writing conferences with children grades K-8. We audio-recorded each session to analyze our own talk as teachers and our use of writing conference time. Each teacher-researcher transcribed and analyzed one audio recording each week. Teacher-researchers wrote field notes, collected related artifacts, and wrote two analytic memos during the research process. Our research group found the following common themes as we analyzed each other's and our own transcripts, journals, and field notes: 1) the influence of teacher's confidence on the writing conferences; 2) the importance of specific questions and compliments that propel the writer forward and build a writer's identity.

Amanda Butkovich (2012, T): Berglund 200@9:30 AM

Title: Transgressive Fiction: An Exploration of Genre and Style In Relation To Fight Club
Major(s): English: Creative Writing
Advisor(s): Johnson
Abstract: Transgressive fiction as a genre is relatively new in the literary world, though many of its aspects can be found in the works of authors throughout the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. These aspects include the rendering of human flesh, the protagonist confined by his society, the taboo, but most of all, the yearning for human contact, for some form of redemption. After reading Chuck Palahniuk's Fight Club, my own writing style began to reflect this genre, such as the antisocial protagonists, dysfunctional families or societies, and the violence. For my presentation, I will explore the aspects of the transgressive genre and style and how they have informed my fictionalized story "Mother's Little Prince."

Sean Butler (2007, T): Marsh LL21@9:00 AM

Title: An Analysis of Pacific University Student Attitudes towards the Military
Major(s): Sociology
Advisor(s): Phillips


Abstract: Using surveys and quantitative analysis, this project examined Pacific University undergraduate students' perceptions of the military and military personnel. It seems that the old idea of the military as a noble calling has fallen by the wayside, to be replaced with the reputation of an option of last resort. My primary interest is in determining if student's perceptions of the military as an institution differ from their perceptions of the individuals serving within it. Second, I explored possible predictor factors of students' attitudes towards the military.

Kevin Butler (2009, T): Marsh 206@11:30 AM

Title: Don't Ask, Don't Tell, Don't Work: Comparing Truman's Integration of the Military with Clinton's Compromise for Gay Integration of the Military
Major(s): Politics and Government
Advisor(s): Boykoff
Abstract: President Harry. S. Truman helped usher in a new age of civil rights with the signing of Executive Order 9981, which desegregated the military. President Bill Clinton would later attempt something similar by trying to fully integrate homosexuals into the military, but due to resistance, could only manage the compromise of “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell.” This thesis will explore what enabled Truman to bring about his changes to the military whilst comparing it to why Clinton could only manage his goals partway.

Stuart Butsch (2010, T): McGill Auditorium@1:30 PM

Title: Oregon Prevailing Wage Laws and their Effect on Employment
Major(s): Economics
Advisor(s): Haag
Abstract: Prevailing wages laws in Oregon require that construction workers be paid a prevailing rate on publicly funded construction projects. The question of whether prevailing wage laws continue to make policy sense is controversial. One of the most significant and often ignored issues in this debate is what impact prevailing wage laws have on unemployment. This analysis uses prevailing wage data from the Oregon Bureau of Labor and Industries and market wage data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics to examine the hypothesis that county unemployment within the construction industry is higher when prevailing wages are set above market wages. The general conclusion of this research is that in choosing to override the market’s determination of wages, Oregon is trading higher construction employment for a higher paid construction labor force.

Jaron Butterfield (2012, T): Price 202@11:00 AM

Title: Identifying the Chemical Fingerprint of a Hypoglycemic State in Diabetics: What Helper Dogs Detect
Major(s): Exercise Science
Advisor(s): Cordes
Schot
Abstract: Research has shown that dogs are capable of detecting and being trained to detect varying levels of blood sugar in the sweat of diabetic patients. However, exactly what the trained dogs are able to detect has yet to be determined. Purpose: To compare sweat samples from diabetic patients at several blood sugar levels to determine what chemical differences exist that dogs might be detecting. Methods: 5 different sweat samples at blood sugar levels of 58, 64, 85, and 102 milligrams per deciliter were analyzed using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Samples were extracted using an SPME fiber. Several experimental methods for the gas chromatography/mass spectrometry protocols were tested to determine an optimal method. After a preferred method was obtained, that preferred method was used to analyze differences between the two blood sugar sample extremes (58, 102). Another sample of non-diabetic sweat at a higher concentration was also tested to determine if sensitivity could be increased in analysis. Chromatograms were then studied and peaks were compared to library spectra to determine identity of specific chemicals. Results: Analysis is ongoing and results will be delivered at the presentation. Summary: Spectral library databases are limited in terms of the number of different biological chemicals included. However, we were able to identify several distinct peaks reliably and made significant progress in developing the methods needed to analyze these samples.

Erika Cabatingan (2011, P): Strain Hall 2nd Floor@2:00 PM

Title: The Induction of Cytochrome P4501A1 in Polydon spathula and its Relationship to Cancer Rates
Major(s): Biology
Advisor(s): Sardinia
Abstract: Many mammals poses the gene CYP1A1 and CYP1A2 which are similar in genetic sequence and catalytic function to CYP1A, making it an efficient equivalent for gene study among fish and humans. Although the expression of CYP1A is essential in detoxification it is also an activator for hydrocarbon carcinogens. In the process of breaking down toxins like PCBs to be excreted through the urine, carcinogenesis occurs. Water located near highly industrialized areas have become contaminated with highly toxic and lipophilic persistent organic pollutants (POPs) which ruin water quality and pose a threat to both humans and marine life. A variety of fish species, located in extremely polluted waters possess an adaptation that allows them to inhibit induction of CYP1A. How is it that they can inhibit the induction of CYP1A, but still be able to effectively remove toxins from their bodies? I would like to look at mRNA extracted from the liver of the paddlefish and determine if the CYP1A gene is being transcribed just but not being induced. By looking at the specific transcription of this gene I hope to determine how these fish are able turn off the regulation of this gene and still remove toxins from their bodies, especially in environments where CYP1A should be expressed. I hypothesize that CYP1A1 is present in fish species like the paddlefish but they are not being transcribed and an alternative pathway is being used to remove toxins from their bodies.

Rachel Cadd (2012, T): Berglund 230@9:30 AM

Title: "Wives, Submit to Your Husbands": Exploring Christian Church Pastors' Beliefs about Intimate Partner Violence
Major(s): Social Work
Advisor(s): Ritter
Abstract: Intimate Partner Violence (IPV) is a pervasive problem in the United States; in fact one in four women will experience IPV in their lifetime. Christian church pastors are uniquely positioned to help those affected by IPV due to their roles as community leaders, teachers and counselors. When trying to help victims of IPV, these pastors may not know how to help victims or where to draw the line where religious beliefs of marriage end and IPV begins. Some have yet to admit that IPV even exists in their church congregations. This Capstone project details the results of a survey of Christian church pastors. The goals of the survey were to analyze these pastors' beliefs about IPV and assess their openness to starting programs in their church to help people who are, or have been, affected by IPV. The presentation will emphasize the importance of support and services for those affected by IPV and it will report on the evaluation results of the pastor survey.

Kelli Cadelinia (2013, P): Strain Hall 3rd Floor@11:00 AM

Title: The Effectiveness of Contact Lenses Containing Antibiotics on the Microbial Keratitis-Causing Bacterium, Pseudomonas Aeruginosa
Major(s): Biology
Advisor(s): Sardinia
Abstract: Microbial keratitis, inflammation of the cornea, is most commonly caused by an infection associated with microbial contamination of contact lenses. Studies have shown that poor hygienic care of storage cases supplies a suitable environment to enhance the growth of environmental organisms, such as the bacterium, Pseudomonas aeruginosa. P. aeruginosa is a Gram-negative bacterium that has the ability to invade the eye through surface injury of the cornea. Antibiotic eye drops have been the primary treatment to prevent the growth of the bacteria, though there were many disadvantages associated with this method. Researchers have begun testing alternative treatment methods including contact lenses of different materials containing antibiotics, such as vancomycin, gentamicin, and quinolones. Though optimum antibiotic selection depends on multiple factors, contact lenses soaked in antibiotic solution or containing fibrin coatings provide an effective delivery system to the eye for the treatment of bacterial keratitis.

Sherylle Cadiente (2009, T): Price 203@9:00 AM

Title: The Endogenous Opioid System and the Use of Naltrexone for the Treatment of Alcohol Dependency
Major(s): Biology
Advisor(s): Schnorr
Abstract: The National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions (NESARC) reports that 8.5% of the total population of the United States met the criteria for an alcohol use disorder. Consumption of alcohol affects the endogenous opioid system by increasing the release of opiate peptides within regions of the brain that affect pain, feeding, mood, reinforcement, and stress. The relationship between alcohol and the opioid system may therefore suggest a link to the development of alcohol dependence. Naltrexone is one of three medications approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the treatment of alcohol dependence. A review of the nonselective opioid receptor antagonist, Naltrexone, is discussed in terms of its affect for increasing the activity of the endogenous opioid system, the genetic tendency towards alcohol use, and the optimum use of Naltrexone for the treatment of alcohol dependence.

Abby Cain (2013, T): McGill Auditorium@11:00 AM

Title: Identifying Fish Barriers in the Dairy-McKay Watershed
Major(s): Environmental Science
Advisor(s): Van Buskirk
Abstract: Millions of culverts and other water diversions have been placed around the country in order to redirect stream flow under roads. These structures often inhibit the movement of fish up and down streams by increasing the slope of the stream to an impassible level or by blocking the water flow all together. Washington County and the BLM have undertaken a cooperative project to locate and assess culverts to determine how much of an impediment those barriers pose to fish. Working for the Tualatin River Watershed Council this capstone project used ArcGIS mapping technology to identify culvert sites on private land in the Dairy-McKay Watershed. Once identified, our field team surveyed and prioritized nine of these culverts for repair or replacement. Culvert replacement opens stream habitat that may have been previously unavailable to fish. The identification of these barriers is imperative to the conservation of native fish species.

Ron Calkins (2011, T): McGill Auditorium@10:00 AM

Title: University Food Waste COmposting
Major(s): Environmental Studies w/ Sustainable Design Emphasis
Advisor(s): O'Day
Abstract: Over 500 pounds of food waste is discarded every week at the University dining hall. This waste causes odor, attracts pests, and requires transportation to several points before ending up in a landfill. Kitchen scraps, dining room food waste and compostable materials make up more than 65% of Washburne Halls waste stream. A sample of this biomaterial was captured and treated in a two-stage process, producing a high-grade compost. Recapturing some of the energy embodied in our waste stream requires cooperation from several departments. These include Aramark dining services, facilities, and B-street farm. By separating bio-waste and treating it ourselves we decrease our carbon footprint and create a usable product.

Avery Camara (2012, T): Marsh 201@2:30 PM

Title: An Analysis of Slavic Mythology and Folklore within Popular Culture
Major(s): Sociology
Advisor(s): Rafalovich
Abstract: Although popular culture today receives influence from different and varying sources there are many archetypes, tropes and clichs have their sources stem from far back into religious and even mythological inspirations. Popular mythological credit draws back to Egyptian, Greek and Norse mythology but within recent works there is a rise of inspiration from other sources. Among those sources rises Slavic mythology from which a variety of character types and themes have grown in popularity. From the popularizations of the witch, werewolf, and vampire to the use of more elder gods and the beginnings of fairy tales the influence of Slavic mythology has become both apparent and important to modern Pop culture.

Brittney Campbell (2008, T): Marsh 201@8:30 AM

Title: Bilingual Education: Looking At the History to Find Hope for the Future
Major(s): Education
Advisor(s): Faulconer


Abstract: Imagine being a child and attending school in a language you are still learning to speak. Maybe you are in a school that permits Bilingual Education and maybe you are not. My senior research project regarding the history behind Bilingual Education examines some of the key milestones in history such as the Civil Rights Movement, the War on Poverty, and the Bilingual Education Act of 1968, which have impacted Bilingual Education. Bilingual Education went from being a very disputed and despised program in the 1960s to a subject that was viewed as necessary for the educational success of English language learners. Political views were the biggest factor in the support or lack thereof for Bilingual Education, and today political views still determine if Bilingual Education is used. How Bilingual Education is used varies among schools. Since agreement quite possibly may never exist the best thing that can be done is learn from the past to better the future.

Tyler Christian Campbell (2014, T): CLIC@11:30 AM

Title: Lab Activities for Strength of Materials
Major(s): Physics
Advisor(s): Hall
Abstract: I developed several lab activities to explore material properties related to the strength of materials. Procedures have been written to allow other students to perform the experiments in future classes. I built the apparatus necessary to perform two of the experiments and provide sample data for each. The first of these is a tensile test that loads materials in tension and from which the Young's modulus can be determined. The second is a cantilever deflection experiment that uses an electronic strain gauge, from which the Young's modulus can be determined. Both experiments will be described. The later was also built as an interactive display that can be placed in public areas.

Jesse Campton (2012, T): Marsh 101@9:00 AM

Title: The Jesus of America: Examining How American Culture Has Shaped The Son of God
Major(s): Anthropology
Advisor(s): Greer
Abstract: Over the past ten years, the National Study of Youth and Religion has been conducting an exhaustive study of the religious life and beliefs of American youth and young adults through in-depth phone and in-person interviews. The director of the study, sociologist Christian Smith, published a book, Soul Searching: The Religious and Spiritual Lives of American Teenagers, which laid out the study's findings. It is in this analysis that Smith claims that a shift has occurred within American Christianity, in that there is now an adherence to a do-good, feel-good spirituality that has very little to do with the God of Christian tradition. This reshaping of God is the result of applying these three terms, Moralistic, Therapeutic, and Deistic, to both Him and Christianity in general. In doing this, we have reordered Christianity and, more importantly, have turned God into a combination of Divine Butler and a Cosmic Therapist, a mere glimmer of the traditional Christian God. As someone who has personally noticed this shift from within the church, I structured my thesis to further Smith's study in two specific ways. The first was to establish a better understanding of the concepts of morality and individualism as defined by American history and society. The second was to apply these concepts to Jesus and examine how this reshapes and redefines him. I then address why this version of Jesus makes sense and works within contemporary American society and why this is a problem. I conclude my paper by laying out an itinerary for carrying out ethnographic observations and interviews, both of which I hope to do in the near future.

Margarita Can Gongora (2014, T): Price 202@8:30 AM

Title: Modulation of Arachidonic Acid Metabolism in the Rat Kidney by Sulforaphane: Implications for Regulation of Blood Pressure
Major(s): Biology
Advisor(s): Chan
Abstract: We investigated the effects of sulforaphane on modulation of Arachidonic acid (AA) metabolism in the kidney and effect on blood pressure, using spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) as a model. Mean arterial pressure (MAP) was measured weakly. Activity and expression of CYP4A, the key enzyme in the formation of the vasoactive metabolite (20-HETE) and the soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH), which degrades the vasodilator metabolite (EET) were measured in rat kidney microsomes. We found that treatment with SF leads to significant reductions in expression and activity of CYP4A isozymes, as well as the activity of sEH. Additionally, SF prevents development of hypertension by significantly reducing the rise in MAP of developing SHRs. This may represent a novel mechanism by which SF protects SHR rats against the progressive rise in blood pressure.

Sarah Cange (2007, T): Marsh 212@4:00 PM

Title: The Weight of Common Sense on Society and Literature
Major(s): English: Literature
Advisor(s): Steele


Abstract: As one of the most widely read pieces of literature, next to the Bible, Thomas Paine's Common Sense can be seen as an example of the impact and importance of literature. Paine's writing, as an example, shows the impact literature has had in the past, such as the inspiration and motivation Common Sense provided for the Declaration of independence, which is relevant to us today. In the literary world of what was being published at the time, Paine was the first to make literature more available to the common people as well, using a clear and concise language that was not previously written and that passionately and boldly stated and persuaded the need for the colonies to separate from England. It is the power and style in literature, his Common Sense, that led to this decision.

Sarah Cannon (2008, T): McCready Hall@1:00 PM

Title: The Evolution of the Trombone and Trombone Repertoire
Major(s): Music
Advisor(s): Burch-Pesses


Abstract: For my senior project, I am doing a lecture/recital on the history of the trombone and how it has evolved over time, from the use of the sackbut to the development and use of the trombone today. I am researching the overtone series and how it applies to the trombone. I will present information about each of the music history periods (Baroque, Classical, Romantic, and 20th Century) with a well-prepared solo example for each period. I also am researching the use of the trombone during each period, from its start as a vocal accompaniment instrument, to use in the church, to its use in bands and as a solo instrument.

Eric Carlson (2007, T): Marsh 214@1:00 PM

Title: The Woman's Christian Temperance Union of Oregon
Major(s): History
Advisor(s): Lipin


Abstract: The Woman's Christian Temperance Union of Oregon is the oldest group designated specifically for women in the state. It allowed women in the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries to leave the domestic sphere and to enter the male-dominated public sphere as female moral authorities. The WCTU consisted of a variable cornucopia of specific departments that were created to fight individually different aspects in the spread of alcohol consumption, as well as combat many other "social evils."

Joel Carlson (2013, T): Marsh 101@2:00 PM

Title: Credit Default Swaps: an overview of the U.S. market and a model for reference entity risk
Major(s): Economics
Advisor(s): Haag
Abstract: Credit default swaps in the United States have a notional outstanding amount of over $26.2 trillion dollars (ISDA). Over the past decade there has been scarce regulation in the U.S. by the Commodities and Futures Trading Commission, this is a very troubling matter considering the enormous amount of volume traded annually. This study will provide an overview of the credit default swap market in the United States and analyze current regulations to determine if left loosely regulated their potential contribution to the next financial crisis. The basis point spread of the top 25 holding companies in U.S. credit default swaps will be analyzed pre and post U.S. financial crisis of 2007 to determine whether CDS prices adjust to an increase in risk.

Alex Caroline (2014, T): Strain 121@2:30 PM

Title: Periodic out billiards in the hyperbolic plane
Major(s): Mathematics
Advisor(s): Breslin
Abstract: The topic of outer billiards is a relatively new field in geometry with many results waiting to be discovered. In the broadest sense, outer billiards can be thought of as a crude model on how objects will orbit around a body. Two common questions about orbits usually arise: which orbits will eventually repeat, or be periodic, and which orbits will eventually become unbounded, getting farther and farther away from the body. We focus on which orbits in hyperbolic space will be periodic. We define a particular type of orbit called a special orbit. We show that if a convex polygon has a special orbit, then it all of its orbits are periodic orbits.

Jenae Carpenter (2007, T): Marsh LL21@2:00 PM

Title: Keeping Students Connected: The Positive Effect of Service-Learning
Major(s): Social Work
Advisor(s): Doerfler


Abstract: Recent studies demonstrate the positive benefits of service-learning for students of all ages. Service-learning affects students' civic engagement, academic achievement, personal and social development, as well as encourages school-community partnerships and the view of youth as community resources. Benefits are especially high for at-risk youth and low-income students. The practicum student implemented a horticultural service-learning project at Beaver Acres Elementary School. The school courtyard was the focus of the project in order to ultimately provide a safe, nurturing environment for student and faculty engagement. A generalist macro practice change format was utilized for the service-learning project as the students of the fourth and fifth grade worked together to plan and carry out the event. This presentation will highlight the service-learning project process as well as lessons learned.

Simone Carpenter (2011, T): Price 214@2:30 PM

Title: Nonlinear Optics of Warm and Cold Rubidium Vapor
Major(s): Physics
Advisor(s): Dawes
Abstract: We investigate the nonlinear optics of warm and cold rubidium vapor. Atomic vapor samples are used in many experiments because their reaction to electromagnetic fields can be accurately modeled and because they have strong light-matter interactions. The details in comparing a systems nonlinear properties to a theory are complicated by Doppler broadening, multilevel atomic structure, hyperfine substructure, and diffusion of atoms due to collisions. With cold atomic clouds, atomic motion is negligible so the effects of Doppler broadening and collisions are greatly reduced. We observe nonlinear optical pattern formation in warm rubidium vapor at various beam sizes, temperatures, and intensities. Additionally, we compared the experimental results to a basic theoretical model of beam propagation.

Forrest Carpenter (2012, T): McGill Auditorium@8:30 AM

Title: Polychlorinated Biphenol (PCB) and Polybrominated Diphenol Ether (PBDE) levels in Deer Mice (Peromyscus maniculatus) and Gray-backed Voles (Microtus canicausdus) and associated risks to American Kest
Major(s): Environmental Studies
Advisor(s): Van Buskirk
Abstract: American Kestrels (Falco sparverius) are the most widespread falcons in North America. Unfortunately their numbers are decreasing in some regions, particularly the northeastern United States. The focus of this study is to investigate the role that chemical contaminants may play in the decline of the kestrel. I am approaching this problem by looking at the prey species of kestrels, (deer mice and gray-backed voles) to determine the level of contaminants in the liver tissues of these animals. Polychlorinated biphenols (PCB) and polybrominated diphenol ethers (PBDE) are two classes of contaminants that have been shown to reduce reproductive success in captive kestrels treated with known levels of these agents. PBDEs are used as flame retardants in the manufacture of consumer goods and are readily leached into the environment. Deer mice (Peromyscus maniculatus) were salvaged from two farms in the Western Washington county area that were actively trapping and controlling these rodents. The farms were chosen based on their agricultural practices, one being a traditional agriculture establishment that uses pesticides and fertilizers and the other being an organic-based farm that uses natural farming and control methods. The presence of PCBs and PBDEs in the tissues of these rodents is of concern because of the ability of these chemicals to accumulate in the tissues of animals that consume them and become more concentrated as they travel up the food chain.

Claire Carpenter (2014, T): Price 204@8:30 AM

Title: Human impacts on wild canids: Problems facing the Channel Island Fox, Urocyon littoralis
Major(s): Biology
Advisor(s): Lopez
Abstract: With an ever expanding human population the frequency of conflict with wild animals continues to increase. These interactions are negatively affecting the wild canid populations worldwide. Conflict has arisen as a result of canid predation on livestock as well as general proximity to densely populated areas. Coupled with these issues is the increased exposure of canids to domestic diseases such as Canine Distemper Virus (CDV). Especially vulnerable to these influences are species with small population size such as the Critically Endangered Channel Island Fox (Urocyon littoralis). In this Research Analysis I will explore the direct and indirect impacts humans have had on these foxes in the forms of roads, disease, and introduction of predaceous Golden Eagles (Aquila chrysaetos), followed by a discussion of how these problems have influenced the conservation of these foxes.

Kathryn Carr (2012, T): Berglund 200@9:00 AM

Title: "A Catholic Education"
Major(s): English: Creative Writing
Advisor(s): Johnson
Abstract: Drawing from the style of Truman Capote, not only in the context of his use of the slow reveal but also from his method of storytelling, I confront the lasting impression of my Catholic education. The story of my faith is paired with the story of a murder committed by a local priest, which start as separate stories but meld into one narrative. I will explore how these two stories, and the others I have been told, shaped my faith more than any ritual or reading from the Bible. By investigating these stories through Capote's methods, but including a personal narrative, I hope to test the boundaries between the personal essay and a journalistic account.

Vanita Carrillo-Rush (2012, T): Berglund 200@2:30 PM

Title: Suffocating Under a Sealed Bell Jar:The Angel/Monster Dichotomy in the Literary Tradition
Major(s): English: Literature
Advisor(s): Beard
Abstract: The dichotomized roles of women exist both inside and outside of literature. Literature is a device used to substantiate and perpetuate the norms and values already found within culture and society, operating as a powerful tool toward upholding the status quo. The portrayal of women in literature exists as a limiting dichotomy, entrapping female characters in one of two roles: angel or monster. The binary stems back to the beginning of literature, as shown with the Greeks in the mythological character Pandora. The Binary continues into the Garden of Eden with Lilith and Eve, further engraining the idea into society and literature. The thesis focuses on a 20th Century text, Sylvia Plath's The Bell Jar, where the heroine, Esther Greenwood, struggles between her two dictated options. Convention and tradition demand she fit one role, but Esther wants neither, and yet both, suffering the consequences for attempting to exist in the middle. The dichotomy acts as a trap, stripping the female character of all autonomy, forcing her under the suffocating glass of a sealed bell jar.

Isaac Carroll (2011, T): Berglund 230@11:30 AM

Title: Wild World: Purity in Landscape
Major(s): Art
Advisor(s): Shield
Abstract: I paint landscapes and anything else of the natural world. The dominant direction is related to natural scenes I have experienced and been a part of in the past. In many pieces abstract images of a surrealist influence are dominant. These images were inspired by my journeys into nature so they merge with the representational. The abstract parts are my way of expressing the pure, simplified elements of the natural world. The feelings I have when experiencing nature come through in my painting. This brings a shimmer of life to the composition that makes it more than just (in Plato's philosophy) an imitation of the real world. Art should convey an artist's emotion. Color should have the power to interpret these feelings for the viewer. My pieces are more vivid (the orange's more orange, greens greener) than what is seen out in the real world. A piece may look nothing like the original scene in color or composition, but the finished product has combined a bit of me into the scene. I want the viewer to share in the same experiences and emotional journeys expressed in the paintings.

Jessica Carter (2007, T): Taylor Auditorium: Marsh 216@1:00 PM

Title: Nonverbal Cues of Liking and Rejection during Speed Dating
Major(s): Psychology
Advisor(s): Island


Abstract: The goal of this study was to investigate nonverbal behavioral cues of liking and rejection in a speed-dating context. The behavioral coding was modeled and modified from Moore (1985, 1998), in which male and female subjects were observed in singles' bars. The current study employed a controlled field-study context, as speed dating facilitates verification of observed, nonverbal cues using dating cards. Nonverbal cues were coded by four trained observers for rejection and liking signaling. Subjects were also assessed on a Likert-like scale of 1 to 5 for grooming (operationalized) and attractiveness (subjective), and coded behaviors by observers were correlated with actual date choice. It was anticipated that nonverbal cues of liking would be predictive of date choice and nonverbal rejection cues would be linked to lack of choice.

Meghann Carter (2010, T): Price 203@9:00 AM

Title: Small-Scale Application of Photovoltaics as a Versatile Power Source
Major(s): Environmental Studies: Environmental Biology
Advisor(s): Van Buskirk
Gundersen
Abstract: The earth is in crisis. Our overuse of natural resources is reducing the ability of our environment to sustain future generations. Reducing the amount of power and resources we use in our everyday life is one way we as individuals can alleviate the stress humans are collectively putting on our planet. The objective of this project is to design, construct, and implement an environmentally friendly portable power source using photovoltaics and recycled or reclaimed wood products. The designs are based on a solar cart constructed by the Bullock Brothers’ Permaculture Homestead. Permaculture is a way of interacting with the environment based on a scientific understanding of the cycles and rhythms of nature and the principles of caring for the earth and its inhabitants and sharing fairly the bounty of the earth. The goal is to achieve efficiency in the use of space and resources while staying true to the principles and leaving the environment as good as or better than it was. Using solar energy on a movable platform built of reclaimed materials is consistent with the goals of permaculture as it provides a renewable, non-polluting, convenient power source in the field. The solar cart has been used to make electricity available where power from the grid may not be readily accessible. The availability of a power source based on renewable energy will reduce the need to pull power from non-renewable sources of electricity during the middle of the day, a time when peak demands are generally placed on our system. The use of reclaimed materials for the construction of the cart also reduces the pressure on landfills. The solar power apparatus is built a utility cart and equipped with electrical outlets, a battery for power storage, and speakers. The completed solar cart will be implemented at the B-Street Permaculture Institute in Forest Grove, Ore. to determine its effectiveness in a temperate rainforest climate.

Elizabeth Carter (2011, T): Marsh 101@11:30 AM

Title: Pro-Social Contagion: Non-Traditional Kindness in a Traditional World
Major(s): Psychology
Advisor(s): Island
Abstract: This study of behavioral contagion explored one potential antecedent of reciprocal kindness among college students. Age was examined as a comparative factor between traditional students and non-traditional students, as well as culture, mood, sex and relational factors (e.g., familiarity). Participants were distributed "kindness packages" to students around campus (pseudorandomly). The kindness bags contained a blurb about random acts of kindness (RAK) and the package was a "RAK" and to continue the good will to others. They were told that in order to document who received a gift and who did not, we asked for their name and email. The following day, a link to a SurveyMonkey 20-item measure was emailed to all participants. The survey assessed motivational factors that might initiate an act of kindness, as well a descriptive checklist to ascertain how participants defined kindness. Given the literature on prosocial behavior (see Batson et al., 1987) it was predicted that acts of kindness were associated with participant's self-reported (1) emotional state, (2) perceived self-efficacy, (3) familiarity with the recipient, as well as (4) age (positively correlated) and with (5) gender, such that females would be more likely to engage in random acts of kindness with strangers. Although there were no significant quantitative differences in self-reported number of RAKs between traditional and non-traditional students (age), there were significant qualitative differences between traditional and non-traditional students. Non-traditional students had more stringent criteria for what defined an act of "kindness" (e.g., helping a stranger find an address) in comparison to traditional students (e.g., opening the door for a stranger).

Kelsey Carter (2011, P): Strain Hall 3rd Floor@3:00 PM

Title: Optimizing artificial nest box design to maximize yearly occupancy of the American kestrel (Falco sparverius) and reduce attraction of a common nest competitor, the European starling (Sturnus vulgaris
Major(s): Biology
Advisor(s): Alkaslassy
Abstract: The American kestrel, Falco sparverius, is one of the most abundant falcons in North America. However, it is facing potentially threatening changes in habitat and environment. This proposal offers an alteration to a traditional nest box design to supplement wild nesting sites. The European starling, Sturnus vulgaris, is an invasive species and nest competitor for F. sparverius. My goal is to develop a nest box that deters S. vulgaris and thus create more nest sites for F. sparverius. I plan to analyze nest box usage by F. sparverius prior to the installation of brighter nest boxes to determine where best to place them. I will modify an existing, simple nest box design by adding a small window to allow more natural light inside the box. Light may allow F. sparverius better visibility within the box. It may, however, indicate the level of predation risk for S. vulgaris and thus deter them. Lastly, long term monitoring plans will be implemented to determine the success of the new nest box design. Success will be determined by F. sparverius occupancy rates and yearly fledging rates.

Lana Carter (2011, T): Strain 121@9:00 AM

Title: A Cops and Robbers Game
Major(s): Mathematics
Advisor(s): Neudauer
Abstract: Pursuit invasion games are used to model or explain a variety of real life situations where a team of pursers tries to capture an invader. The math that goes along with these games have been studied immensely throughout the years, tracing back to the work of Pierre Bouguer, who in 1732 studied the problem of a pirate ship pursuing a fleeing vessel. Pursuit games have been associated with many different categories and have thus been studied in a variety of ways and techniques. A discrete version of the game was introduced by Nowakowski, which eventually paved the way to the cops and robbers game. This project follows the work that was done by Tina Zhang, of Bard College, who studied the number of cops needed to catch one robber on a finite graph. Taking into consideration the rules of the game, the goal of this project is to calculate the cop number for various classes of graphs and graph minors to generalize theorems or rules that can be used to find the number of cops needed on a certain graph.

Jordan Carter (2012, T): Taylor Auditorium: Marsh 216@1:00 PM

Title: Silverwood Theme Park: 25 Years, Millions of Memories
Major(s): Media Arts: Integrated Media
Advisor(s): Geraci
Abstract: I have developed a web site for the marketing and communications department at Silverwood Theme Park to celebrate the park's 25-year anniversary. Silverwood is located in Athol, Idaho, near Spokane, Washington, and is the largest theme park in the northwest. My project is designed to generate exposure and anticipation for the upcoming season by celebrating the park's history and its guests' lasting memories. When navigating to the web site, the user will be able to watch videos of guests and staff sharing their favorite memory and explore an interactive timeline full of information about the park's 25-year history. I will discuss the process of creating the website, including the planning, designing, and implementation procedure.

Kristen Carter (2013, T): Taylor Auditorium: Marsh 216@11:30 AM

Title: Visual Effects for "Neon Black" – Those Floating Screen Thingy-ma-jiggers
Major(s): Media Arts: Integrated Media
Advisor(s): Geraci
Abstract: In conjunction with fellow Media Arts senior, Richard Murphy, I have designed and implemented a series of gesture based visual effects for his capstone film "Neon Black". For the film, I created the holographic hand interfaces that serve as futuristic information devices. In doing so, I created looping widgets, animated desktop backgrounds, layouts, and various types of icons to fit in with the world created by Richard. In my presentation, I will discuss the planning, design, and production of the holographic hand interfaces for "Neon Black".

Jennifer Carter (2014, T): Price 202@2:30 PM

Title: Response to Added Mass: Do Humans Self-optimize in the Presence of External Pressures?
Major(s): Exercise Science
Advisor(s): Schot
Abstract: It is often reported that animal and human gait exhibits self-optimizing behavior. Walking efficiency is maximized when the stride frequency matches the resonant frequency of the swinging leg; however this does not occur as automatically for humans as other animals. This may be attributable to the lack of meaningful selection pressures for humans, but it is possible that self-optimizing responses would be elicited when a challenge is imposed. Purpose: To examine how added mass affects gait behaviors under self-selected walking speed conditions. Methods: 14 healthy young adults of varying heights consented to participate. Walking tests were conducted on 5 on separate days. All consisted of treadmill walking under self-selected conditions for 0.5 miles after reaching steady state heart rate. Sessions 1 and 5 served as baseline conditions. In sessions 2-4, participants wore a vest loaded with 30% of their body weight while walking. Analysis: Correlations between the resonant frequency and the stride frequency used under self-selected walking conditions will be examined to assess self-optimization tendencies. Changes in other measures (e.g., heart rate, efficiency, stride length and frequency, walking speed) across the 5 sessions will be analyzed via repeated measures ANOVA. Results: Findings will be reported at the presentation.

Carolyn Cartwright (2013, T): Price 214@11:00 AM

Title: Experiences of Pre-Performance Preparation among Professional Musicians
Major(s): Exercise Science
Advisor(s): Withycombe
Abstract: Studies examining individual methods of pre-performance preparation among athletes are common in the field of sports psychology. Similarly there are numerous articles published in the performing arts community outlining the best pre-performance practices for musicians. However, little research has examined pre-performance preparation from the musicians' perspective using the performance enhancement models of sport psychology. Literature shows that the foundational premises of sport psychology are built upon the conception of performance and competition. Many athletes engage in performance enhancement practices to achieve their highest state of performance during competition. Similarly, it is posited that musicians too engage in pre-performance enhancement rituals to achieve success. By exploring the use of sport psychology/performance enhancement modules in the world of professional musical performance, new ideas and experiences might come to the foreground. The purpose of this study is to investigate the individual pre-performance practices of professional musicians, using phenomenological interviews. For this study pre-performance is defined as the time when the musician begins working on the performance piece lasting until and through the actual performance. The limited scholarship available on pre-performance preparation amongst professional musicians makes phenomenology an apt avenue for exploration. Phenomenology will allow the researcher to obtain the first-person experiences of professional musicians with particular emphasis on their experiences of preparing for performance. In this study 6 professional musicians, 3 of whom were also professional conductors, were interviewed. Preliminary outcomes include themes of discipline, rigor and in-depth study of music, and a desire for perfection in performance. Results to be discussed on Senior Projects Day.

Channasy Casio (2008, T): Price 203@2:30 PM

Title: Antibiotic Resistance: The Search for New Treatment for MRSA
Major(s): Biology
Advisor(s): Halpern


Abstract: Antibiotic resistance is a growing concern in the medical and pharmacy industry. The widespread abuse and misuse of antibiotics has allowed bacteria to develop stronger strains, decreasing the effects of antibiotics. This growing problem has produced deadly strains, such as the Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus (MRSA). Only five antibiotics out of twelve families have been proven to treat MRSA. This number is dwindling as new strains of MRSA become resistant to antibiotics. The need for a new treatment is a growing concern because doctors and pharmacists cannot create new antibiotics as fast as bacteria are becoming resistant. Using older antibiotics such as Disulfamide helps treat MRSA. Because of the variance of strains, a number of antibiotics, such as Tetraycycline and Linezolid, have been proven to work, but effectiveness also varies based on the age of the patient. Desperation has led doctors and pharmacists to try alternative treatments, as well as combining antibiotics that have already been created. Combining antibiotics such as “the last resort” antibiotic Vancomycin with Linezolid works better than just using one or the other. When all else fails, patients have been using Manuka Honey as topical treatment for CA-MRSA.

Brianna Castellini (2014, T): Berglund 139@10:30 AM

Title: The Secret Life of Blogging: Storytelling in the 21st Century
Major(s): English: Creative Writing
Advisor(s): Postma
Abstract: My thesis consists of the first three chapters of a modern epistolary novel titled The Secret Life of Jane. Using the conventions of blogging, I tell the story of Hailey Jane Harper's final semester of high school. After finishing five months of intensive therapy for stress-induced self-harm, Hailey's life isn't about to get any easier. Because her friends, family, and over 1000 dedicated followers read her public blog, she's unable to share all of her secrets and pain because she'll hurt the people closest to her. Thus she creates "The Secret Life of Jane," a blog in which she and all the people in her life are given pseudonyms and she can without restraint say what is on her mind. In my novel, Hailey still maintains her original blog, HailstoneHarper.com, thus creating an interesting contrast between what she's telling the people who follow her and what she reveals on her anonymous, private blog. As her last year of high school progresses and tension escalates, her blogs begin to tell the tale of a girl who may not be ready for a post-therapy life. While researching my thesis, I examined other modern epistolary young adult novels such as The Princess Diaries by Meg Cabot, My Most Excellent Year by Steve Kluger, and The Perks of Being a Wallflower by Stephen Chbotsky. I'm interested in the epistolary form and its relevance after centuries of existence. I see it as a necessary component in telling the stories of teenage characters today. Young adults, often trapped by circumstances outside of their control, can find a means of catharsis and identity negotiation with their diaries, emails, and now blogs.

Kihei Castillo (2009, T): Price 214@10:30 AM

Title: Cooperative Breeding in Class Aves
Major(s): Biology
Advisor(s): Halpern
Abstract: “It takes a village to raise a child” is an African Proverb that relates to hundreds of birds and mammals that participate in cooperative breeding. Cooperative breeding is a behavior in which more than one individual assists in caring for young that are not their own. In this capstone project, I focus on cooperative breeding in the Class Aves because of the various theories that surround this behavior. The seminar will look at possible causes such as kin selection and altruism and examine how the group benefits from this behavior. I will then examine the helpers, to determine who they are and the reasons they stay to help raise young that are not their own.

Katie Castillo (2011, T): Marsh 201@10:00 AM

Title: Psychobiography of Elliott Smith, Part 2
Major(s): Psychology
Advisor(s): Schultz
Abstract: Part two of a five part group psychobiography of the brilliant and doomed Portland songwriter Elliott Smith. An attachment-based analysis of Smith's psychology and art is presented, centering on adult attachment-related strategies such as hyperactivation and deactivation, and how each was reflected in Smith's personal--and artistic--life. Also, one of Smith's most confessional songs, Waltz #2, is interpreted in light of his early life history.

Michele Castro (2012, T): Marsh 206@10:30 AM

Title: Promotion or Deterrence? An Examination of U.S. Foreign Policy and Lebanon's Democracy
Major(s): Politics and Government
Advisor(s): Van Dyk
Moore
Abstract: This thesis seeks a deeper understanding of U.S. foreign policy through a case study of the United States' effect on Lebanese democracy. Some observers see the United States as a great promoter of democracy, while others believe the U.S. acts to enhance its own power. This study considers the character of U.S. policy by examining the complicated case of Lebanon, which has an unusual confessional system of representative government. To explore the questions I researched the explicit and public policies of USAID, U.S. Department of State, Office of Transition Initiatives, and certain U.S. backed United Nations policies. Findings were broken up into two phases of U.S. foreign policy interest: the Averted-Eyes Phase and the Priority Phase. Once broken up into these phases policies were then analyzed and categorized as contra-democracy, pro-democracy, indirectly affecting democracy, or no effect at all. Analysis found that the effect of U.S. foreign policies on Lebanese democracy was small, and not clearly promoting or deterring democracy.

C.J. Ceria (2010, T): Taylor Auditorium: Marsh 216@2:00 PM

Title: Web Site Design and Development for Cathy A. Cupp Counseling
Major(s): Media Arts: Integrated Media
Advisor(s): Geraci
Abstract: Cathy A Cupp is a counselor working in Pendleton, Oregon. Cathy specializes and treats many chronic and acute trauma issues in a casual, comfortable, and confidential environment. By working closely with the client from the ground up, I have designed and created a web site for Cathy Cupp that reflects the values and qualities of her practice. The website’s goals are to attract new clients and allow Cathy to connect with other counselors like her. Through a simple yet elegant visual design and navigation system, users are able to explore the site’s content such as Cathy’s credentials, services that she offers, and the means to interact with her. Through this web site, I hope that potential clients will be encouraged to engage in counseling so that they may get help with their issues and improve the quality of their life.

Miguel Cervantes (2012, T): McGill Auditorium@1:30 PM

Title: B Street Permaculture Project Mini-Festival
Major(s): Environmental Studies w/ Sustainable Design Emphasis
Advisor(s): Gundersen
Abstract: As an environmental studies student, I have become aware of the consequences of our society's energy consumption, our inadequate, wasteful food system, and the fundamental disconnect between humans and nature. In addition, most people live fast-paced stressful lives that decrease human interaction causing people to feel isolated and unattached from their local community. These environmental problems have inspired me to investigate ways to create community while educating and inspiring people about the value of natural systems and human interaction. My senior project involved the design, planning, and implementation of a community festival, at the B Street Permaculture Project. The objectives of this project were to bring people together and provide access to a facility that will educate, connect, and inspire people in a natural setting which will impact them physically as well as psychologically. This project involved creation of an amphitheatre at the B Street Permaculture Project, which will be a key physical aspect of a community festival that will involve entertainment, food, and social interaction. Local community partners (schools, businesses, and local non-profits) will be invited to participate with the festival. This project is based in the belief that creating a community space in an ecological setting can be the first step in the transformation to a more sustainable way of life. In addition, I have learned that it is possible to ignite a passion in people for regaining vital relationships with others and with nature.

Chelsey Chamberlain (2012, T): Berglund 200@8:30 AM

Title: Stepping Up to the Plate: Distinct Women Roles in Baseball Literature
Major(s): English: Literature
Advisor(s): Johnson
Abstract: What role do women play in sports literature? For my thesis I will be examining the roles of women in sports literature and what it tells us about gender and sports in the real world today. In "A League of Their Own," "Field of Dreams," and "The Natural," women characters take on an extremely important roles that are often diminished in the societies they live in. Just like the underestimated roles they play in contemporary society, they are equally devalued in their ability to influence the outcome of the novels, thus, showing their influence over a world they aren't always welcomed into because of their gender.

Chelsea Chamizo (2007, T): Marsh LL21@2:30 PM

Title: The Pain of Grief: Guiding Family and Friends of the Deceased Through the Bereavement Process
Major(s): Social Work
Advisor(s): Doerfler


Abstract: Bereavement is defined as the period after a significant loss in which grief is experienced and mourning occurs. Bereavement impacts the physical, emotional, and psychological aspects of the life of an individual who has lost someone to whom he or she was close. Having worked closely with the patients and their family members, the social work practicum student provides a valuable resource in guiding those close to the deceased patient through the bereavement process. Methods utilized include open conversation, support, guided mourning, and resources and referral services. This experience took place at Hospice Care of the Northwest, which provides services to clients in Portland, Salem, Beaverton, Tigard, Hillsboro, and Forest Grove who have a less than six-month life expectancy.

Jessica Chan (2013, T): Price 214@1:00 PM

Title: The Role of Free Radical Oxygen in Patients with Lupus and Diabetes: What Are the Cost-Benefits of a Diet Rich in Polyphenolic Compounds?
Major(s): Biology
Advisor(s): Livingston
Abstract: Patients with diabetes in lupus have high levels of oxidative stress as indicated by elevated levels lipid peroxides and carbonylated proteins in their blood. Polyphenolic compounds, ubiquitously found in foods, act as antioxidants against oxidative stress, a normal byproduct of cellular processing. However diets with high polyphenolic compounds have been shown to cause decreased levels of iron in the blood. This suggests that there are cost-benefits of a diet rich in polyphenolic compounds in individuals with diabetes and lupus. When rats with diabetes were given polyphenols their kidneys more closely resembled that of the healthy non-diabetic mouse (low oxidative stress). However, individuals with diabetes and lupus, also tend to experience anemia stemming from the lack of iron in the blood. Anemia even in healthy patients with no chronic diseases can lead to other severe health problems. A study on Guatemalan children showed that consuming high levels of polyphenols, such as in coffee, while taking an iron supplement, had a decreased uptake of iron compared to those that didn't consume polyphenols. Polyphenolic compounds could help to alleviate the negative effects of oxidative stress from diabetes and lupus, but they can also exacerbate anemia. Physician and patients with diabetes and lupus should carefully monitor iron blood levels if a patient consumes a polyphenolic rich diet as treatment for their disease.

Megan Chan (2014, P): Strain Hall 3rd Floor@11:00 AM

Title: Development of Belimumab Drug for Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Patients Through Advances in DNA Sequencing
Major(s): Biology
Advisor(s): Clark
Abstract: Although the Sanger method is able to yield long contiguous DNA sequence reads, utilizing this method of genome sequencing drastically limits the efficiency of sequencing projects. While Illumina, a Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) method, has the potential for high sequence yields, sequencing still requires expensive equipment to carry out. These NGS methods have revolutionized both the speed and cost of DNA sequencing needed for projects such as research into the treatment of genetic diseases. The discovery of belimumab, a drug used for the treatment of Systemic Lupus Erythematosus patients and the first ever FDA approved drug derived from genomics, was made possible by NGS methods that aided in the research into the genetic basis of lupus. Despite the high costs and concern over the side effects, the discovery of belimumab has opened the doors for the treatment of genetic diseases. The impact of genomics in medicine has only just begun and the potential for other discoveries still lies ahead.

Breanna Chandler (2011, T): McGill Auditorium@10:30 AM

Title: Elements of Man and Nature
Major(s): Environmental Studies w/ Sustainable Design Emphasis
Advisor(s): O'Day
Abstract: Environmentalists are faced with the daily challenges of staying optimistic in regards to information about man's impact on earth. Constantly being bombarded with news about the undesirable effects of human activities, such water privatization and the depletion of resources is overwhelming. How can we transform relentless negativity into a positive action for change? This project seeks to answer that question by combining Performing Arts with Environmental Studies to create an event that brings together fellow peers facing a difficult and depressing world and give them inspiration and hope. Through live performance, the human relationship to the environment is described, showing ways in which the natural world can be manipulated by man's involvement.  In the performance, trained dancers embodied the natural patterns of the four elements of earth, wind, fire, and water.  Man's influence on natural processes were demonstrated through movements by non-artist dancers. The story was carried out through live music with choreographed and improvisational movement. As the movement progressed, a shift in understanding arose in the interactions between man and nature. Through artistic expression from musicians, dancers, and painters, this performance provided a common ground to convey a message of environmental awareness in an uplifting and inspiring way.

Christiana Chandler (2012, P): Price 1st Floor Hallway@1:00 PM

Title: Prolonged Exposure Effects of an Energy Bracelet on Functional Balance
Major(s): Exercise Science
Advisor(s): Schot
Abstract: Various energy bracelets claim to be able to improve athletic performance in power, balance, and flexibility by correcting flawed biofield patterns. Biofields are believed to be forms of energy that permeate the body. These energies are not able to be measured currently, but are believed to exert significant influence over a broad range of health and functional considerations. There is little to no objective evidence supporting the effectiveness of these types of products. Purpose: The purpose of this project was to apply a rigorous double-blind testing protocol to examine the effects of prolonged wear of the PowerBalance bracelet (PBB) on several posture control tasks. Methods: Half of the bracelets were deactivated (hologram removed) and all were modified to shield the original hologram location. A colleague not associated with the study assigned codes to the supply of bracelets and no investigator or subject had knowledge of which code was the intact product. Participants performed a series of 3 tests at 3 separate sessions over the course of 6 weeks. The 3 posture control tests included (1) single-leg landing from a maximum vertical jump, (2) single-leg stance on a dynamic (viscoelastic foam) surface with eyes open, and (3) single-leg stance on a stable surface with eyes closed. Day 1 served as an acclimation and practice session and no bracelets were worn. Day 2 repeated the tests under 3 conditions: no bracelet, with a neutralized bracelet and with an intact bracelet. Testing order was counterbalanced. At the end of the session, a bracelet was randomly assigned to be worn continuously for 6 weeks. Day 3, 6 weeks later, included testing with the assigned bracelet and then without a bracelet. Analysis: The prolonged exposure influence of the bracelet on the posture control test results will be evaluated via a 2 x 2 mixed effects ANOVA (?=0.05). Results: Results will be discussed at the time of presentation.

Davis Chang (2013, T): Berglund 232@8:30 AM

Title: Exploring the Radical Scavenging Properties of Curcumin and its Derivatives
Major(s): Chemistry
Advisor(s): Ciochina
Abstract: Curcumin, a yellow pigment found in the Indian spice turmeric (affiliated with curry powder), has multiple therapeutic activities including antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial, and anticarcinogenic activities. However, the utility of curcumin is limited by its intense staining color, lack of water solubility, and relatively low bioavailability. Therefore, there has been a search for a "super curcumin" which does not have these problems. Specifically, we analyzed curcumin's radical scavenging ability in comparison to six other derivatives of curcumin that were synthesized in our lab. Using a DPPH free radical scavenging assay and ABTS radical cation decolorization assay, the radical scavenging ability was examined and found that curcumin continued to have the best antioxidant capabilities in comparison to all other derivatives of focus.

Logan Channer (2012, T): Marsh 206@1:30 PM

Title: A Formula for Religious Democracy: Synthesizing the Rule of God and Man
Major(s): Politics and Government
Advisor(s): Van Dyk
Seward
Abstract: This project examines past and potential future syntheses between religious and democratic institutions. After briefly discussing the theoretical viability of such systems, the focus shifts to an evaluation of specific historical governments that sought to include both democratic and religious elements. This paper focuses its attention on the cases of Modern Iran and Calvin's Geneva, as well as a few smaller examples. The results of this investigation take the form of four principles that any architect of a religious democracy should keep in mind and these can be divided into two categories. The first two, which aim to shield religious institutions, are that 1) any such system should have powerful but well defined roles for religious leaders and that 2) religious matters should be insulated from legislative meddling for the most part. The other two aim to limit religious institutions, stating that 3) religious leaders must provide specific scriptural documentation when wielding their power and that 4) override powers should be given to democratic institutions in extreme circumstances. These principles, when properly applied to the unique context of a given country should help avoid the traps that have plagued religious democracies of the past.

Megan Chapman (2014, T): Marsh 106@1:30 PM

Title: "Head First" Post-Concussive Syndrome Among College Students
Major(s): Psychology
Advisor(s): Island
Abstract: The incidence and prevalence of mild traumatic brain injury is increasing. Currently, traumatic brain injury occurs at least 1.7 million times a year in North America. Concussions are characterized by a traumatically induced alteration in mental status not necessarily resulting in loss of consciousness. Memory and attention are the most sensitive mechanisms following a traumatic brain injury, especially those areas responsible for information processing and working memory. There is also evidence of deficiencies in both phonemic and semantic fluency among individuals who have sustained a concussion. The affect of a head injury on visual process is varied, some documented symptoms include: visual perception loss in all or specific regions of the field, loss of oculomotor function, diplopia, and reduced binocular fusion. Attitudes toward contact sports have changed more towards high impact rather than safety over the years, leading to higher incidences of sports-related concussions within the last half-decade. However, athletes are not the only population affected by concussion; those within the general population are also susceptible to head injury. Professors are not always privy to students' physical challenges in the classroom this is especially true if a student recently incurred a mild head injury. Similarly, students are often unaware that there are a number of accommodations or adjustments that could be made to help them succeed in their courses. This study examines the holistic effects of brain injury within a college student population and ways in which faculty may help support those students.

Carrie Charlton (2011, T): Price 203@9:00 AM

Title: Male choice for female flank spots in the Australian diamond firetail (Stagonopluera guttata)
Major(s): Biology
Advisor(s): Lopez
Abstract: The native Australian diamond firetail (Stagonopleura guttata) was investigated to understand how males choose their mates. Although this species of bird is sexually monomorphic females tend to have a higher spot number on their flanks than males and the spot numbers of females show a wide variance. The study took place in Adelaide, South Australia at the aviaries on the Flinders University campus during the onset of the diamond firetail breeding season. The females in this study were grouped into spot number categories: low, medium, and high. A focal male was given the opportunity to choose between three females, one from each spot number category, and a control male. Each trial was videotaped and played back for analysis. The amount of time each male spent with each choice was quantified, and percent choice was calculated as the time spent by the focal male in front of each choice divided by the time spent in front of all four choices. A second set of trials was performed using the same females after modifying their number of flank spots. The original high spot number females became the low spot females, and the original low and medium spot number females became the medium and high spot females, respectively. The same methods for trials and quantification of choice were used. Results indicate that male diamond firetails showed a significant preference for females with higher flank spot numbers in both sets of trials.

Elaine Charpentier-Philippi (2011, T): Marsh 106@2:00 PM

Title: A Place to Connect: Understanding the Impact and Influences of Biophilia
Major(s): Social Work
Advisor(s): Schweitzer
Abstract: Increasing rates of childhood obesity and poor food behavior in that same population have risen to the forefront of our national consciousness, even gaining the personal attention of our First Lady. Simultaneously, community gardens and permaculture farms are cropping up in powerful numbers nationally expressing the value that many place on healthy foods. Outcomes associated with participation in such projects include the increased intake of fresh fruits and vegetables, increased physical fitness, awareness of benefits of organic produce, and augmented choices that promote healthier living. Emerging literature suggests that community gardens may improve social capital, which in turn can influence efficacy. This Senior Capstone project focuses on the influence of gardens and permaculture farms on personal efficacy. Utilizing a comparison group of participants at Pacific University's own B-Street Permaculture Farm, a quantitative and qualitative survey instrument was designed and implemented in effort to capture food behavior and social outcomes. Emerging theory, survey development and analysis, and results as well as limitations are discussed.

Jordan Chase (2011, T): Berglund 200@4:30 PM

Title: Milton's Principle of Matter: Why Angels Bleed in Paradise Lost
Major(s): English: Literature
Advisor(s): Browning
Abstract: In Paradise Lost, Milton imagines a very different universe than that of traditional Christianity, which tends to pose a metaphysical gulf between the sacred and profane. I will show how and why Milton rejects this traditional view by exploring the cosmology of the poem at a material level. For Milton, the same stuff of creation (matter) makes up the spiritual realm as well as the corporeal, angels as well as humans, Heaven as well as Hell. And because of this material bond, even the most disparate parts of his universe share commonalities, and these must be explicated, must be understood, to give us a fuller, richer reading of the poem and a more accurate picture of Milton's metaphysics.

Kelly Chastain (2013, T): Berglund 139@11:30 AM

Title: A Choir of Soloists: Creating Distinct Voices for First-Person Narrators
Major(s): English: Creative Writing
Advisor(s): Postma
Abstract: My creative writing thesis includes the first two chapters of my historical novel, titled Deception, as well as a critical study of Tracy Chevalier's The Lady and the Unicorn. Set in the Austrian Empire in 1832, my novel follows the protagonist, Anneliese, as she attempts to pick up where her murdered father left off: Starting a revolution in Hungary. The story is told by five different narrators. This strategy allows me to take the reader into diverse settings and situations, including a drunken tavern brawl, a masquerade party at a Viennese palace, and a print shop that doubles as the Hungarian Nationalists' meeting hall. Narrators represent widely different social classes, levels of education, and beliefs. In order to have their first-person narrations reflect those backgrounds and the distinct personality of each character, I rely on various sentence structures, languages, local idioms and slang. In the critical portion of my thesis, I study how Tracy Chevalier crafted seven different first-person character narrators in a historical setting. While Chevalier's novel offers some useful techniques in this regard, I push my own work farther in order to employ a variety of speaking rhythms and habits. My goal is help the reader experience characters and their individual stories as much as possible through their own distinct voices.

Lisa Chee (2011, P): Strain Hall 2nd Floor@2:00 PM

Title: Effects of Ethinyl Estradiol on Bone Mass Density in Adolescent Female Athletes
Major(s): Biology
Advisor(s): Alkaslassy
Abstract: Contraception is a common technique used to prevent unwanted pregnancies and the spread of sexually transmitted diseases. The original type of contraception was created using animal intestines, in Egypt in 1350 BC. Today we have more advanced and effective methods of preventing unwanted pregnancies. These include condoms prepared from latex containing spermicide, as well as intrauterine devices, vaginal rings, trans-dermal patches and oral contraceptive pills. Although contraception is commonly used in society, many women are unaware of how long term use of these products may affect their overall health and well-being in the future. Specifically, the estrogen hormone called ethinyl estradiol (E.E. or oestrogen) can have a negative effect on developing bones. E.E. reduces bone density via hormones (e.g. calcitonin) that regulate calcium balance. Female athletes must endure a lot of physical strains to their bones during training and conditioning; thus, how might consumption of oral contraceptives affect developing bones (e.g. peak bone mass) in athletic female adolescents between 14-18 years of age? Is osteoporosis a greater risk for adolescent female athletes engaging in weight-bearing exercise and using hormonal oral contraception, compared to those who use non-hormonal contraception?

Po-Jui Chen (2009, T): Marsh 106@4:30 PM

Title: External Debts and Inflation
Major(s): Economics
Advisor(s): Ruder
Abstract: Inflation occurs when governments increase the money supply at a faster rate than the economy’s production of goods and services grows. When national governments face a heavy debt load much of the money collected in taxes must be used to purchase foreign currency with which to pay foreign creditors and relatively little can be allocated toward providing goods and services to the citizenry. Given the desperate short-term need in heavily indebted poor countries, it is expected that governments facing large external debt loads will be more likely to follow inflationary policies as they struggle to meet the immediate needs of their citizenry with scarce public resources. This study investigates whether national inflation rates are higher in heavily indebted countries, controlling for other determinants of inflation.

Peter Cherney (2010, T): Berglund 200@10:30 AM

Title: The Perpetual Poem: On Revising Life and Writing
Major(s): English: Creative Writing
Advisor(s): Pagan
Abstract: Much criticism of poet Robert Lowell's work centers on his shift from heroic, impersonal poetry to deeply confessional poetry lamenting his life and, indirectly, the state of the world. However, I argue that Lowell's changed style is not merely legitimate but, moreover, worthy of some emulation. I also hold that Lowell's approach to his craft, involving fastidious, unrelenting revision of his work, might well guide a young writer. By Lowell, I have been inspired to further develop my own voice personally and poetically. This thesis includes results – reflected in a critical essay and a short collection of poems – of my processes of revision.

Samantha Cherrington (2007, T): Marsh 212@8:30 AM

Title: "In What Other Light Can They Look Upon Us But As Invaders Of Their Country?"
Major(s): History
Advisor(s): Barlow


Abstract: Since the first landing of Captain Cook in 1778 until the recent push for sovereignty, it is clear to see that two very important questions run parallel through historians' works on the history of the Sandwich Islands. Thus the common themes found in their writings on Hawaiian history are as follows: who is responsible for the dismemberment of the Sandwich Islands, and should the annexation of Hawai'i as a State be attributed to Western influence or to the native Hawaiians themselves? This adversarial aspect of Hawaiian history, wanting to make a judgment upon a race, is slowly changing in the writings of today. In this presentation I examine key works in Hawaiian history to demonstrate that Hawaiian history has gone from moral judgments about causation to modern ideas of complex causation with subtle nuances and fewer moral judgments.

Seth Chicas (2011, T): McGill Auditorium@4:00 PM

Title: An investigation of PBDE Congeners in American Kestrels (Falco sparverius) in Washington County, Oregon
Major(s): Environmental Science: Biology
Advisor(s): Van Buskirk
Abstract: American kestrels, Falco sparverius, are a species of small falcon. Though not threatened in the Pacific Northwest, populations of Falco sparverius in other regions of North America have exhibited declines during the past 10 years. Exposure to environmental contaminants such as PBDE is among the factors hypothesized to play a role in the decline of kestrel populations. PBDE, a chemical that is commonly used as a flame retardant in plastic and other materials, has been found to leach into the environment. It is known to reduce eggshell thickness and lower reproductive success in kestrels. This study will determine the extent to which PBDEs are bioaccumulating in kestrels living in the vicinity of Pacific University. During the summer of 2010, kestrels in Washington County, OR were captured, measured and banded for identification and tracking. Addled eggs and deceased abandoned chicks collected from nest sites were analyzed for PBDE content using Gas Chromatography - Electron Capture Detection (GC-ECD). Knowledge of the level of PBDEs in kestrels will guide further investigations of the health of local falcon populations.

Kurtis Childers (2009, T): Price 202@4:00 PM

Title: Drug Metabolism and the Preventing Drug-Drug Interaction
Major(s): Chemistry
Advisor(s): Harrelson
Johnson
Abstract: Cytochrome 3A4 (CYP3A4), a member of the P450 family, metabolizes approximately 50% of the pharmaceutical drugs in the market. With such important clinical correlation and relevance, complete characterization and understanding of CYP3A4 is limited. Mechanistic characterization of CYP3A4-ligand interactions has proven difficult because CYP3A4 can bind multiple ligands simultaneously and generate multiple products from a single ligand. A system to assess the contribution of ligand dynamics using intramolecular isotope effects and product rations is being pursued. CYP3A4 mediated oxidation of m-xylene-alpha-2H3 generates two products, 2,4-dimethylphenol (2,4-D) and m-benzylalcohol (m-BA). A concentration-dependent increase in the product ratio 2,4-D: m-BA was observed of 1.3 ± 0.2 and 3.7 ± 0.7 at 6 µM and 1000 µM, respectively. Using m-xylene-alpha- 2H3 as a probe, effector studies were conducted where two different ligands were in the presence of CYP3A4 at the same time. The effectors used were p-xylene and p-xylene-alpha- alpha'-2H6. By metabolizing more than one ligand at the same time, deviations from the original ligand can be observe so full characterization and affects from allosterism can be studied. With more of an understanding on the molecular scale and understanding the mechanism of such an important enzyme, this may prove useful in the drug industry in preventing drug-drug interaction.

Victoria Chinn (2012, T): Marsh 101@9:30 AM

Title: A Bio-cultural Perspective on the Adaptation of the Traditional Maori Lifestyle
Major(s): Anthropology
Advisor(s): Greer
Abstract: A high prevalence of varying chronic illnesses has exploded across the map in recent history. Affluent diseases are the leading cause of death in developed countries while they were of no significance in ancient indigenous societies. Current research and archaeological evidence reveals the Maori were a vigorously fit population as a product of their ancient lifestyle. Modern indigenous people, including the Maori, now fall victim to this epidemic; in many instances to a higher degree than people of European descent. This new epidemic suggests a current inconsistency between the modern lifestyle in developed countries and what a healthy body requires. The Maori indigenous perspective outlines a healthy way of living which supported an ancient civilization before European influence. This paper aims to highlight significant and positive aspects of traditional Maori lifestyle and the consequences which have developed as a result of deviating from this traditional way of life.

Krystal Chitwood (2012, T): Marsh 101@8:30 AM

Title: Playing Undead: The Integration of Zombies into Popular Culture and the Creation of a Subculture
Major(s): Anthropology
Advisor(s): Greer
Abstract: In recent years, images of zombies have begun to assault the living. These undead creatures have shambled their way into Jane Austen, run across the television scene in AMC's The Walking Dead and hunted their human prey to near extinction in countless movies. These apocalyptic creatures have never been more popular which brings to question: why now are these creatures just gaining such popularity? The first zombie film was in the 1930's, yet since the late 1990's and into the 2000's zombies have become more than horror figures used for bloody violence. There are now popular zombie walks and even conventions. Using field work conducted at Seattle's ZomBcon and interviews with professionals who deal in zombies, this research deals with not only the "why zombies?" question, but also begins to unravel what zombies now represent in a consumer based, highly technological society.

Krystal Chitwood (2012, T): Berglund 200@3:00 PM

Title: Recreating Jane Austen for a New Generation: A Defense of Seth Grahame-Smith's Pride and Prejudice and Zombies
Major(s): English: Literature
Advisor(s): Beard
Abstract: Pride and Prejudice and Zombies is the classic Jane Austen novel with (a little more than) a dash of zombies, ninjas, katanas, muskets, and martial arts. By taking the renowned and well-loved novel, Seth Grahame-Smith did not seek to offend Janeites, or destroy the novel. He sought to create something new out of something old, a recycling and recreating of a classic to make it more accessible to those who would not necessarily have approached Jane Austen. To accomplish this task Smith plays up the social phenomenon of the zombie, utilizing it in very particular ways to not only liven up the storyline with a modicum of senseless violence, but also to draw particular attention to issues within the original novel, issues such as class and gender. A zombie is not always just a zombie, sometimes it is a way for the Bennet girls to rebel against an oppressive society in more overt ways than Austen herself could have portrayed.

Bryan Cholico (2012, P): Strain Hall 3rd Floor@2:00 PM

Title: The risks and adverse effects associated with antihistamines in treating allergic conjunctivitis
Major(s): Biology
Advisor(s): Schnorr
Abstract: Topical and systemic antihistamines have historically been available over the counter and are used to alleviate and prevent the symptoms caused by allergic conjunctivitis. These eye drops and oral medications reduce swelling, itching and redness in the eyes and provide a fair amount of relief to consumers. Unfortunately, first-generation systemic antihistamines have been shown to produce unwanted side effects involving the brain and central nervous system. These adverse effects include: abnormal sleep/wake cycles, learning difficulties, decreased concentration, and mood effects. First-generation topical antihistamines, however, target the tissue of interest, have minimal side effects and have not been found to cause issues among consumers. Moreover, newer, second-generation antihistamines have been studied and found to exhibit none or few of the former adverse effects. These antihistamines have higher affinities for histamine receptors, are more selective in their mode of action and do not cross the blood-brain barrier as readily as their predecessors, making them safer and more effective. Consequently, this has created some concern about the availability of first-generation antihistamines, causing an advocacy for the restriction of public access to such drugs. Here, I present support for a proposal to remove first-generation oral antihistamines from over-the-counter shelves in the interest of better consumer protection.

Lacey Chong (2011, T): Berglund 232@9:30 AM

Title: "I Don't Know What to Write About": A Self-Study Through the Process of Writing Conferences
Major(s): Education
Advisor(s): Phillips
Abstract: This senior project is a self-study that focused on the teacher talk of teacher-researchers and how it influenced student-writing abilities. The researchers spent seven weeks conducting writing conferences with children in grades one through three. Writing conferences are held to provide children with services in the goal of improving the writing skills for young children, and allowing the sharing of writing with each other. One-to-one conferences were conducted to address the writing needs of each student and to provide strategies to aid them in future writing. Observations, artifacts, and audio recordings were gathered to triangulate data, which enabled the researchers to analyze their own talk and use of the conference time. Field notes were written after every conference. The researchers transcribed each audio recording. The members of this research team served as critical colleagues in analyzing and interpreting data weekly. Two analytic memos were written during the process. This research team identified three main questions: As teacher-researchers, how do we nurture the pre-thinking process of writing, how do we use teacher talk to work with distractions and how do we approach unwelcome student behavior? In their own way the teacher-researchers have come to understand that conducting writing conferences is complex and multi-faceted. Writing conferences as demonstrated through this research is a unique and valuable journey to becoming a teacher.

Sarah Chrusoskie (2008, T): Library Conference@1:00 PM

Title: Breaking The Barriers
Major(s): Art
Advisor(s): Flory


Abstract: Most of my photographs are products of a consumer/ producer relationship. I create images for consumers for their own use. My subjects have been predetermined by the wants and needs of my clients. They trust my artistic judgment to produce something beautiful. Even though I have an assignment to complete, during most shoots I am drawn to people because they are fascinating to watch. A person’s body movements, costume, and attitude can communicate so much without saying a word. However the most expressive element is the face. Even with a blank expression, the eyes tell a story. I find pleasure in the challenge that comes with bending and shaping my photographic style to fit the requirements set down. Though it may seem restricting, I feel I have grown the most as a photographer through fulfilling the needs of a client. Because most customers expect the images in a timely fashion, I have been working with digital medium, although my passion lies in the darkroom. I love the feeling of accomplishment when I have printed an image using my hands, rather than an electronic printer. I feel as if I have created a pure work of art when I process my images from start to finish. For this series, I have combined both the consumer aspect and the artistic nature of my photographs by using digital images that I have taken during events or individual shoots and printed them using darkroom techniques. I have converted the digital images into large-scale negatives and exposed the image onto a glass plate. The glass plates are coated with a light sensitive substance, which allows a photo to appear. The emulsion coating creates a rustic effect with the bubbles and imperfections that appear during processing. This series of portrait images is homage to the struggle between fitting in and non-conformity. Each individual sets up a barrier between him or herself and the rest of the world, whether to blend in or stand out. By printing these faces on glass panes I mean to metaphorically break down the walls, allowing the world to see through any façade we may create for ourselves.

Meghan Chun (2014, T): Marsh 106@9:00 AM

Title: Care Too Much? Empathy, Gender, Culture, and Environmental Identity
Major(s): Psychology
Advisor(s): Burns-Glover
Abstract: Psychologists interested in environmental issues are turning their attention to the personality, gender, and cultural variables that may explain individual and group differences in attitudes towards environmental concerns. In our study, the relationship between an individual's Environmental Identity (EID-Clayton, 2003), gender, and home state Collectivism (Vandello & Cohen, 1999) was tested in a sample of 158 undergraduates (32% male, 61% female, 7% unidentified). How these effects were mediated by trait empathy (Interpersonal Reactivity Index, Davis, 1980) was examined. Contrary to previous research, no gender differences were found in overall EID score (F=.71; p>.05). Consistent with previous research, gender affected subscales scores of the IRI: Women scored higher on Personal Distress (F=7.62; p=.007) and Empathic Concern (F=4.17; p=.043), but the effect sizes were small. To test our hypothesis that culture would affect EID scores, we assigned a state-level score of Collectivism for each respondent to test the influence of provenance on their EID scores. Using this measure, the hypothesis that Collectivism would be positively correlated with EID was not supported. The relationship between Empathy and EID was complex. Our results indicated that EID was only significantly correlated with the subscales of Personal Distress and Empathic Concern. High Personal Distress in situations requiring empathy is negatively related to respondents' scores on Environmental Identity (r = -.144, p < .01). An item analysis of the EID (which has both love for nature and environmental action dimensions) showed that scores on the Personal Distress scale and Empathic Concern scale were most associated with items involving being in nature. Data indicate certain individuals are too distressed by being in nature to take action. Theories of "disgust sensitivity" may explain these results and influence efforts to promote environmental behaviors.

Matt Chun (2014, T): Berglund 230@4:30 PM

Title: International Financial Reporting Standards Adaptation by the United States
Major(s): Business
Advisor(s): Suroviak
Abstract: Over 90 countries have adopted International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS) which does not include the United States. The question is why has the U.S. not adopted IFRS. This can be answered through the analysis of business and foreign business politics that have hindered the convergence process. There are many advantages and disadvantages to converging U.S. GAAP (generally accepted accounting principles) with IFRS. This thesis aims to examine the possible reasons why the U.S. has not adopted IFRS and if it does, what would be the effect on financial reporting in the U.S.

Meghan Chun (2014, T): Berglund 216@1:00 PM

Title: An Evaluation of Pocoyo, a Multimedia Program for Supporting Spanish-Language Acquisition in Preschoolers
Major(s): Education
Advisor(s): Zijdemans Boudreau
Abstract: This study is part of an exploratory research project on the effectiveness of Pocoyo a multimedia product, developed by HITN, that uses iPad games, flash cards, puzzles, story books, and board games to aid in the development of children's native and Spanish language learning. Our project looked particularly at implementing multimedia devices in a preschool learning environment, how teachers can use these devices effectively to support Spanish language acquisition in English-speakers, and the importance of visual and verbal feedback. We were also interested in how the students were interpreting the pictures and word cues shown in the multimedia. The following critical questions guided our research: What are some best practices for using these products to teach native English-speakers Spanish? How effective are the Pocoyo multimedia products for Spanish language learning? Is structured scaffolding versus unstructured learning more effective? What will be the outcome of students learning Spanish from a multimedia device? We did a series of observations at Pacific University's Early Learning Center (ELC) one of the test sites engaged by HNIT. We worked with three focus groups of 4 and 5 year olds over a 12-week period for a total of 8 observations [16 hours]. Data collection was also triangulated through weekly research meetings with our project advisor, and two meetings with the ELC advisor, in the fall and spring semesters. Our research design involved three phases: 1) exploratory; 2) discovery learning; and 3) structured (scaffolded) and unstructured interactions with the tools. Findings will provide feedback to HITN on how to implement their multimedia devices in the classroom and what we learned about Pocoyo's effectiveness as a language program, to help improve and enhance students' ability to improve their literacy and language development.

Isaac Ciula (2007, T): Library Classroom@9:00 AM

Title: Inflation Targeting and the European Union
Major(s): Economics
Advisor(s): Haag
Ruder

Abstract: Since its inception in 1998, the European Central Bank (ECB) has been in charge of establishing and monitoring monetary policy for the European Monetary Union (EMU), which includes the thirteen European nations using the Euro currency. The primary objective of the ECB is to maintain low and stable inflation throughout the EMU. To accomplish this objective the ECB has engaged in inflation targeting. In choosing a target of 2% inflation annually, the ECB aims to stabilize prices throughout the EMU, while at the same time providing each country with the best opportunity to achieve economic growth. Recent research has suggested that inflation targeting is not necessarily the optimal policy approach for the euro area. This research examines the theoretical framework underlying inflation targeting and the resulting trade-offs between price stability and economic growth. I then apply the theoretical framework to the ECB in order to gauge how the price-setting characteristics of European firms and workers have possibly disrupted the underlying goals of monetary policy in the ECB.

Emma Clair (2007, T): Price 214@10:00 AM

Title: The Effects of Practice Distribution When Time is a Limiting Factor
Major(s): Exercise Science
Advisor(s): Jackson


Abstract: Background: Many studies have shown distributed practice to be more beneficial than massed practice in the learning of a motor skill. However, most of these studies have kept the number of practice trials constant, which would in-turn result in a much longer amount of time needed to perform distributed practice. Is the benefit of distributed practice strong enough to withstand the loss of practice when time is kept constant? Purpose: The purpose of the current study is to determine whether or not distributed practice is still more beneficial when time is held constant. Methods: College-aged men and women were recruited to participate. During the first day, participants practiced the Braille Alphabet for a total of sixty minutes under their assigned practice conditions of massed, distributed, or intermediate practice. After practice, participants were tested in short-term retention of what they may have learned. Participants were scored in both accuracy and speed or recognition. Two days later, participants were tested in long-term retention and transfer, consisting of spelling and reading Braille words. Results: Results will be discussed as to the effects of practice distribution when time is a limiting factor.

Faren Clarambeau (2008, T): Berglund 200@1:00 PM

Title: From Spoken Words to Paper and Ink: Oral Narrative Format in Storyteller by Leslie Marmon Silko
Major(s): English: Literature
Advisor(s): Thompson


Abstract: This project explores the genre of Native American literature and oral storytelling. Some of the questions addressed include: What is Native American oral storytelling and what is its purpose? How does it compare to Western print culture? How can Western print culture and Native American oral storytelling be combined? How does Leslie Marmon Silko make this combination meaningful in her book Storyteller, and how does this affect us? The interesting printed formatting of Storyteller will be discussed, and visual examples from this book will be provided to augment the discussion.

Kristin Clark (2007, T): Taylor Auditorium: Marsh 216@11:30 AM

Title: Little Friends, Big Benefits: Facilitation of Social Skills in Kindergarten
Major(s): Psychology
Advisor(s): Burns-Glover


Abstract: The relationship between children's social skills and their ability to form and maintain social networks was explored using a multi-method, multi-measure investigation of kindergartners at a local elementary school. Social skills were measured by multiple observers using a version of a standardized instrument, the Social Skills Checklist (Project Data, University of Washington). Each observer chose two focal children to observe and record for three months in fall 2006 and three months in spring 2007. Behaviors of focal children were recorded during observations on the playground, at lunch and in the classroom. These behaviors included sharing, complimenting, including peers, being able to gain access to a group and sympathizing with others. These friendship patterns were then compared with the measures of social-skills behaviors across a three-month period. The relationship between the Social Skills Checklist (SSC) scores and the sociogram's depiction of friendship was tested by comparing the focal child's level of social competence (on the SSC) with his or her conduct of friendship. Children with high baseline SSC scores appeared to have richer, more complex friendship networks. These results are discussed within the context of emerging research on the importance of social skills in academic competence and school success.

Nicole Clark (2007, T): Marsh 206@8:30 AM

Title: From First Lady to First Madam President: A Campaign Strategy for Hillary Rodham Clinton
Major(s): Politics and Government
Advisor(s): Seward


Abstract: This thesis is a political analysis of the possible candidacy of Senator and former first lady Hillary Rodham Clinton in the next presidential election. Through reviewing feminist literature about the obstacles that women face in running for high offices, the political science literature about the obstacles that any Democratic candidate faces, and the journalistic literature about the obstacles that Hillary Rodham Clinton faces herself, a campaign strategy is developed. The campaign strategy concludes that Clinton herself is the only woman who is a strong enough candidate to overcome the obstacles to becoming the first woman to be elected President.

Hilary Clark (2008, T): Price 202@9:00 AM

Title: Why It May Not Be Your Fault: The Genetic Influences on Obesity
Major(s): Biology
Advisor(s): Sardinia


Abstract: Many different genetic factors have been shown to contribute to obesity; however their levels of influence are still being debated. The biggest debate is whether the person’s environment or genetics is the bigger contributing factor. After looking into the evolution and etiology of obesity in humans, I will explore some of the research investigating the role of familial relationships and familial environment on obesity. I will also examine specific genes that have been implicated in metabolic syndrome, insulin resistance, and inflammation. Finally, I will look at the effects of antiobesity agents.

Jessica Clark (2012, T): Berglund 232@11:30 AM

Title: Nature Exploration in the Early Learning Community
Major(s): Education
Advisor(s): Phillips
Abstract: This project explores how children ages 3-6 in a pre-school/kindergarten setting are excited to learn about nature through indoor and outdoor play. Data collected includes written observations and pictures of children at work and play in different classroom settings, records of informal interactions with children, and anecdotal records of meetings with colleagues and classroom teachers. Two four-week periods of data collection occurred, with on-going analysis after each period. Data was organized and analyzed according to emerging themes of teacher talk, structured/unstructured physical learning, and literacy. It was found that indoor and outdoor play served as a medium by which the children made connections between academic content and their lives outside of school.

Allison Clark (2013, P): Strain Hall 2nd Floor@11:00 AM

Title: Identifying Parabens in Personal Care Products
Major(s): Chemistry
Advisor(s): Bregel
Abstract: General chemistry students at the end of CHEM 230 are required to perform a group laboratory experiment that incorporates techniques they have learned throughout the year. They accomplish this by choosing a project from the ones offered and developing an experimental question they would like to answer. This research is looking into developing a new general chemistry final project focused on detecting parabens in personal care products. Parabens are widely used in personal care products such as cosmetics, shampoo, and lotions to increase shelf life. Their use is controversial because several studies have shown that after just one topical application they can be absorbed into the skin and they have even been correlated to breast cancer. The proposed experiment starts with an extraction to isolate the parabens from the personal care product. These samples will then be analysed by thin layer chromatography and gas chromatography mass spectroscopy.

Jessica Clark (2013, T): Price 214@8:30 AM

Title: Cannabinoids as Potential Treatments in Breast Cancer
Major(s): Biology
Advisor(s): Baugher
Abstract: Breast cancer affects approximately 1 in 8 women during their lifetime, and is treated by numerous therapies that result in diverse outcomes. Cannabinoids are a class of chemical compounds that have potential novel applications as anti-tumoral drugs to treat breast cancer. These compounds are known to activate cannabinoid receptors 1 and 2, found on the surface of many types of mammalian cells. Cannabinoid receptors are commonly expressed on tumor cells, and therefore can be potential therapeutic targets. Recent studies show that cannabinoid receptor signaling can activate the P13K/Akt pathway, leading to cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in transformed cells. There is also potential 'cross-talk' between the P13K/Akt pathway and the Ras/Raf/Map pathway. This cross-talk suggests that use of cannabinoids are able to stimulate cooperative anti-tumoral actions by use of more than one pathway. Interestingly, cannabinoid anti-proliferation action is not seen in non-transformed cells. The aim of this study is to investigate the potential of cannabinoids and cannabinoid receptors as novel breast cancer therapeutics.

Molly Clasen (2011, T): Berglund 200@9:30 AM

Title: Carnival of Words: Applying Bakhtin to Spoken Word Poetry
Major(s): English: Literature
Advisor(s): Pagan
Abstract: Prejudice against the Spoken Word Poetry movement reveals deeper assumptions about literary value and the political function of art. In my thesis, I deconstruct these prejudices and compare Spoken Word Poetry events to the medieval carnival, drawing from Mikhail Bakhtin's theory of the Carnivalesque and an interview with two-time National Poetry Slam winner, Anis Mojgani. I ague that Spoken Word Poetry is creating a cultural space in America where one can challenge power structures and transgress socially constructed categories of identity. Emphasizing Spoken Word's audience empowerment, celebration of minorities, re-imagining of the body, communal atmosphere, and ephemeral nature, I explain how Spoken Word Poetry is a rebellious act in both form and content. I conclude that during this politically and economically divided time in American history, Spoken Word Poetry satisfies many Americans' need for self-expression and allows people to transcend social hierarchies.

Madalyn Clemence (2009, T): Library Conference@10:00 AM

Title: Just When Everything Was Going Well ?. SOMEONE HID THE 8-BALL
Major(s): Theatre
Advisor(s): Margolis
Abstract: Directing Stop Kiss by Diana Son was both very challenging and very rewarding for me. I first read Stop Kiss in May of 2008 and knew right away that the play was special but also knew how difficult it would be. The subject matter, size of cast, transitions, set requirements, and costume changes all jumped out as challenges I would have to face. It took me three months to settle on doing the play because I was intimidated by the number of variables. However, it turns out I was doing the very same thing that the script is addressing: swerving around something that seemed difficult. Upon recognizing this irony, I immediately stepped up to the challenge. The rehearsal process was one full of success, 8-balls, heartache, and 90’s music. My presentation will guide you through all of the swerves, straddles, and brakes of the production and, most importantly, I will finally reveal what was so important about the 8-ball.

Madalyn Clemence (2009, T): Berglund 200@2:00 PM

Title: Love According to Disney versus Love According to Harry Potter: A Close Analysis of how Love Relates to Good and Evil in the Harry Potter Series
Major(s): English: Literature
Advisor(s): Beard
Abstract: Most of us have grown up watching Disney movies and reading children’s stories where love conquers all and love is always on the side of good. However, one children’s series with recent overwhelming popularity presents a world where love is independent of good and evil. In the Harry Potter series J.K. Rowling creates this kind of world, and characters living within that magical world who make choices solely based on love; however the consequences that result from those choices are not always positive. This more realistic representation of the relationship of love to good and evil in a series of books as popular as the Harry Potter texts could have far reaching effects on how children grow up learning about this relationship. My thesis explores such topics giving a close reading analysis of the meaning of love in Harry Potter and how it is represented by Narcissa Malfoy and Lily Potter.

Alexa Clement (2008, T): Price 204@4:00 PM

Title: Project Pesticide: Urban Pesticide Use within the Lower Willamette Watershed and Effects on Local Salmon
Major(s): Environmental Science
Advisor(s): Gundersen


Abstract: Pesticides used primarily for lawn and garden care have been on the increase in urban areas. The pesticide run-off that results from lawn application enters our stream systems and poses a severe problem to the safety of local salmon. The EPA created a law that makes it mandatory to inform the customers of the harmful effects of many of these products. The chemicals involved are: 2,4-D, carbaryl, diazinon, diuron, malathion, triclopyr BEE, and trifluralin. I performed a random survey of businesses within the lower Willamette watershed to determine whether these laws are being followed. The results showed that policies are not being followed, and consumers are not being made aware of the risks posed by the use of these pesticides. Laws and regulations currently do not seem to be a viable solution, but changing our reliance on chemical-intensive management of lawns and gardens could be. The use of sustainable, organic gardening methods is not only beneficial to aquatic life but also fruitful to the gardener.

Kennedy Clifford (2009, T): Marsh 106@1:00 PM

Title: ?Our Turn Now?: Harold Washington and African American Electoral Politics in the 1980s
Major(s): History
Advisor(s): Szefel
Abstract: Barack Obama's ascendancy to the presidency owes much to changes instituted in Chicago's African American political community a generation earlier. Harold Washington helped transform the civil rights movement of the 1960s into an effective electoral political system in the 1970s. This paper details the change from organized marches, sit-ins, and protests in the streets to organized voter registration drives, rising African American voter turnout, and subsequently African Americans as major players in American politics. In the 1980s blacks realized they needed to elect their own representative in order to effect major change, and escape from the too often empty promises of white politicians. This new strategy developed largely during the Reagan years as hard-won civil rights era gains became subject to repeal. Washington was able to successfully defeat the infamous Daley Machine because of the enormous amount of black community support that rose up around him, which included massive voter registration drives. Washington’s election to Mayor of Chicago helped to transform racial politics and clear the way for an African American President.

Alexa Clifford (2011, T): Taylor Auditorium: Marsh 216@11:30 AM

Title: Deadly Sins
Major(s): Media Arts: Film and Video Production
Advisor(s): Hardacker
Vaisburd
Abstract: Deadly Sins is an experimental narrative based on the Seven Deadly Sins. The film revolves around four main characters, each of them embodying at least one of the sins, as two different relationships collide. Since there is no dialogue in my film, the embodiment of the portrayed sins is conveyed through the actions of the characters, and the color present in the scene (as each of the Deadly Sins has it's own color that represents it). The inspiration for this film came from my interest in the Sins, and how they have influenced people. I took my understanding of the experimental and narrative genres and combined them to write, shoot, and edit my capstone into an unconventional storytelling of how I feel these sins would interact with each other if they were personified. With my interest in editing, I have crafted my film into a piece that I hope to be visually stunning and represent the techniques and skills I have learned through my educational experience.

Amber Coates (2013, T): Strain 121@8:30 AM

Title: The Bed Bug Show: Who's your daddy?
Major(s): Biology
Advisor(s): Schnorr
Abstract: Examination of polymorphic bed bug DNA indicates a close genetic relationship among individuals during a two-year sporadic infestation. Since 2010, Pacific University has been working to rid a single dormitory of repeated bed bug infestations. The university has worked diligently to rid the dorm of the pesky bugs using high heat treatments and education of students about how infestations are spread. The treatments appeared to be effective with no bug detection by people or trained canines for a period of time. However, after ~ 4-6 months, new bug sightings and student complaints began, indicating a new infestation inside the dormitory. Here we analyze the genetics of the populations using 24 microsatellite markers and mitochondria DNA sequencing to compare specific alleles between individuals from different infestation occurrences. The microsatellite analysis suggests a high probability of all bugs sharing a common lineage. Moreover, the mitochondrial DNA sequencing that is currently in progress supports these findings. Overall, the results suggest that current bed bug treatments are successful in reducing the population, but they may not be fully eradicating the problem.

Eric Coats (2011, T): Price 203@1:30 PM

Title: Quenching quantum dot fluorescence with methyl viologen
Major(s): Chemistry
Advisor(s): Cordes
Abstract: Fluorescent nanoparticles known as quantum dots have been studied extensively in recent years. Quantum dots have a wide array of applications, ranging from electronics to dyes and pigments. One active area of quantum dot research is to use them in fluorescent chemical sensing systems. When using quantum dots in sensors it is important to understand how binding events at the surface affect the fluorescence of the quantum dots. This research project has focused on understanding the fluorescence quenching observed when various quantum dots are treated with methyl viologen, a well-known fluorescence quencher. Methyl viologen was used to quench CdTe/ZnS quantum dots modified with surface groups such as carboxylic acids, amines, boronic acids, or alcohol ligands. The results are quantified through determination of fluorescence quenching constants. Understanding how these quantum dots are quenched provides information as to how binding events affect the fluorescence of the system.

Aaron Cochrane (2013, T): CLIC@3:30 PM

Title: Chocolate Milk, Brown Cows: Alienation and Integration of Farmers Within Contemporary Society.
Major(s): Anthropology/Sociology
Advisor(s): Mahar
Greer
Abstract: This paper explores what it means to be a farmer in today's world. Agriculture has fed the majority of people throughout history and, by continually becoming more labor-efficient, has provided the ability for an ever-increasing diversification and specialization of labor in non-agricultural industries. Even as societies have become increasingly complex, the role of agriculture as necessary for sustenance has not changed. Farmers in developed countries today have a unique experience as occupying a dual place as both fundamental and antiquated in relation to the rest of their society. This study explores these farmers' experiences and identity through autoethnographic immersion as well as interviews done over a two-month period in the summer of 2012. Specifically, life histories and current views on agriculture and society were used to develop an idea of how self-concept is constructed based on various contradictory roles, such as the two mentioned above. This study joins a host of multidisciplinary rural studies research that has informed our perspective on agriculture, but it points to a need for more research on the differences, similarities and interactions between rural and urban culture in developed nations.

Aaron Cochrane (2014, T): Marsh 106@10:00 AM

Title: Using Our Words: Emotion, Belonging, and First Year Students' Outcomes
Major(s): Psychology
Advisor(s): Burns-Glover
Abstract: A growing body of research indicates that "non-cognitive" factors may prove to be better predictors for first year college student success than traditional academic measures. As part of a larger analysis of students' performance in a first year seminar [FYS], respondents (N=88) from five demographically and academically representative sections of [FYS] completed a series of surveys during their first semester. We coded open-ended responses using Linguistic Inquiry and Word Count software to assess the rate of words in positive (M=51), negative (M=5.29), social (M=37.29), and cognitive (M=87.79) categories. We hypothesized that these responses gathered at the beginning of the course would predict later variations in students' grades and sense of belonging at the university, such that those with higher positive and social word scores would have higher grades and score higher on a Sense of Belonging[SOB] scale administered at the end of the semester. Regression analyses were conducted to see if respondents' scores on each of the four word categories predicted their scores on each SOB subscale as well as each respondent's final semester grade. Results indicated that cognitive word use is significantly related to students' rating of their university belonging when controlling for perceived pedagogical caring (r=.21; p=.048) and that social word predicted 6.7% of variance in cumulative GPA (R2=.067, F(1,81)=5.79, p=.018). These results indicate that analyzing incoming students' written goals using LIWC sheds light on their incoming affect as a variable that influences belonging and academic success at a university.

Sean Cohen (2010, T): Marsh 101@8:30 AM

Title: Psychology Of Sustainability: Student Attitudes, Beliefs And Behaviors
Major(s): Psychology
Advisor(s): Burns-Glover
Abstract: An increasing body of psychological research indicates that a person’s own environmental behaviors are linked to their beliefs and attitudes. Attitude theory predicts that those high on “new paradigm” environmental attitudes should also be more likely to engage in sustainability-related behaviors. A convenience sample survey (N=177) with items from the New Ecological Paradigm Scale and a list of sustainable behaviors was conducted. High NEP scores were positively correlated with some of the sustainable behaviors: recycling printer toner, paper, and plastic bottles. Scores were correlated with interest in travel courses to other cultures to study their environmental practices (80.5%) and Service-learning courses to work in local communities on environmental projects (76.5%). This study supports the Theory of Planned Behavior and the attitude-behavior links between environmental worldview and engaging in sustainable behaviors.

Zachariah Cohen (2013, T): Marsh 101@10:00 AM

Title: Punishment, Rehabilitation, and Legalization in the Media: Coverage of Methamphetamine and the War on Drugs 1980-2012
Major(s): Politics and Government
Advisor(s): Van Dyk
Abstract: The news media play a vital role in shaping public opinion and thus attract scholarly attention. This story examines the frames used in local and national news stories since 1985 about public policy and methamphetamine to examine whether the media reflected policies related to punishment, rehabilitation, or legalization In recent years, as methamphetamine in the United States has exploded, so too has the drug war in Mexico become increasingly deadly, spilling across the US-Mexico border and feeding into the larger "war on drugs" in the United States. The study found five dominant frames: criminalization, legalization, decriminalization, community destruction, and international trafficking. The use of these frames, along with information gathered through an indexing analysis of sources quoted, found different policy interpretations by the newspaper media in different regions of the United States. The information gathered showed trends in the criminalization and the international trafficking frames that reflected the policies made by Elected officials that are implemented by enforcement agents; the most common source indexed were these agencies of government.

Zachariah Cohen (2014, T): Berglund 145@1:30 PM

Title: Natural Gas Fracturing in the Marcellus Shale Region: The media on environmental issues in regional politics
Major(s): Environmental Studies
Advisor(s): Van Dyk
Abstract: Natural gas fracturing has soared around the world, especially in the Marcellus Shale region of the Northeast. The boom spurred controversy about the environmental and economic effects of gas extraction through "fracking." The print media play a critical role in shaping the public understanding of issues, so this study examines the news coverage of fracking. The study explores whether different geographic regions cover fracking differently. To do this I used 746 articles from 13 newspapers, big and small throughout the region. The newspapers articles show a bulk use of industry and government agents to support industry and highlight the effects of the wastewater. This project will explain may consequences and reactions to the natural gas boom that the United States are experiencing and the way that individual communities, counties and cities push and pull the overall conversation.

Katrina Cole (2008, T): McGill Auditorium@9:00 AM

Title: Go-Go Pod: Liberate Yourself
Major(s): Media Arts
Advisor(s): Geraci


Abstract: Guide books have become an essential companion on our excursions to destinations of which we are unfamiliar. These books are informative, fun and designed to save us time and money while we are in unaccustomed territory. For the most part however, they are also heavy and immediately flag us as tourists the moment we refer to them in public spaces. By aggregating vital travel information into a format that can be accessed through an iPod, the traveler’s load is lightened, and a larger degree of anonymity is granted. Furthermore, the iPod platform allows for more sophisticated information, such as audio and video to be conveyed, yet another clear advantage over traditional guide books. For my senior project, I will present the Go-Go Pod website, where two iPod-compatible multimedia travel books will be available for download. Books are heavy, liberate yourself.

Abigail Coleman (2010, T): Price 202@9:00 AM

Title: Effect Of Post-High School Transition Information On The Self-Efficacy Of Parents Of Children With Intellectual Disabilities
Major(s): Exercise Science
Advisor(s): Concepcion
Abstract: The last few years of high school for a parent of a student with a disability can be a confusing and often extremely difficult time (Migliore, Grossi, Mank, & Rogan, 2008). There are many services available to parents who have children with disabilities, but many times, these services go unnoticed. This research study looks at the needs of parents who have children ages 14 to 21 with intellectual disabilities and how much they know about services available to them. A brochure containing important aspects of the time of transition out of high school into the adult life was put together. Participants were asked to rate their level of self-efficacy in a variety of categories pertaining to transition of their child out of high school and to read the transition brochure. After reading the brochure, parents were asked to rate again their level of self-efficacy.

Alesha Coleman (2010, T): Berglund 232@4:00 PM

Title: City of Cornelius Rebranding Project ? The Survey
Major(s): Business Administration
Advisor(s): Griffie
Abstract: We worked with city planners for the city of Cornelius to kick start their re-branding efforts. We developed and distributed surveys that catered to what we found to be a diverse community of residents and business owners throughout Cornelius who are invested in the future of the city. The focus of the survey was to gain an understanding of the current public perception about the city and how they envision future progress. We aimed to produce sound, reflective data with the intention to help the city planners go forth in the process where they will decide the direction of the city.

Alexander Collias (2012, T): Marsh 206@2:30 PM

Title: The Lady in the Sky: Investigating a Lyrical Metaphor in the Music of Jimi Hendrix
Major(s): Psychology
Advisor(s): Schultz
Abstract: This psychobiography investigates the life and music of Jimi Hendrix. A major mystery in Hendrix's work involves the question of why he included female figures in the sky so often in his lyrical content. To explore possible answers, Hendrix's life and music are analyzed using script theory and attachment theory. Several of Hendrix's most prominent songs are discussed in terms of script theory to extract an overall story structure. Then Hendrix's life history is examined through attachment theory to examine his relationship dynamics. Several important life events are also investigated. The explanation for the mystery of the "woman in the sky" is reached by synthesizing all supporting interpretations.

Steven Collins (2007, T): Library Conference@10:30 AM

Title: Effects of Staring vs. Intent to Influence on the Sense of Being Stared At
Major(s): Psychology
Advisor(s): Schultz


Abstract: Much research in the past 10 years has investigated what one author (Sheldrake) calls the "sense of being stared at" from behind. Results generally have been reported to be positive"that is, participants overall do perform at a better than chance level when asked to guess whether they are or are not being stared at from behind. At the same time, criticisms of the effect have been made, some going so far as to question the effect's validity. The present study attempts to address various criticisms of previous designs by relying on physiological measures of awareness of staring. Moreover, conditions are created in which staring is contrasted with thinking hard about influencing a participant in the absence of staring. Results are reported and discussed in detail.

Jen Collins (2011, T): Price 214@9:30 AM

Title: Effects of using antibody to target the cytotoxic calicheamicin to MUC1 and LeY+ antigens on breast cancer cells
Major(s): Biology
Advisor(s): Schnorr
Abstract: Purpose: CTM01 is an antibody conjugated to calicheamicin that recognizes the antigen MUC1 that is expressed by breast cancer cells. Hu3S193 is also an antibody conjugated to calicheamicin that recognizes the antigen LeY+ that is also expressed by breast cancer cells. My proposed study will be to evaluate the combination of CTM01 and Hu3S193 together to see if more breast cancer cells will be inhibited verses just one antibody. Proposed Experimental Design: Breast cancer cells were grown in dishes and tested with different concentrations of each antibody, CTM01 and hu3S193 and CTM01 and hu3S103 together. Cells numbers were recorded every other day for 50 days. Nude mice were injected with carcinogenic breast cells. Tumors were given 4 days to grow before mice received treatment similar to the treatment given to cells in the dishes. Tumors from mice were weighed every 10 days for 50 days. Results: Breast cells treated with an antibody showed carcinogenic cell inhibition. Cells treated with both antibodies and calicheamicin increased cell inhibition the most. Higher concentrations of antibodies increases the number of cells inhibited. Mice tumors decreased over the 50 day time period when an antibody and calicheamicin were given. Mice treated with both CTM01 and hu3S193 had the greatest decrease in tumor volume. My purpose of combining both CTM01 and hu3S193 was effective at inhibiting the most carcinogenic cells.

Madison Collura (2014, T): Marsh 206@9:00 AM

Title: Reducing Eating Disorders Through an Intervention Based on the Social Ecological Model in Female Students at Forest Grove High School
Major(s): Public Health
Advisor(s): Peterson-Besse
Abstract: It is estimated that 14% of the adolescent population is currently suffering from an eating disorder. Eating disorders in young adolescent women is a serious problem that affects females across the country. This Capstone project proposes an intervention based on the Social Ecological Model to be implemented at Forest Grove High School through the resources of the Forest Grove School Based Health Center located on the campus. This intervention targets multiple factors that contribute to eating disorders, including family, teacher, and peer influences on food habits and body image. This intervention will focus both on primary and secondary prevention factors and will include seminars put on by School Based Health Center staff targeted to parents about eating role models and seminars for teachers and staff members to recognize early warning signs, symptoms, and providing the right information. In addition, there will be a media component of the intervention targeted at students in the high school to reduce teasing and increase self-esteem. The school based health center will be able to sustain the program over the years by its own resources and staff members. Evaluation procedures will be discussed, including surveys conducted one year after implementation to examine program effectiveness.

Sarah Conkey (2009, T): Taylor Auditorium: Marsh 216@8:30 AM

Title: People as They Are
Major(s): Art
Advisor(s): Flory
Abstract: Photography is an art form that can capture people as they truly are, when they think no one is looking. People, who are doing everyday things that often go unnoticed are captured and printed in black and white to create a sense of wonder about who they are and what they are thinking.

Sarah Conkey (2009, T): McGill Auditorium@3:30 PM

Title: Edina Hardware: ?We speak fluent doohicky and what-cha-ma-call-it?
Major(s): Media Arts: Integrated Media
Advisor(s): Geraci
Abstract: I designed and created the web site for Edina Hardware in Edina Minnesota. This website gives a small, old-fashioned, stocked to the ceiling, neighborhood hardware store a face on the web. Edina Hardware now has an identity online to increase business and compete with the big name stores, while keeping its character and personal charm. In my presentation, I will discuss the processes I used in planning, designing and implementing the sitePhotography is an art form that can capture people as they truly are, when they think no one is looking. People, who are doing everyday things that often go unnoticed are captured and printed in black and white to create a sense of wonder about who they are and what they are thinking.

Jennifer Conner (2010, T): Marsh 206@3:30 PM

Title: No Correspondent Left Behind: Media Analysis of the No Child Left Behind Act
Major(s): Politics and Government
Advisor(s): Boykoff
Moore
Abstract: The No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 was a sweeping piece of federal education policy reform. Lawmakers have historically opposed such changes, evidenced by toothless reforms and legislation following the Elementary and Secondary Education Act in 1965. As a key domestic policy issue, education receives coverage on a national and local scale. An analysis of print articles by The New York Times, the Oregonian, and The Star Tribune (Minneapolis) and television transcripts from abc, cbs, and nbc revealed three categories of frames: the political aspects of the law, the educational merit of the law, and finally, the revolt against the law’s consequences. Specifically, political frames highlighted the concept of accountability or partisan bickering. Education frames focused on the standards and testing process and results, and the revolt frames examined the subsequent consequences. A source analysis also indicates a correlation between the frames and the identity of the source.

Jennifer Conner (2010, T): McGill Auditorium@10:00 AM

Title: The Real Political Elite: Journalism?s Aversion To Evolving News Media
Major(s): Media Arts: Journalism
Advisor(s): Cassady
Abstract: Journalism’s ability to inform and influence the public and everyday affairs rests in its credibility and reliability. In order to ensure both of those qualities, journalism created a foundation in schools and ethical codes to which journalists could adhere. But the emergence of new technologies changed the environment of traditional newsgathering and reporting. With Internet and access to public officials and records, citizen journalists and bloggers now find themselves at the forefront of the news. Although their effect is primarily local, these new “journalists” are consistently rejected as unreliable and damaging to the reputation of journalism. This tension, unlikely to be addressed by the journalism community, will soon create legal and political problems as blogs and online news media conflict with traditional journalistic codes, ethics, and laws. However, it is essential to avoid too many laws on the issue, as to avoid limiting the press’ capacity as a governmental watchdog.

Emily Constantin (2010, T): CLIC@9:00 AM

Title: The Muslim Mother in Contemporary American Culture and her Role in the Family
Major(s): Anthropology
Advisor(s): Mahar
Abstract: This is an ethnographic research project designed to investigate and shed light upon hardships that Muslim American mothers face while trying to establish a strong family bond in the home and raising “Mu'Miniyn children”. Mu'Miniyn is the term used to define true believers of Islam.

Alejandro Contreras (2012, T): Price 202@1:00 PM

Title: Effects of Inspiratory Muscle Training on Elite Adolescent Swimmers
Major(s): Exercise Science
Advisor(s): Henry
Abstract: Inspiratory muscle training (IMT) has been shown to increase pulmonary function in children and adults having chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases and, to a lesser extent, in healthy adults. It is also suggested that IMT may improve pulmonary performance in healthy athletes in a variety of sports; however, the ability of IMT to enhance pulmonary performance in healthy elite swimmers is less clear. Purpose: The purpose of this study is to assess the effects of ten-week IMT on pulmonary function in elite adolescent swimmers. Methods: Twenty elite-level, competitive swimmers, between the ages of 13-18 yrs, are completing a ten week experimental study. Dependent measures, including maximal inspiratory pressure (MIP), maximal voluntary ventilation (MVV), forced vital capacity (FVC), forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1.0), residual volume (RV), and total lung capacity (TLC), were pre-tested. Similarly, breathlessness post-exercise was measured via self-report using Borg's Modified Dyspnea scale (1-10). After familiarization and pre-testing, participants were randomly assigned to experimental (EXP) or control (CONT) group. Participants in the EXP group are currently completing IMT training, including 30 inspirations (applying IMT device), twice per day, five days per week, for ten consecutive weeks. The CONT group is not receiving IMT. At the completion of ten weeks, both control group and experimental group participants will complete post-testing, identical to pre-testing. Two-way ANOVA will be utilized to test pretest/posttest main effect, EXP/CONT main effect, and possible interactions. Results & Conclusion: To be presented on Senior Projects Day (study is currently in-process).

Marshall Cook (2009, T): Marsh 106@10:00 AM

Title: Narrating the Sioux Uprising of 1862: Lincoln and the Flow of Information
Major(s): History
Advisor(s): Lipin
Abstract: In 1862 during the Civil War, there was a violent uprising in Minnesota by the Sioux who lived there. Long oppressed, the Lakota Sioux living on reservations devoid of timely government rations and assistance waged war on the whites of the area. When the uprising was put down, 303 of these warriors that took place in it were sentenced to death by a military court. Upon hearing this news president Lincoln personally looked over every case one by one to determine those who actually deserved to face the gallows. My presentation will focus on the information Lincoln received pertaining to the condemned, and how he dealt with it. He heard both advocates and harsh critics of the Indians as well as testimony from men and women of all classes of society. I will examine the extremely contrasting stories he heard about this uprising, how he probably dealt with them, and ultimately, how we can judge his decision to commute the sentences of all but about 30 of those sentenced to hang.

Nathan Cook (2009, T): Marsh 101@11:00 AM

Title: Sports & Academics
Major(s): Psychology
Advisor(s): Kleinknecht
Abstract: In recent years, a debate has raged regarding the role of physical activity in the school day: does it take up time that could be better spent on academic tasks? Should limits be placed on extra curricular activities that might interfere with homework? In short, the question the debate centers on is whether physical activity is related to school achievement. Some schools have gone so far as to completely remove physical activities from their curriculum; indeed, in the state of Georgia, new schools are built without playgrounds. The purpose of this presentation is to address the question of the relationship between physical activity and school achievement by synthesizing the empirical literature. Though more empirical work needs to be done to fully understand the link between physical activity and cognitive performance, research to date does imply that children should be given ample time to engage in vigorous activity. This presentation will review the research to date and conclude with suggestions for the direction of future research.

Evan Cooper (2013, T): Strain 121@11:00 AM

Title: College Football Ranking Systems: Improvements of Two Models
Major(s): Mathematics
Advisor(s): Boardman
Abstract: Over the years, the Bowl Championship Series has been widely criticized. Many fans felt that their teams were poorly represented in the rankings and thus left out of more prestigious postseason games. As a result of this dissatisfaction, the NCAA is changing the way the national champion in Division I college football will be determined. Starting in the 2013-14 season, the national champion will be the winner of a four team, two-round playoff. A committee of experts, presumably using a ranking system, will select the teams to participate in the playoff. In this talk we explore two existing mathematical models that can be used to rank college football teams. We discuss methods that improve the accuracies of these models including the use of Diophantine equations in weighting margin of victory and using least squares regression to determine parameters involved in predicting the margin of victory of a game.

Jennifer Renee Cooper Munoz (2011, T): Berglund 200@1:00 PM

Title: Theatre and AIDS: The Magic Behind the Mayhem
Major(s): English: Literature
Advisor(s): Margolis
Beard
Abstract: During the 1980's, gay communities across the United States were being ravaged by a disease that neither the media nor political agents were willing to discuss. As months and years passed, thousands of people were dying, even more were getting sick, and yet no answers were given. After campaigning, organizing, and protesting led to only small goals being accomplished, Larry Kramer, activist and playwright, took the plight of AIDS to the theatre. This initial theatrical movement would provide the momentum for the education of this epidemic to thrive. Kramer's play The Normal Heart, which is now classified as a "First Generation" AIDS play, served two purposes: to teach communities, gay and straight, about AIDS while, simultaneously, teaching the straight community about the gay community. Tony Kushner, a decade later, would write the most prominent "Second Generation" AIDS play: Angels in America. Kushner magically weaves the reality of the human experience with the surreal. Examining the fear of AIDS as a modern day plague that permeates these plays, I will show the theatrical evolution that began with screaming, proceeded with dreaming, and ended with dying.

Cora Copelin (2009, T): Marsh 106@9:00 AM

Title: A Crisis of Faith: The Western Schism and its Effect on the Lay Piety Movement
Major(s): History
Advisor(s): Rampton
Abstract: This paper explores the connection between the spread of religiosity and piety among the common people of the late Middle Ages and the Great Schism in the Catholic Church that resulted in two popes reigning at the same time: one in Avignon, France and one in Rome. The lay piety movement began prior to the Great Schism, but as a direct result of the split in the papacy, the popular movement spread faster and wider than it had in previous decades. Evidence of this movement can be seen in the growth of religious communities, the influence of popular figures who worked outside of the Church's hierarchy, and the printing and translations of private faith guides and Bibles."

Mary Corey (2014, T): McGill Auditorium@9:30 AM

Title: Value of Local Wetlands and the Need for their Restoration
Major(s): Environmental Studies
Advisor(s): Van Buskirk
Abstract: Over the last 200 years, 53 percent of America's wetlands have been lost due to agricultural spread or seriously degraded due to the initiation of invasive species. Invasive species negatively affect wetland function by decreasing the diversity that assemblages of native plants provide when simpler combinations of productive generalists replace them. My project was to design a viable native plant community for Dabblers Marsh at Fernhill Wetlands that could reclaim an area currently occupied by invasives. Dabblers Marsh is a water catchment dominated by reed canary grass (Phalaris arundinacea), a persistent invasive species. By implementing a combination of mechanical removal and herbicides to significantly reduce reed canary grass and subsequently revegetating with natives, the site will be restored to one that is dominated by natives. My interest in doing this project is to provide a baseline of information that will benefit others working on future projects in similar ecosystems and to support the utilization of natural systems as a means of filtering water and promoting habitat health. This project developed through an internship with Clean Water Services (CWS). CWS is a water management utility committed to protecting water resources in the Tualatin River Watershed. CWS is a forerunner in utilizing constructed wetlands to filter and cool water in conjunction with traditional filtration facilities. They clean an average of 58 million gallons of water a day. The need for clean water is expected to double in the next 45 years in the Willamette Valley. Utilizing wetlands for the filtering and cooling of water is a cost effective way to approach the additional 50,000 acre-feet of water per year this will require. Loss/degradation of wetlands has severe repercussions resulting in the depletion of wildlife and waterfowl habitat, inadequate filtration of groundwater, and inappreciable flood control. By restoring degraded wetlands habitat for animals and waterfowl is expanded, invasive species are reduced, and more natural and sustainable methods of water filtration are achieved.

Jessica Cornwell (2010, T): Berglund 200@10:00 AM

Title: Not Just a Pretty Place: Landscape in Short Fiction
Major(s): English: Creative Writing
Advisor(s): Lang
Pagan
Abstract: Landscape is an element often overlooked in writing, no matter the genre. In my presentation, I will illuminate the necessity of landscape in writing, and highlight examples from three key authors: Charles de Lint, Ray Bradbury, and Jack London. Though we don't often think about landscape in writing while reading our favorite book or an essay, it is important to know that landscape is not just the world around the setting. It is the connections, the personal histories and sentiments that influence what the text looks like to us. I will also share several craft examples that demonstrate this.

Rowen Coronel (2012, P): Price 1st Floor Hallway@10:00 AM

Title: An Analysis of Teacher Behaviors and Student Perceptions in Physical Education
Major(s): Exercise Science
Advisor(s): Alstot
Abstract: Veal and Anderson (2009) stated that different teaching methods and the manner of interaction with students can shape the character and the quality of the educational process. Similarly, Koka and Hein (2005) found that positive teacher behaviors, such as appropriate feedback statements, are strong predictors of students' intrinsic motivation in physical education. Stronger intrinsic motivation can often lead to an overall better success in the class as well as an increased likelihood of living a physically active lifestyle. Because psychological factors (e.g. perception, intrinsic motivation) are so important to the well-being of individuals, it is important to determine variables that are related to these psychological factors. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between teachers' behaviors while instructing physical activity classes and students' perceptions of the teacher and the physical activity in a physical education setting. Method: Several physical education classes will be video recorded. Videos will then be observed; teachers' behaviors will be analyzed using Veal and Anderson's (2009) systematic observation system for coding teacher function in physical education, which codes teachers' behaviors into six different categories of behavior. Students' perceptions will be obtained using the Physical Education Learning Environment Scale (PELES), a 24-item questionnaire used to measure perceived learning environment. Data Analysis: Pearson's r will be used to analyze the relationships between student perceptions, as measured by their scores on the PELES questionnaire, and teachers' behaviors. Results & Conclusions: Will be discussed on Senior Projects Day.

Kristen Chayrese Corrales (2013, T): Price 1st Floor Hallway@1:00 PM

Title: Dietary protein and lean muscle gain: A meta-analytic review
Major(s): Exercise Science
Advisor(s): Faulk
Abstract: Higher dietary protein, both from natural (e.g., meat) or supplemental (e.g., powders) sources, has been shown to effectively increase lean muscle mass. Because of their availability and ease of use, protein supplements might serve as a favored form of protein to gain lean muscle mass; however, little is known about how natural and supplemental proteins compare in their influence on lean muscle mass gain. Purpose: To perform a meta-analysis based on existing published research literature to (1) determine the existence, direction, and magnitude of the association between dietary protein and lean muscle gain; and (2) identify other study and/or sample characteristics that may influence the association between dietary protein and lean muscle gain. Methods: Studies were selected based on Internet searches of journal databases. Forty-six studies were analyzed using a random effects model. Analysis: Standardized measures of the effect of dietary protein on lean muscle gain were calculated for each study and then synthesized into a single effect size using Comprehensive Meta-Analysis software. Results: The overall effect of dietary protein on lean muscle gain was moderate (d = .407), but the test of heterogeneity suggested that the results of studies were variable. Moderation analyses found natural protein (d = .709) resulted in greater gains in lean muscle mass than supplements (d = -.004). In addition, exercise, gender, length of dietary intervention, and amount of protein were all found to moderate the relationship between dietary protein and lean muscle gain.

Gabriel Corwin (2014, T): Price 214@10:00 AM

Title: A Stern Disdain: On the Intellectual Arguments of Anti-Bank Advocates During the Bank War
Major(s): History
Advisor(s): Lipin
Abstract: This thesis examines the intellectual arguments voiced against banking and paper currency in the early half of the 19th century of the United States. Banking and paper money conflicted with many enlightenment ideals, especially the idea that all value was derived from labor. This led to a very strong backlash against paper money, despite its essential role in the expansion of the economy in the United States. These arguments were voiced in newspapers and in widely circulating books, that all shared a language centered on a worldview grounded in the thinking of John Locke and Adam Smith. To explore these cultural anxieties and the ideological roots of them, this thesis utilizes newspapers and books written about banking and paper currency in America from 1800 to 1840. Most anti-bank intellectuals writing in these mediums at the time recognized the usefulness of a paper currency in facilitating trade, but did not believe that a paper currency was a sustainable way to run a national economy, because paper bank notes derived their value from something besides labor, which they saw as impossible.

Lindsey Costley (2009, T): Berglund 200@9:00 AM

Title: Literary Batman: The Tragic Hero in Frank Miller?s Batman: The Dark Knight Returns
Major(s): English: Literature
Advisor(s): Beard
Abstract: The popularity of graphic novels is increasing in educational institutions; however, little scholarly criticism has been written about such texts. One of the most influential graphic novels of our time, Frank Miller’s Batman: The Dark Knight Returns has been praised by comic book readers and critics since its 1986 debut, but many scholars dismiss the idea that a graphic novel, especially one written about Batman, could employ common literary conventions such as the tragic hero. After a ten-year retirement, the hero, aging vigilante Bruce Wayne returns to protect Gotham City; the face of crime has changed as the world faces nuclear war, and Batman, a great man brought down by an incompetent media, must fight against a corrupt government for his rights as well as the rights of others, restoring power in the hands of the people. This thesis examines Miller’s Batman as an example of the literary convention of the classic tragic hero within a genre many consider less than literary.

Lindsey Costley (2009, T): Library Conference@4:30 PM

Title: Clean Freak and Other Stories
Major(s): English: Creative Writing
Advisor(s): Pagan
Abstract: This is a creative thesis containing nonfiction and a critical introduction that situates the creative work in a tradition of personal narrative. David Sedaris, Periel Aschenbrand, and Mary Helen Stefaniak include some of the influences that shape the ideas and techniques behind the essays. For example, Sedaris’s situational humor inspired essays such as “The Penis,” in which the author describes her experience drawing live models in an art class. The themes in the collection range from family and loss to personal growth and societal issues, such as homosexuality and discrimination. The title piece, “Clean Freak,” encapsulates several of these themes as the author examines her own obsession with cleanliness.

Andrea Courtnier (2011, T): Price 204@11:00 AM

Title: What are the Effects of Inter-Trial Timing on Contextual Interference?
Major(s): Exercise Science
Advisor(s): Jackson
Abstract: Research has shown that practicing tasks in a random schedule (switching from task to task in no particular sequence), leads to greater learning of a skill when compared to a blocked schedule (performing one task repeatedly before switching to the next). Although those who practice in a blocked fashion show greater learning in an acquisition phase, random schedules produce superior retention and adaptability of a task, termed the Contextual Interference Effect (Simon 1997). Switching from one task to another is theorized to require additional cognitive effort to recall and prepare each skill (Lin et al, 2008). If this is true, it is likely that practicing in a random sequence would require more processing and transition time, which in turn could provide a bias for random practice. Purpose: To further examine the generalizability of the contextual interference effect, and whether random practice leads to longer inter-trial time than blocked practice. Methods: 30 college-age participants performed 90 practice trials of three different key-press sequences. Those in the blocked practice group performed 30 trials of each pattern sequentially, while the random group performed 30 trials of each pattern in an unpredicted order. Participants were tested on their speed and accuracy of the key-press sequences in immediate retention (3 minutes after the acquisition phase) and delayed retention (one day after the acquisition phase). Data Analyses: A 2x2 (schedule x test) repeated measures ANOVA will be performed to determine group differences over time. A t-test will compare the inter-trial time during practice for the blocked and random schedules. Results & Conclusions: Will be presented as to the inter-trial time and performance resulting from random and blocked practice schedules.

Conner Cousins (2014, T): Berglund 232@9:00 AM

Title: Examining Masculinity and the Internalization of Video Game Violence
Major(s): Sociology
Advisor(s): Eisen
Abstract: Previous research examining video game violence (Barlett, Branch, Rodeheffer, and Harris 2009) has focused on the question: are video games a predictor of violent behavior? None of the research reviewed has uncovered any relationship to long-term aggressive behavior, and most of the studies (Williams and Skoric 2005; Boyle and Hibberd 2005; Funk, Baldacci, Pasold, and Baumgardner 2004) finding a relationship between video game violence and aggressive behavior have demonstrated that the effect is not a long term effect (Boyle and Hibberd 2005). Studies continue to be published, pulling the discussion back and forth, but none of them take a step back and look at what factors come in to play before the player picks up a controller. This study examines how adherence to traditional conceptualizations of masculinity influences the way males interpret violence portrayed in video games. Preliminary analyses indicate that masculinity does indeed play a role in how males discuss their appreciation and interpretation of video games violence. Participants scoring lower on the masculinity inventory discussed violence as a means to an end, a device that is used to achieve an established objective, not the objective itself. This study assessed potentially problematic constructions of masculinity and attempted to understand how these traits altered the consumption of violent interactive entertainment.

Joel Cowley (2013, T): Price 204@3:30 PM

Title: The Effect of an Focus of Attention on Swimming Performance
Major(s): Exercise Science
Advisor(s): Jackson
Abstract: Instruction is an important part of how a person learns or improves a skill. Teachers and clinicians can use instruction to direct learners' attention to different critical components of the skill being learned or practised. Recent research by Wulf and colleagues have shown that when these instructions lead the learner to adopt an external focus of attention (i.e., focusing on things outside of the body), they show significantly better performance than when instructed to adopt an internal focus of attention (i.e., focusing on the body's movement). In a recent study by Freudenhelm, Wulf, Madureira, Pasetto, & Correa (2010) researchers found that when novice swimmers adopted and external focus of attention (focusing on pushing the water) they showed greater swim speeds compared to an internal focus of attention (focusing on their hands). Purpose: The current study proposed to expand on previous research by examining whether or not an external focus of attention would lead to greater swimming efficiency than an internal focus. Methods: 31 novice swimmers were recruited to swim 25y lengths of the pool in each of the following conditions: baseline, 3 lengths with an internal focus, 3 lengths with an external focus, and 1 length where participants were able to choose their preferred focus. Swimming speed, stroke length, and swimmer heart rate were recorded for each length of swimming. Data Analyses: A series of paired-sample T-test were used to compare the results of the internal, external, baseline, and choice trials on swimming efficiency and perception. Results & Conclusions: Will be presented as to the effects of focus of attention on swimming efficiency.

Phillip Cox (2011, T): Price 203@4:00 PM

Title: Computational Studies on the Aromaticity of Coordination Compounds
Major(s): Chemistry
Advisor(s): Johnson
Abstract: The chemical definition of aromaticity has undergone a dramatic transformation since its use as a descriptor of the odor of molecules like benzene. As the science of aromatic compounds advanced, the term "aromatic" began to describe the geometric and magnetic properties of particular molecules. Since then, different models have been employed in an attempt to accurately depict the molecular structure and bonding characteristics of aromatic molecules.(1) Molecular orbital theory is a powerful tool in mathematically constructing the orbitals of an aromatic ring. Since the electrons are considered to belong to the entire molecule, and not just the atom from which they came, the electrons in the newly formed delocalized molecular orbital are free to move about the molecule in response to external electric or magnetic fields. This delocalization of electrons in a ring throughout the molecule is the fundamental basis of an aromatic molecule; it greatly affects thermal stability, reactivity, and structure. Additionally, sustained induced ring current is observed under the presence of an external magnetic field.(1)(2) Our studies aim to analyze the effect of peripheral steric strain on internal ring aromaticity, and how that can affect the redox potential of the central metal atom of an aromatic coordination compound. By modeling molecular structures with varying peripheral substituents, we can gain insight into geometric and magnetic changes that occur within the central ring. We suspect that, given an increasing degree of peripheral strain, the aromatic characteristics of the internal ring will falter, causing decreased and constrained electron delocalization throughout the corresponding MO. We have made use of several molecular properties to study aromaticity more thoroughly. Our most quantitative method is a magnetic property called a NICS (nucleus-independent chemical shift) calculation. Beyond NICS values, we also report deviations in bond length and bond angle by comparing to bonds in non-aromatic compounds, such as the carbon-carbon double and single bonds in cyclohexene. We augment these geometric properties with an assessment of the spatial extent of the fully delocalized MO. We have made use of the Amsterdam Density Functional software for our computations. References: 1. Measuring Aromaticity. Zhou, Zhongxiang. 1992, International Reviews in Physical Chemistry, pp. 243-261. 2. Nucleus-Independent Chemical Shifts as Aromaticity Criterion. Chen, Zhongfang, et al. 2005, Chemical Reviews, pp. 3642-3888.

Keely Craig (2014, P): Strain Hall 3rd Floor@11:00 AM

Title: Antibiotic Resistance Mechanisms of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in Patients with Cystic Fibrosis
Major(s): Biology
Advisor(s): Nyerges
Abstract: Pseudomonas aeruginosa is classified by the Center for Disease Control as a severe risk to public health. Each year there are 51,000 infections caused by P. aeruginosa, and 13% of those infections are multi-drug resistant. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the leading cause of airway infections in patients with cystic fibrosis. The continual use of sub-inhibitory antibiotic therapy used in the treatment of cystic fibrosis patients increases the frequency of mutations resulting in lowered antibiotic susceptibility. Genetic and phenotypic variation among P. aeruginosa cells in populations found in patients with cystic fibrosis was shown to lead to increased antibiotic resistance. The mucoid phenotype is caused by small deletions in the mucA gene, which lead to an overproduction in exopolysaccharides. Transitions in the lasR gene result in specific proteases no longer being produced, causing the loss of quorum sensing. The multi-drug resistant phenotype arises from large deletions in the mexZ gene, resulting in an overproduction of drug-efflux pumps. Alterations in the DNA mismatch repair system; specifically the mutS and mutL genes result in strains with large mutation rates specifically in patients with chronic cystic fibrosis infections. A possible alternative to antibiotic therapy is the use of bacteriophages, a bacterial virus to fight infections in order to decrease the mortality rate of cystic fibrosis patients. This analysis summarizes potential mechanisms of resistance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and the use of bacteriophages as an alternative therapy to antibiotics.

Dylan Cramer (2013, T): Price 214@1:30 PM

Title: Evaluating the Risk of Prion Transmission Between Fish and Mammals
Major(s): Biology
Advisor(s): Livingston
Abstract: Prions are infectious proteins that cause a group of invariably fatal neurodegenerative diseases found virtually in all animals, including bovine spongiform encephalopathy of cattle, scrapie of sheep, and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease of humans. In contrast to pathogens carrying information in nucleic acids such as bacteria or viruses, prions appear to have strain-specific properties in the tertiary structure of the infectious prion form, PrPSc. When a prion enters a healthy organism, it causes existing, normal PrPC folded proteins to convert into the disease-associated prion form PrPSc. Transmission of prions between species is thought to be limited by a "species barrier," which depends on differences in the physical structure of prions as well as the genes coding for the prions. However, as seen by the outbreak of mad cow disease among cattle in Great Britain, and the subsequent diagnosis of more than 50 individuals with Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease since 1986, inter-species transmission is possible. The average American consumes about 16 pounds of fish annually, a major food source that could harbor prions, with about 80% of that coming from fisheries. After analyzing and comparing multiple fish prion genes to human ones, it was found that there is a strong divergent history with the two evolving separately. Key differences in the gene sequence and tertiary structure between fish and mammalian prions provides evidence that the relative risk for a cross-species transmission is low.

Ben Creasy (2008, T): Library Classroom@9:00 AM

Title: The Economics of Organic Farming
Major(s): Economics
Advisor(s): Ruder


Abstract: Organic agriculture has grown from near nonexistence to approximately 2% of global farmland in the past 20 years, representing a 20-25% average annual growth rate. In the process organic products have become common in the developed world, reflecting strong consumer demand and environmental awareness. Although several studies find organic farms to be more profitable on average than conventional farms, organic certification has been slowed by risk factors, transition costs, and government policy favoring conventional methods. Studies also showed that organic farms outyield conventional farms in drought conditions. Multiple regression analysis of state-level data precipitation data while controlling for a liberal state effect shows that farmers have converted more cropland in drier areas, consistent with theoretical expectations.

Ben Creasy (2008, T): Marsh 101@11:00 AM

Title: Free To Choose ? Or Not?
Major(s): Philosophy
Advisor(s): Boersema


Abstract: Assuming that the world is wholly material and that all events are caused entirely by past events, the universe must be deterministic, and all people must have only one fate determined entirely by nature and nurture (i.e., genetics and upbringing). Humans, then, seem to have no more power over their fate than any other material objects in the universe. Moral responsibility intuitively seems to claim that one is to blame for how one developed, but one’s moral development is a function of variables outside one’s control – genetics and upbringing. Moral judgments are then a judgment on a person’s developed character. These judgments are necessary for a functioning society in that through these judgments we reward moral behavior and deter immoral behavior. Individuals must accept responsibility for their character regardless of past circumstances. Despite all of this, humans are self-conscious beings and are able to analyze the deterministic pattern around them. This offers a sense of freedom, but this freedom is not consistent with the typical sense of free will or our typical conception of moral responsibility.

Jodi Creeden (2011, P): Strain Hall 1st Floor@1:00 PM

Title: Seasonal Variation in Prey Selection by North American River Otters (Lontra canadensis)
Major(s): Biology
Advisor(s): Alkaslassy
Abstract: Recent research casts doubt on previous studies showing that North American river otters (Lontra canadensis) are specialized predators favoring slow-moving medium-sized fish. In this study we will determine if seasonal variation in prey selection occurs in North American River Otters by evaluating whether seasonal fluctuations in fish communities are accurately represented in the diets of river otters. To test this hypothesis, we propose to examine the prey selection of river otters in each season by examining and analyzing scat. We will simultaneously measure the changes in available fish within each season. Comparing the observed fish populations to the prey selection of the otters within each season will help us determine 1) if seasonal variation in prey selection exists for river otters and 2) if river otters are opportunistic or specialized predators.

Elizabeth Crooker (2014, T): Marsh LL5@9:00 AM

Title: The Human Bower-Bird
Major(s): Art
Advisor(s): Cheyne
Abstract: In my Senior Art Project I want to show the connections between humans and animals. Not just emotional connections, but also habits and behaviors we have in common. To do this I am building a human sized "nest" to represent the bower-bird, which is where I got my inspiration from. In front of the nest will be different objects representing parts of human courting and marriage traditions (e.g. wine glasses, flowers, broom, etc.) or gifts one person would give another (e.g. books, candy, stuffed animals, etc.). Viewers will be able to interact with my nest and objects as well as take a piece of my project away with them in the form of paper petals.

Dean Croshere (2007, T): Library Classroom@3:30 PM

Title: High Noon: Can Self Defense Ruin a Hero's Good Name?
Major(s): Philosophy
Advisor(s): Boersema


Abstract: Will Kane, the hero of the 1952 western film High Noon, is often considered to be the epitome of Kant's Categorical Imperative. As a strong hero, Kane saves the day and the town by doing the right thing because it is the right thing to do. A closer examination of Kant's Categorical Imperative, however, does not support his actions as moral.

Dean Croshere (2007, T): Price 203@1:00 PM

Title: Boxer: The Evolution of a Mascot
Major(s): Media Arts
Advisor(s): Luers
Hibbard

Abstract: "I thought it was a pistol. I thought he held it right up to my head." -Lee Drew, '49. Lee Drew was determined to get Boxer, even with a gun held to his head. Throughout the years, Boxer has been many things to many people. The Evolution of a Mascot is a documentary film that explores these people and their experiences.

Chelsea Crosslin (2010, T): Price 204@1:00 PM

Title: Managing Antibiotic Resistance In Staphylococcus Aureus
Major(s): Biology
Advisor(s): Halpern
Abstract: The use of antibiotics to treat nearly all bacterial infections led to the appearance of bacteria strains showing resistance to numerous drugs. New pathways and mutations in proteins allow bacteria to elude antibiotic-induced apoptosis. Most dramatically, this has led to the emergence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), which is challenging health care systems worldwide. In this capstone, I review the mechanisms for the origin of antibiotic resistance, including mutagenesis and horizontal gene transfer, as well as the molecular basis for antibiotic resistance in Staphylococcus aureus. I evaluate the costs and benefits of resistance in different environments, and apply these analyses to the management of resistance in medical settings. I argue the correct use of antibiotics depends on incorporating current knowledge about both molecular mechanisms and evolutionary principles.

Samantha Cruz (2014, T): Marsh 101@8:30 AM

Title: Student Predictors of Diversity Program Involvement and Associations with Campus Climate
Major(s): Psychology
Advisor(s): Salgado
Abstract: Campus climate, defined as perceptions of the academic and social environments on campus, has been a major focus in efforts to create more inclusive and multiculturally-competent educational environments. Diversity interventions have been associated with improving key dimensions of campus climate, including campus satisfaction, cross-cultural comfort, sense of belonging, and changes in attitudes toward diversity. However, previous research suggests participation in interventions may be limited to students representing specific subgroups within the larger student body, and there is little evidence to determine whether curricular or co-curricular diversity interventions would have the most impact on campus climate dimensions. The current study examined student predictors of participation in diversity programs as well as the associations between curricular and co-curricular diversity intervention participation and campus climate. Using survey data from 168 undergraduate students, the vast majority of student predictors were not found to be significantly related to the amount of participation in diversity-related activities. Curricular exposure to diversity was associated with greater campus satisfaction and cross-cultural comfort, while co-curricular exposure to diversity was singularly correlated with a better sense of belonging to the campus community. Exposure to both curricular and co-curricular diversity interventions were associated with improved attitudes toward diversity. Implications of the current research highlight the importance of promoting student participation and providing diversity programming in a variety of campus contexts.

Brittany Cuff (2009, T): Price 204@10:30 AM

Title: List Coloring and Rook Polynomials: Using Chess to Determine How Many Ways to Color a Graph
Major(s): Mathematics
Advisor(s): Neudauer
Abstract: How many ways can you color a map? How many ways can you place r rooks on an mxn chessboard? In graph theory, we color vertices of a graph in such a way that if two vertices are adjacent, they are colored differently. List coloring is a restriction of this coloring where not every color is available to each vertex. We now assign each vertex a list of allowed colors in which it may be colored. A rook polynomial is a generating function that represents the number of ways we can place r non-attacking rooks on an mxn chessboard, where non-attacking is a placement such that no rook shares a column or row with any other rook. We connect list coloring to rook polynomials by transforming the relationship between a graph's vertices and associated list assignment into a rook board. We have proved that a complete graph G that has a valid list assignment will result in a rook polynomial whose leading coefficient gives the number of proper colorings of G. We take this result further by determining the number of proper colorings of G if G is not complete via inclusion.

Iain Culp (2009, T): Library Conference@10:30 AM

Title: Spook? Stories: An Evening of Ghostly Storytelling
Major(s): Theatre
Advisor(s): Margolis
Abstract: “Spook” Stories was an experimental theatre project exploring oral storytelling, spatial relation, monologue writing, and how to tell a few ghost stories on Halloween night. Using three different locations, I told a collection of four ghost stories, and explored how the three locations—Tom Miles Theatre, Old College Hall, and Knight Hall—offered different qualities which in turn affected the audience’s perceptions of the stories. My presentation will include video clips from the October 31st Halloween show, and pieces of the stories told live.

Iain Culp (2009, T): Berglund 200@2:30 PM

Title: "no sense in trying" : Trickster humor in the 1965 albums of Bob Dylan
Major(s): English: Literature
Advisor(s): Beard
Abstract: Dylan has always been a “freewheelin’” trickster: passing out jokes and puns like candy to everyone from his critics to his most loyal of fans. His ever-changing personae on display for the public eye—finger-pointing folk singer, psychedelic Haight-Ashbury rocker, lone cowboy from way out west, dutiful preacher, or constant on-the-go performer—gives us a strong comic sense, which runs from style to style and album to album. This personae also hints of the “Trickster” who transgresses boundaries, defies the norm, mocks the rules, brings chaos to the world, ultimately bringing a paradigm shift to all those he encounters. Such a trickster is found throughout Dylan’s entire career, but is most evident in the psychedelic-surrealist setting of the 1965 albums Bringing It All Back Home and Highway 61 Revisited. My thesis explores how this trickster motif works in Dylan’s lyrics as a key to unlocking meaning in a constantly shifting world.

Ryan Culp (2012, T): Marsh 106@10:00 AM

Title: How "Natural" is Biophilia: If Women Are Disgusted, Why Are They Pro-Environmental?
Major(s): Psychology
Advisor(s): Burns-Glover
Abstract: The purpose of this study was to resolve an inconsistency in ecological psychology findings: The biophilia hypothesis states that all living organisms need interaction with other living organisms in order to maintain a healthy state. However, research consistently both reports gender differences in environmental attitudes, with women scoring higher than men on more pro-environmental scales as well as on scales of fear, disgust sensitivity (biophobia; women have generally scored on higher disgust sensitivity). Previous research has proposed that such differences may not be biological sex differences, but differences in the socialization of men and women towards others; with men being socialized for more individual traits, and women being socialized with more empathic traits resulting in a more pro-environmental personality. Inversely the adherence to gender-roles may explain the discrepancies seen in disgust responses. To explore the relative importance of gender versus sex, I recruited 25 males (47.2%) and 28 females (52.8%) to complete a confidential online survey. Participants were asked to respond to two measures, the Bem Sex Role Inventory (BSRI), a measure of gender schemas [masculine, feminine, and androgynous, and undifferentiated] and the Bixler Environmental Disgust Scale, a scale used to measures fear of and disgust sensitivity towards features commonly encountered in the natural environment. I tested the hypothesis that gender-schematized women would report the highest levels of disgust sensitivity. Androgynous females would have lower levels of disgust sensitivity. Males who scored high on "feminine" attributes would also have high disgust, but not as high as feminine females. Understanding the role of socially constructed gender rather than sex differences in environmental attitudes might help resolve the Biophilia vs. Biophobia gender paradox.

Giselle Cummings (2012, T): CLIC@11:00 AM

Title: Renogiating the Past: The Liminality of East Germans
Major(s): Anthropology
International Studies
Advisor(s): Mahar
French
Abstract: The fall of the Berlin Wall was a highly momentous event in recent world history. It has even greater significance for the citizens of the former German Democratic Republic, asthey have lived and adapted to a reunified Germany for the past twenty two years. Through historical analysis and personal narratives, this thesis will explore East German childhood and how East Germans renegotiate their past and navigate their lives in a reunified Germany.

Brandi Cundiff (2009, T): Milky Way@8:30 AM

Title: From High Heels to Combat Boots
Major(s): Media Arts: Film and Video Production
Advisor(s): Hardacker
Abstract: Women in the military have recently become a common site, but it has not always been that way. Since the early 1900s battles have been waged to provide equal rights between men and women in the military. However, sexism still exists on the front line. In my project I use personal experience and interviews with my peers to depict some of the attitudes that leave a distinct division between these men and women.

Heidi Cupp (2010, T): CLIC@11:00 AM

Title: Recidivism in Inmates with Drug Related Crimes
Major(s): Anthropology
Advisor(s): Mahar
Abstract: Often times, inmates are looked at as a number, or a group rather than the individual. More often than not, more than half of all inmates will return to prison within three years of being released. This project seeks to investigate inmates who are affected by drug related recidivism; specifically, I have worked in a medium security prison looking at recidivism and what can be changed to lower the rates of recidivism. This study also investigates the structure of prison culture and state requirements of care for drug and alcohol addicted inmates.

Allison Curtis (2007, T): Price 214@2:30 PM

Title: Exploring the Movement Variation Overuse Injury Relationship: Stress Fractures
Major(s): Exercise Science
Advisor(s): Schot


Abstract: Background: Variability is an inherent human movement characteristic expressed in a myriad of situations ranging from the way we walk to the regulation of heart rate. Variations expressed as different individuals perform a task are fairly obvious. Subtle, but meaningful, variation also is expressed across repeated efforts performed by one individual ("within-subject variability") and may play a role in musculoskeletal injury. Excess variation may lead to acute injuries, while invariance could contribute to overuse injures. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to compare and contrast within-subject variability characteristics among participants with a history of overuse injury. Methods: Adults with a history of unilateral lower-leg stress fracture performed 20 drop landings from 60 cm onto a force platform. Participants landed normally on both feet, with one foot on the platform and the other on the adjacent flooring, alternating limbs each trial. Peak force for each trial was identified, and the within-limb variation in peak force across trials was calculated. Analysis: The peak impact force (PF) and its coefficient of variation (CV) were contrasted for injured and healthy limbs via t-tests. Results: There was no difference between limbs for PF. There was a slight difference for the CV. The injured leg was 37% less variable than the healthy leg. Conclusions: PF responses were variable and did not appear to relate to injury history. However, the CV results were compatible with the proposed overuse variability mechanism.

Caitlin Curtis (2009, T): Marsh 201@4:00 PM

Title: Let?s Talk About Court: Developing and Implementing a Court Orientation Program for Foster Youth
Major(s): Social Work
Advisor(s): Doerfler
Abstract: Recent studies suggest a need for an increase in dependency hearing participation among youth who are in foster care, but there is a lack in action taken to achieve this. Studies show dismal participation rates among youth who are in foster care although the youth’s voice is often revered as the most important voice within the dependency court setting. Keeping these findings in mind, a partnership was developed between the Department of Human Services, the Washington County Judicial Department and the Social Work practicum student in order to create and implement a court orientation program for Washington County foster youth ages 12 and older in an effort to increase participation at dependency hearings. Empowerment Theory was the basis for the development and implementation process with the goal of empowering the youth and enabling them to attend their dependency hearings and to speak for themselves with more confidence and ease. This presentation will highlight the process taken by the Social Work practicum student in developing a unique and proactive orientation for the youth who are in foster care as well as the lessons learned through the initial implementation.

Allan Cushing (2012, T): Berglund 232@2:00 PM

Title: Rough Housing to an "A"
Major(s): Education
Advisor(s): Nelson
Abstract: The purpose of our project is to investigate developmental, social, physical, and academic benefits that may be aided or enhanced through rough-and-tumble play. The investigation took place at The Early Learning Community at Pacific University (ELC). Data collected included parent surveys, teacher questionnaires, pictures, videos, and 36 hours of field notes all focusing on children 3-6 years of age. The data collected was analyzed and coded based on themes found in the review of the literature. Themes used for the data analyses included (a) developmental benefits, (b) gender differences, and (c) assessment and regulation. Our critical questions included the following. How do boys and girls attention, concentration, and focus levels change prior to rough-and-tumble play and after rough-and-tumble play? How does talk and language regarding problem solving and conflict resolution, among the children, develop through rough-and-tumble play? What can teachers do to facilitate rough-and-tumble play in order to maximize learning and physical potential?

John Cushman (2012, T): Marsh 201@8:30 AM

Title: How much is enough? A look at the infrastructure spending and transportation needs of America
Major(s): Economics
Advisor(s): Ruder
Abstract: The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) signed by president Obama in 2009 was intended to battle the 2008 financial crisis. At the time, economists and lawmakers argued over how large the stimulus should be and how it should be spent. One of the main areas where almost all economists agreed spending would be effective at boosting employment while improving prospects for future growth was infrastructure: roads, bridges, water supplies, electric grids, and telecommunications. This study investigates the size of infrastructure spending in ARRA and the effect of that infrastructure spending on employment.

Emmalia Dacalio-Spencer (2010, T): Berglund 232@9:30 AM

Title: Social Skills and Social Interaction in Early Childhood Development: Playing Well With Others Starts at a Young Age
Major(s): Social Work
Advisor(s): Schweitzer
Abstract: Research studies have shown that social skills used in daily life facilitate communication and interaction among people. These skills influence our ability to make decisions, have flexible behaviors in diverse situations, and practice ways to communicate better. The lack of these skills in early childhood can negatively affect children as they grow into adults. This project applies Social Learning Theory in a local school classroom by teaching social skills in small multi-aged activity groups, hypothesizing that the children will improve their interaction with one another and will be capable of applying their new knowledge in their classroom, public, and home environments. Students were assessed on their ability to continuously apply these social skills, in which they display positive behavior. Challenges of working with multi-aged groups, the long-term effects, and the prospects of enhanced quality of life will also be discussed.

Rose Dahl (2013, T): CLIC@9:00 AM

Title: Cuisine, Culture, and the Future of Organic in France
Major(s): World Languages: French
Advisor(s): de Larquier
Abstract: France is perhaps most famous worldwide for its longstanding tradition of excellent cuisine and the care and rituals surrounding the preparation and consumption of food, known collectively as gastronomie, a term for which there is no real equivalent in English. Within this culture that respects, appreciates, and is in general passionate about the origins and preparation of food, an industrial agricultural system has developed; in response, an alternative, organic food movement has emerged in France. However, organics have not seen considerable success there, faring even worse in terms of market shares than in the U.S. In an effort to better understand both the present struggles and the future of the organic movement in France, I investigate from a socio-cultural perspective the reasons why French consumers, so well known for their love of food, have not embraced organic products more extensively. First, I seek to understand how the average French consumer understands the notion of "quality" as it pertains to food and how this definition compares to that of the average American consumer. Second, I analyze the role of traditionalism in French culture and its effects on food preferences and production and, ultimately, French perspectives on organic food. In doing so, I hope to shed light on the complexities surrounding the French organic food movement and the enactment of gastronomie in contemporary France.

Rose Dahl (2013, T): Marsh 201@3:30 PM

Title: Sticking to Your Moral Guns: Cultivating Intimacy and Constructing Codes of Conduct in Relationships Between Exotic Dancers and Their Regular Customers
Major(s): Sociology
Advisor(s): Whitehead
Abstract: My conclusions are based on nine in-depth phone interviews with women working as erotic performers in strip clubs. While stripping as a type of sex work deals at surface level in the exchange of erotic performance for cash, underlying this sexualized service are a multitude of emotional exchanges between dancers and customers. Drawing from Arlie Hochschild's theorization of emotions, I consider much of the work erotic dancers do in the process of cultivating relationships with regular customers to be emotional labor, or the commodification of emotions featured in the service sector (Hochschild 1983). In addition to performing emotional labor, I found that dancers employ complex emotion management and boundary setting techniques as they navigate these relationships that fall outside of the normative realm of intimacy. To my participants, this is a business model; but in an industry that deals in emotions, it is a model for managing emotions (both their own and those of their regulars). This study highlights the ways people construct their own ad hoc codes of conduct in relationships where there is no taken for granted script.

Liam Dalton (2014, T): Strain 121@9:00 AM

Title: Decentralized Routing Protocols in Rapidly Changing Networks
Major(s): Computer Science
Advisor(s): Khoja
Abstract: As computers become more and more mobile, network protocols that assume static network organization become less and less useful. Adding support to network infrastructure for rapidly shifting nodes is imperative. We tested several new routing protocols, and also implemented standard decentralized protocols such as the DV (Distance Vector) algorithm to compare the performance against a preexisting baseline. We developed a testing bed for rapidly prototyping different routing protocols designed around unreliable data transfer. We gathered statistics on each protocol's performance, and present them for consideration.

Sean Dalton (2014, T): Berglund 232@9:30 AM

Title: Health and Capital: How Social Life Shapes Physical Health on the College Campus
Major(s): Sociology
Advisor(s): Eisen
Abstract: The connection between social capital and physical health has been well established in sociology and public health literature. Past research has found the relationship to be positive, as higher rates of social capital often reflect higher rates of physical health. While this study has been duplicated in many different settings, the connection has yet to be evaluated in the setting of the college campus. This study aims to fill this gap in literature, and evaluate the relationship between social capital and physical health on the small liberal arts college campus. Specifically, this study evaluates the effect that social capital, or the social networks in which we live and connect, has on ones physical health, the body's physical wellness. Data for this study were collected on a small liberal arts college located in the Portland metro area, through the use of an anonymous online survey. The survey included a social capital scale and a physical health scale, which allowed participants to be identified as having high, medium, or low social capital and high, medium, or low physical health. Chi-square analysis were conducted to evaluate the association between social capital and physical health, while controlling for the variables gender, class status, athlete status, and living status. Methodological suggestions for future studies that examine the impact of social capital on physical health are discussed.

Liam Dalton (2014, T): Strain 121@3:00 PM

Title: Iterative 3D Scanning with Structured Light
Major(s): Mathematics
Advisor(s): Breslin
Abstract: 3-dimensional models of real-world objects can be acquired using scanning techniques of varying cost and quality. In this research, we reproduced the cheapest of such techniques: structured-light scanning. We improve on preexisting methods by computing the error in the model as well as the model, and then using this error to determine where to execute further scanning.

Katharine Dalziel (2009, T): Milky Way@9:30 AM

Title: The Key to All Heaven
Major(s): Media Arts: Film and Video Production
Advisor(s): Hardacker
Abstract: A child learns to say “I love you” before ever knowing what the phrase means. As we travel through life’s phases into adulthood, our understanding of the word “love” transforms with us, but the intangibility of its meaning precludes any one individual from ever claiming a complete knowledge of its varied definitions. The Key to All Heaven is an experimental short focusing on interpretations of love in a society dominated by the ideal of heteronormative romance ending in marriage. Using vintage (mid-20th Century) U.S. ephemeral films and material gathered from Disney’s Cinderella along with original footage, this film examines the ethereality of this element of the human experience which we attempt to apply with such permanence to our lives.

Hunter Dassonville (2014, T): CLIC@10:30 AM

Title: Slow and Stopped Light: Optical Storage in Rubidium Vapor
Major(s): Physics
Advisor(s): Dawes
Abstract: Due to the coherent optical nonlinear property of rubidium vapor, light beams can interact in certain manners that can be exploited for photonic research. The interaction that this research implores is electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT). Using a 795 nm infrared diode laser, our experiment explores the phenomenon of dispersion which is attendant in the EIT window. Our laser is split into two separate beams (probe and control) which are directed into an enriched rubidium 87 vapor cell and creates the EIT via quantum interference. The dispersion within the EIT window causes slow light or a delay in our photon beam. The control beam is switched off which caused the probe beam to be stored into the rubidium atoms. Upon renewal of the control beam the probe beam exits the rubidium cell. This research tests to see how long the probe beam can be stored in the rubidium atoms and still retain information.

Kayla Davidson (2014, T): Berglund 216@3:30 PM

Title: Mathematics and Grit: Teaching Strategies for Elementary School
Major(s): Education
Advisor(s): Phillips
Abstract: The intent of our project was to notice and name various teaching strategies to promote grit in the third, fourth, fifth, and sixth grade math classrooms at the request of the Forest Grove Community School. We also looked at how attitudes towards math played out through the students' mindsets. For our project, we: 1) read and reviewed literature related to grit, teaching strategies, and mindsets; 2) observed in third, fourth, fifth, and sixth grade math classrooms to better understand students' current mindsets towards grit in math; and 3) worked with the Forest Grove Community School teachers to develop teaching strategies which would promote grit in their math classrooms. Data collected through our observations were synthesized and analyzed. By scaffolding perseverance-based math strategies, teachers are able to positively impact students' motivation. Finally, the practical applications of our research will be provided to the teachers at the Forest Grove Community School in a formal presentation as well as in a portfolio of collective teaching strategies to promote grit.

Bree Davis (2007, T): Marsh 206@1:30 PM

Title: The War on Drugs: Sound Policy or Bureaucratic Blow
Major(s): Politics and Government
Advisor(s): Seward


Abstract: Although the War on Drugs is widely accepted to be failing, it continues to consume a significant part of America's budget. Through examining structures of power and policy windows in America's history since the Nixon administration, my project will attempt to explain why the War on Drugs began and why it continues. By identifying the political forces producing and supporting the War on Drugs, I will explain what political hurdles must be overcome to implement new drug policy in America.

Katie Davis (2007, T): McGill Auditorium@8:30 AM

Title: Men with Breast Cancer: An In-Depth Look at a Woman's Disease in Men
Major(s): Media Arts
Advisor(s): Cassady


Abstract: In the past few years, the amount of information available to the public about breast cancer and creating awareness about breast cancer has grown. However, most information and campaigns are targeted at women. Breast cancer is found most commonly in women and is considered a woman's disease; however, breast cancer can be found in men, as well. For my project I have developed a series of articles addressing the issue of men with breast cancer and the different issues that arise for men battling a disease that is publicly viewed as a woman's disease. I plan to submit my articles to local newspapers for publication to help bring awareness about this issue.

Michelle Davis (2008, T): Marsh 206@3:00 PM

Title: Blessed are the Peacemakers: The Role of International Intervention in Congolese State Development
Major(s): Politics and Government
Advisor(s): Seward


Abstract: My thesis examines the role of international intervention in nation building, using the Democratic Republic of the Congo as a case study. The word chaos fails to describe the complete lack of political and economic organization existing in the DRC, a nation of 65 million. Poverty, continued warfare, and complete lack of infrastructure (such as roads) provide massive barriers to all third parties attempting to speed state development. Historically, due to idealistic mandates and minimal resources, UN missions and international interference have only aggravated already miserable conditions; this thesis brings ambition and reality closer together, providing a more realistic recommendation for third parties in nation building.

Michelle Davis (2008, T): Price 204@9:30 AM

Title: The Myth of the Twentieth Century: Arian Supremacy in Nazi Germany
Major(s): World Languages
Advisor(s): French


Abstract: My thesis examines the racial ideology of Alfred Rosenberg, head “philosopher” of the Nazi party, as portrayed through his pivotal work, Der Mythus des Zwanzigsten Jahrhunderts (The Myth of the Twentieth Century). My presentation is broken into three parts: first is an examination of influential 19th and 20th century authors on “Arian superiority” and the “Jewish problem” (including Houston Stewart Chamberlain, Hans F.K. Guenther, Arthur de Gobineau, and Adolf Hitler); this is followed by a description of Rosenberg’s main theories regarding Jews and Arian mythology; an analysis of his influence on Nazi policy and thought will conclude the presentation.

Cameron Davis (2013, T): Price 214@9:00 AM

Title: Isolating and Identifying Novel Phytoestrogens from Gaultheria shallon
Major(s): Biology
Advisor(s): Baugher
Abstract: Phytoestrogens are secondary plant metabolites produced by plants that are similar in structure estrogen. Human consumption of these compounds has been associated with many health benefits. This projects aims to identify novel plant sources of phytoestrogens within the Pacific Northwest. In this study, we investigated the potential phytoestrogen content of Gaultheria shallon (salal), a plant native to the western coastal regions of the United States. Data from our lab show that estrogen receptor positive cells proliferate in response to treatment with isolated fractions of EtOAc salal extract. We have found that this increase in proliferation can be blocked by inhibition of the estrogen receptor. This information indicates that the bioactive compound found in G. shallon is acting on the estrogen receptor. In this study, we report a novel, optimized method used to isolate the individual compounds present within the bioactive, EtOAc extract. Using High Pressure Liquid Chromatography, we have formed a procedure with a flow rate of 4.5mL/min and long gentle gradients, which allow for maximum separation of compounds to increase the purity of our collected product. This collected material can then be dried and held in scintillation vials for bioactivity testing and characterization. Initial HPLC runs indicated at least 19 different possible compounds with high levels of absorbance at 254nm and 280nm, indicating conjugation, that may be acting as phytoestrogens. These isolated compounds were then tested in human mammary cells for estrogenic activity. Five of these compounds were positive for estrogenic activity. Currently, we are in the process of gathering structural information related to these compounds by using High Resolution Mass Spectrometry

Cayla Davis (2013, T): Berglund 145@9:30 AM

Title: D Is for Davis, Drugs, Dysfunction: A Series of Nonfiction Essays
Major(s): English: Creative Writing
Advisor(s): Pagan
Abstract: This is a creative thesis containing nonfiction and a critical introduction that uses personal narrative to touch on the complexities and dysfunctions of family life. Motivated by works from David Sedaris, Nick Flynn and Debra Gwartney, these essays are segmented by time, space, and scene. For example, Flynn's short and unconventional chapters in his memoir Another Bullshit Night in Suck City inspire the parallel narratives of pieces like "The Promise of Clean" where disjointed tales are hinged together in a "like father, like son" scenario. The overarching ideas encapsulated in this thesis concern a coming of age and the universal truth that families are never perfect.

Bryan Davis (2014, T): Berglund 139@1:00 PM

Title: The Nature of Mechanism: Fear of "the Other" from Mary Shelley's Frankenstein to Bram Stoker's Dracula
Major(s): English: Literature
Advisor(s): Bove
Abstract: Thomas Carlyle once wrote, "to us who live in the midst of all this, and see continually the faith, hope and, practice of every one founded on Mechanism of one kind or other, it is apt to seem quite natural, and as if it could never have been otherwise." The British industrial revolution, when these words were written, was herald to some of the most profound societal, economic, and political changes in European history. Using Dickens as a framework, this thesis seeks to explore these paradigm shifts-particularly in the industrial and scientific aspects of society-as they unfold throughout the course of the Victorian era. Authors such as Mary Shelley and Bram Stoker, active at the outset and the conclusion, respectively, of Queen Victoria's reign, use a similar dichotomy between monster and scientist to make vastly different commentary on the state of society and the fears prevalent during their lifetimes. Do these fears, represented through supernatural beings like Dracula and Frankenstein's monster, reflect the "other" within industrial society, or are they, as Carlyle says, "apt to seem quite natural," as if these monsters had existed all along?

Dakota Davison (2014, T): Marsh 106@2:00 PM

Title: A Program Evaluation of An Animal Assisted Therapy Program
Major(s): Psychology
Advisor(s): Island
Abstract: This project reflects a guided program evaluation for an animal-assisted activity program, The Little Dog Laughed. This program is different from other animal-assisted therapy programs in that the observed collective sessions took place at two short-term residential domestic violence shelters. During other animal-assisted therapy programs, the interactive sessions are long-term and focus on the individual, both with respect to the objective goals and through the recording of progress. The Little Dog Laughed is an animal-activity program that uses dog training as a form for non-violent problem solving and life skills training. In conjunction with behavioral therapy professionals, this program gives opportunities for children of domestic abuse to interact with the dogs in short, 20-minute training sessions once a week. The children are introduced to a learning goal, provided guidelines for respectfully working with the dog, as well as tools (e.g., clickers and hand signals) to promote clear communication between the child and the trained dog model. See, Tag And Reward ("STAR"), the learning model for The Little Dog Laughed is consistent with the Positive Behavioral Intervention Supports (PBIS) plan used in schools for improving problem behavior. The two domestic violence shelters visited typically house families for 30 days or less, as the families may then elect to leave or are placed in a more permanent living situation. The opportunities to train and observe outcomes are limited both in terms of the length of each visit as well as the number of visits each residence receives. Therefore evaluating individual outcomes for a program of this kind can be challenging. Rather than observe changes in behavior over the long-term, since this data is not available, we examine short-term improvement. Behavioral improvement was evaluated through focal observation every 5 minutes for the 15 to 20 minute training sessions over a 12-week period. Areas of improvement were put into categories based on six different learning and behavioral goals: Metacognition (i.e., introspection, perspective-taking, error management, etc.), Engagement (e.g., paying attention), Instruction Adherence, Concept Recognition, Attitude, and Affect (e.g., animated, outgoing, fearful, etc.). The results of this program evaluation will be discussed relative to these six outcome goals.

Jacob Davison (2014, P): Strain Hall 2nd Floor@3:00 PM

Title: Resveratrol induces p53 independent apoptosis in cancer cells
Major(s): Biology
Advisor(s): Baugher
Abstract: Cancer is one of the leading causes of death in the United States. The mechanism by which many cancer treatments function is thwarted by a dysfunctional, or missing, p53 gene. Therefore, finding a treatment that functions independently of p53 would provide a significant improvement in the fight against cancer. Such a treatment could lead to a significant increase in cancer survivability. Resveratrol is a phytochemical, a phytoestrogen, and a powerful antioxidant with known antitumor activity. It is present in grapes, blueberries, peanuts, and many other foods commonly found in the Western diet. Resveratrol's positive physiological effects have long been known both in the scientific community as well as the general population. In vitro and in vivo studies demonstrate that resveratrol is capable of inducing cell death in cancer cells. Importantly, research suggests that resveratrol can induce cell death independently of p53 gene function. However, pathways activated by resveratrol vary widely depending on the cell line upon which it is acting. Therefore, a more complete evaluation and understanding of the molecular mechanisms by which resveratrol functions could lead to more effective cancer treatments.

Justin Dean (2011, T): Library Conference@11:00 AM

Title: More Than Meets The Eye: Design in Disguise
Major(s): Philosophy
Advisor(s): Boersema
Abstract: The Participatory Anthropic Principle states that observers are necessary to bring the universe into being. It is one of four versions of the Anthropic Principle that subliminally posits human observational abilities as evidence for a kind of intelligent design but for reasons shown in the paper fails to do so because of both logical weaknesses and faulty underlying assumptions about teleology.

Justin Dean (2011, T): Marsh 201@9:00 AM

Title: The Kitchen is Everywhere: Stress, food presence, and effects on consumption
Major(s): Psychology
Advisor(s): Eap
Abstract: Heightened levels of stress experienced by individuals are likely contributing to epidemic obesity rates. Stress may also lead people to eat unhealthy foods as a way to cope. This kind of eating is dubbed emotional eating because the behavior may satisfy a perceived emotional need rather than a physiological one. This study is interested in the effect(s) of acute stress and visual food cues on emotional eating. Obesity is and will continue to be a major public health problem, so it is important to identify psychological variables related to eating behavior.

Daniel DeBates (2013, T): Price 202@3:30 PM

Title: Effects of Snowboard Binding Orientation and Load on Lower Extremity Stresses
Major(s): Exercise Science
Advisor(s): Schot
Abstract: Snowboarding currently is the fastest growing winter sport. As with most vigorous and dynamic sports, injury is fairly common and justifies scientific inquiry into the biomechanical consequences of participating in such activities. An injury distinctive to the snowboarder's front foot is fracture of the lateral process of the talus bone (a component of the ankle joint complex). Binding alignment may influence the stresses experienced by the lower extremity. Purpose: To examine differences in implied stresses experienced by the lead foot and lower leg across varied binding angles and under varied loading levels. Methods: 12 subjects performed a continuous squatting and rising movement at a controlled cadence to simulate snowboarding landings. Six experimental conditions were created by combining 3 binding angles (0o, 22.5o, or 45o) and 2 load levels (100% and 120% of body weight). The rear boot binding was affixed to the testing area such that it is isolated from and level with the force platform at a constant distance (0.55m, about shoulder width) from the lead foot. Analysis: The influence of binding angle, load level and their interactions on lead foot and leg stresses were examined via 3x2 factorial ANOVA with repeated measures. Results: Findings will be delivered at time of presentation.

Tony DeChiara (2013, T): Price 204@11:30 AM

Title: The Accuracy of Peer Process Assessments performed by Elementary Physical Education Students
Major(s): Exercise Science
Advisor(s): Alstot
Abstract: In recent years, the importance of student assessment in and for physical education has been increasingly recognized within the international physical education community (Hay & Penny, 2010; Johnson, 2004; Kaardal, 2001). However relevant this process may be, there is an apparent lack of research to determine whether children possess the ability to accurately perform peer assessments (Hay & Penny, 2010). With these assessments being held in such high regard within the physical education community, but lacking empirical evidence of their accuracy, teachers must consider the legitimacy of having their students undergo such tasks. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine the degree of accuracy with which elementary physical education students performed a peer process assessment of an overhand throwing skill. Method: Typically developing elementary aged boys and girls were asked to assess the technique with which peers performed an overhand throw skill. Students were placed in groups of two; the first participant performed five trials of the overhand throw task while the partner filled out an assessment sheet which assessed the performance of each trial. Once complete, pairs switched roles and the process was repeated; the performer became the assessor and the assessor became the performer. Trials were conducted once a week for first through third grade physical education classes and continued for a total of 4 sessions. All trials were video recorded and observed by the researcher to assess each participant's performance. Participants' peer assessments were then compared to the researcher's criterion assessment and checked for accuracy. Data Analysis: An ANOVA was used to examine differences in the accuracy of the assessments between the three grade levels as well as differences between the four assessment sessions over time. Results & Conclusions: Will be discussed on Senior Projects Day.

Cloe Dedman (2012, T): Price 214@10:30 AM

Title: The relative risk of breast cancer in relation to oral contraceptive use
Major(s): Biology
Advisor(s): Lopez
Abstract: Breast cancer is one of the most common types of cancer affecting women today. There are several risk factors for breast cancer. However, there is little known about the biological mechanisms of many of these life-style related factors including using oral contraceptives, having children, and undergoing hormone replacement therapy and how they directly affect the risk of developing breast cancer. In my research I focus on oral contraceptive use and its relation to the relative risk of developing breast cancer when taken at an early age before a woman's first full term pregnancy. Oral contraceptives are the most commonly used method of contraception and the age at first use has been decreasing each year. Many women in their early twenties, before their first full term pregnancy, are now taking hormonal oral contraceptives. Estrogen, a major component of oral contraceptives, is thought to play a role in the increased risk of some cancers, including breast cancer. Research suggests that estrogen may stimulate estrogen receptors and cause cell proliferation to be turned on. With increased proliferation comes the risk of greater mutations in the DNA, which if left unrepaired can lead to neoplastic transformation. Research suggests that cancer initiation begins with the interaction of a carcinogen with mammary tissue that is proliferating at a high rate and is undifferentiated. This type of mammary tissue is seen in younger women who have not experienced a first full term pregnancy. It is not until a woman has experienced a full term pregnancy that the breast tissue is fully differentiated. Pregnancy has been shown to play a protective role against the development of breast cancer. Research suggests that due to the undifferentiated morphology of nulliparous women's breasts that the use of oral contraceptives before a first full term pregnancy does increase their risk of developing breast cancer. The greatest risk group is women who used oral contraceptives for four or more years before their first pregnancy and who were under the age of 30. Additionally women who are carriers of the BRCA mutations are at a greater risk of developing early onset breast cancer compared to women without these mutations. Research shows that oral contraceptive use amplifies the risk of developing breast cancer and that pregnancy offers no protective role in women who are carriers of the BRCA mutations. In conclusion, oral contraceptive use does moderately increase a woman's risk of developing breast cancer when they are taken at a younger age and before a first full term pregnancy.

Patrick Dedrick (2008, T): Marsh 106@3:00 PM

Title: Saké in America: an Investigation of Consumption and Meaning in a Globalized Environment
Major(s): Anthropology
Advisor(s): Mahar


Abstract: Saké, the national beverage of Japan, is growing in popularity around the world – it is now a globalized product. Saké has been closely tied to Japanese history and culture for thousands of years; thus, I believe it to be historically possessive of particular symbolic value and meaning that may have been lost or overshadowed as a necessary convention of globalizing principles. My investigation sets out to determine if such a transformation of meaning has occurred for saké in the American market. Starting with the history of saké, and ending with firsthand interviews with saké producers in America, my research sets out not to provide a statement on the overarching principles of globalization, but rather the particular situation of globalization as it pertains to saké.

Crystal DeFusco (2007, T): Price 202@3:30 PM

Title: Analysis of Nickel Electrodes for Residual Capacity
Major(s): Chemistry
Advisor(s): Whiteley


Abstract: A method for quantifying the Nickel (III) in a nickel electrode was developed using benzyl alcohol as a reducing agent and gas chromatography for analysis. This method was made to replace the current titration method with the goal of providing an easier, more accurate method. The reagents for this procedure have been determined. The percent nickel (III) present in a sample has been plotted over time revealing the correct time frame for collecting data. This method has proven to be precise with a range of one percent nickel (III) and an absolute uncertainty of 1.7 percent. The percent nickel was determined by the standard NASA procedure, and the results compare favorably.

Janelle Del Castillo (2014, T): Berglund 216@1:00 PM

Title: An Evaluation of Pocoyo, a Multimedia Program for Supporting Spanish-Language Acquisition in Preschoolers
Major(s): Education
Advisor(s): Zijdemans Boudreau
Abstract: This study is part of an exploratory research project on the effectiveness of Pocoyo a multimedia product, developed by HITN, that uses iPad games, flash cards, puzzles, story books, and board games to aid in the development of children's native and Spanish language learning. Our project looked particularly at implementing multimedia devices in a preschool learning environment, how teachers can use these devices effectively to support Spanish language acquisition in English-speakers, and the importance of visual and verbal feedback. We were also interested in how the students were interpreting the pictures and word cues shown in the multimedia. The following critical questions guided our research: What are some best practices for using these products to teach native English-speakers Spanish? How effective are the Pocoyo multimedia products for Spanish language learning? Is structured scaffolding versus unstructured learning more effective? What will be the outcome of students learning Spanish from a multimedia device? We did a series of observations at Pacific University's Early Learning Center (ELC) one of the test sites engaged by HNIT. We worked with three focus groups of 4 and 5 year olds over a 12-week period for a total of 8 observations [16 hours]. Data collection was also triangulated through weekly research meetings with our project advisor, and two meetings with the ELC advisor, in the fall and spring semesters. Our research design involved three phases: 1) exploratory; 2) discovery learning; and 3) structured (scaffolded) and unstructured interactions with the tools. Findings will provide feedback to HITN on how to implement their multimedia devices in the classroom and what we learned about Pocoyo's effectiveness as a language program, to help improve and enhance students' ability to improve their literacy and language development.

Joanna Delanty (2009, T): Price 202@9:30 AM

Title: Analysis of Attitudes and Perceptions Towards Physical Education: A Survey of Specialists and Non-Specialists
Major(s): Exercise Science
Advisor(s): Jackson
Abstract: Budget cuts and administrative decisions have made it more common for classroom teachers to teach physical education (PE) rather than employ teachers who are trained PE specialists. Studies have been conducted to compare the performance and outcomes of PE classes taught by specialists versus nonspecialists. Early research has found differences in the classroom structure and organization, as well as willingness to teach PE between these two groups. These differences can have a negative effect on the students’ perceptions of PE and they may not learn the skills needed to maintain lifelong health habits. More recent research by Morgan & Burke (2007) has examined the attitudes that non-PE specialists bring to the PE classroom, but have not compared those attitudes to those from teachers with a PE specialization. Purpose: It is the aim of this study to extend research done by Morgan and Bourke to determine possible differences in attitudes and perceptions towards PE between trained PE specialists and teachers who specialize in another area. Methods: Teachers were recruited via email to take an online survey, which included questions about demographics, the benefits of PE, their attitude toward PE, the barriers of teaching PE, their confidence in teaching PE, and their physical activity level. Analyses: Mean scores were found for each item and then compared between PE and non-PE specialists. Further group analysis by years of experience was completed to compare responses. Results: A significant difference between PE and non-PE specialists was found. PE specialists had a greater level of belief in the benefits, more positive attitudes towards PE, expressed a difference in opinions about barriers, and had a higher level of confidence than non-PE specialists. The level of physical activity was also found to be higher for PE specialists. Conclusion: There are significant differences in the attitudes and perceptions of PE specialists and non-PE specialists. These differences, along with the difference in physical activity levels support a need for trained PE specialists in K-12 education.

Matthew Delegato (2013, P): Price 1st Floor Hallway@1:00 PM

Title: Effect of Extrinsic Rewards on Intrinsic Motivation for Engaging in Physical Activity
Major(s): Exercise Science
Advisor(s): Alstot
Abstract: Research has shown that token reinforcement can be effective in activity settings to increase physical activity behaviors, decrease inappropriate behavior, and improve the learning of motor skills. One of the criticisms of using extrinsic rewards is that they may be potentially detrimental to one's intrinsic motivation for engaging in the activity for which one was extrinsically rewarded. However, there is some conflicting research on the effects of extrinsic rewards on intrinsic motivation. It is also not known whether the motivation for engaging in physically strenuous activities can increase in a person with initially low levels of intrinsic motivation after being extrinsically rewarded via a token economy. Purpose: This study will examine the effects of a token economy administered on a fixed rate (FR) schedule of reinforcement on physical activity behaviors in participants who have an initially low intrinsic motivation for engaging in physical activity. Intrinsic motivation will also be measured before and after the intervention to assess the extrinsic rewards' impact on motivation for engaging in physical activity. Method: College aged participants over 18 years of age were asked to ride a stationary bike for 10 sessions of 20 minutes. During baseline sessions, subjects rode for 20 minutes with no external reward. Mean revolutions per minute (RPM) for each session were calculated. Once a stable baseline pattern emerged, the token economy was introduced. During the token economy phase, a token was awarded for every minute participants rode at a level at least 10% above their mean baseline RPM, allowing participants to earn up to 20 tokens per session. These tokens were then exchanged for gift cards from the "token store". Data Analysis: Mean RPM for baseline and token phases were plotted on a graph and inspected for response differentiation. The Situational Motivational Scale (SIMS) was administered to participants before and after the intervention to assess changes in intrinsic motivation. Results & Conclusions: The results from this study and any conclusions made will be presented on senior projects day.

Rebecca Dellinger (2007, T): Marsh LL21@9:30 AM

Title: The Portrayal of Women's Sexuality through Popular Magazines
Major(s): Sociology
Advisor(s): Phillips


Abstract: The popular press defines boundaries for what is considered a "normal" and "healthy" sexuality for young women. Women's magazines, in particular, suggest that anyone one who does not fall within these margins is "abnormal" or "sexually deviant". Research has shown the influence of advertising in popular magazines on young women's self image, but little research has been done to acknowledge the importance of the articles within these magazines. Articles may be more likely to be interpreted as "fact" by readers who can be savvy about advertising. Through a content analysis of the popular magazines Cosmopolitan and Glamour, this project shows what the popular press presents as normal sexuality for young women and considers what the consequences of these definitions might be for women.

K'rene Delplanche (2013, T): Price 202@4:30 PM

Title: Influences of Hip Extensor Resistance Training on Jumping and Landing Kinetics
Major(s): Exercise Science
Advisor(s): Schot
Abstract: Rupture of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is a common injury among athletes in sport, especially among females. Most are classified as non-contact mechanism, meaning the injury arose from a high-impact force, such as in landing, but not from a collision with another person or object. Many assert that the major cause for non-contact ACL injuries is a strength imbalance where the hip extensor muscles (hamstring and gluteus maximus, located at the back of the thigh and rump) are weak as compared to the knee extensors (quadriceps, located at the front of the thigh). This strength imbalance may influence landing strategies in ways that increase injury susceptibility. Strengthening the hip extensors may protect the ACL. Purpose: To determine the effects of an 11-week hip extensor resistance training program on kinetic patterns during landing and jumping, with a special emphasis on landing features commonly associated with injury risk. Methods: 10 adult women volunteered to participate in our specialized resistance training program. Investigator-supervised training was conducted three times a week. Exercise intensity was progressively and systematically increased over the course of the program. Participants performed isokinetic strength testing, single legged drop landings, and countermovement vertical jumps prior to and every week throughout the training period. Analysis: The effects of this training program on strength, landing, and jumping tests were evaluated via repeated measures ANOVA. Results: Findings will be provided at the time of the presentation.

Christian Demko (2011, T): Library Conference@11:30 AM

Title: Contradictory Elements Arisen from Dewey's Quest for Uncertainty
Major(s): Philosophy
Advisor(s): Boersema
Abstract: John Dewey's Quest for Uncertainty and Education and Experience are both works by the 20th century pragmatist that focus on trying to redefine the fundamental philosophies that back our theories of knowledge and theories of education, respectively. However, when looking deeper into the underlying framework upon which Dewey reconstructs these philosophical theories, I propose that Dewey betrays his own dislike for a bimodal system of thought. Through one of his own reconstructions in Quest, by which he means to rid philosophers of a bimodal system for understanding knowledge, he unintentionally creates another of these systems in its stead. After bringing this contradiction to light, I attempt to return to the theory of knowledge developed in Quest, applying an alternative method of understanding knowledge, or the acquisition of, and its implications.

Christian Demko (2011, T): Marsh 201@9:30 AM

Title: Psychobiography of Elliott Smith, Part 1
Major(s): Psychology
Advisor(s): Schultz
Abstract: Part one of a five part group psychobiography of the brilliant and doomed Portland songwriter Elliott Smith. Includes a biographical overview of Smith's life and death; discussion of the meaning and purpose of psychobiography as a form of psychological research; and initial ideas emerging out of an attachment-based interpretation of Smith's psychology and creativity.

Saori Den (2010, T): Library Conference@10:00 AM

Title: Five Years: Photographic Dictionary
Major(s): Art
Advisor(s): Flory
Abstract: It has been almost five years since I began college and photography has been a significant tool for me ever since, to figure out and understand myself as an individual with creative mind. It is my attempt to preserve transitory moments in our lives that I would never want to leave behind. My senior project consists of photographs and definitions, which I call “Photographic Dictionary.” This project is dedicated to my late mother, who loved a song “Five Years” by David Bowie.

Meiyin Deng (2010, T): McGill Auditorium@2:00 PM

Title: Cost Benefit Analysis of Substance Abuse Treatment
Major(s): Economics
Advisor(s): Haag
Abstract: Drug abuse incurs tremendous economic and social costs to American society in terms of increasing crime rates, loss of productivity, and welfare dependency. Recently, federal policy towards drug abuse has focused on two strategies: supply reduction through interdiction and domestic law enforcement, and demand reduction through prevention and treatment. However, national policy has primarily focused on supply reduction. The over-emphasis of law enforcement programs is the result of strong public demand for severe punishment of crimes. The costs and benefits of different anti-drug policies require careful assessment. Several studies have examined the effect of substance abuse treatment (SAT) on crime and employment; however, there is no consensus on their benefit. This study provides an empirical examination of the benefits of SAT using data from National Treatment Improvement Evaluation Study (NTIES). A multiple regression analysis was conducted to examine the hypothesis that substance abuse treatment can cost-effectively reduce crime, dependency on welfare programs, and unemployment.

Kristen Dever (2012, T): Price 202@11:30 AM

Title: Effects of a Sports Training Flooring Prototype on Drop-Jump Tibial Acceleration
Major(s): Exercise Science
Advisor(s): Schot
Abstract: Plyometrics are gaining popularity as a training method for increasing vertical jump height particularly and power for explosive movements generally. Exercises include several cycles of jumping and landing in a variety of conditions, including from elevated heights, over obstacles, and over distance. Drop-jumping, where the athlete drops from an elevated platform, lands on the floor, jumps up with maximal effort, and then lands once again, is perhaps the most common method. Because multiple repetitions are performed within a bout, the body incurs repeated stresses. This can increase injury risk. As an offset, resilient mats designed for plyometric training aim to dissipate a portion of these forces to reduce the stress and lower injury rates. While injury protection is a key issue, sacrificing performance is not. Therefore, an ideal product would decrease the risk of injury without causing a decrease in performance. Purpose: To evaluate select drop-jump performance characteristics executed on two thicknesses (1.3 and 1.9 cm) of a resilient floor material prototype for plyometric training. Methods: 24 women performed 30 45cm drop-jumps on each of three separate days. Day 1 included testing on a force plate with and without the material covers, while wearing an accelerometer attached to the tibia. Days 2 and 3 included testing on a wooden gym floor or a concrete floor, also with and without each material cover. Testing order was counterbalanced. Analysis: The effects of the activity surface substrate (force platform, wood, concrete) and cover material (none, and 1.3 and 1.9 cm of the prototype) on select features of drop-jump performances were assessed via 3 x 3 factorial ANOVA with repeated measures. Results: Findings will be discussed at the time of the presentation.

Leland ] Devlin (2013, T): Taylor Auditorium: Marsh 216@3:30 PM

Title: The Media's Effect on High School Athletes
Major(s): Media Arts
Advisor(s): Cassady
Abstract: There are many trends concerning the amount of media attention high schools athletes are receiving today. This project examines the possible benefits or consequences that media hype creates for those who participate in sports. Sports and the media have sustained a symbiotic relationship since their existence in American culture. To answer the question of what effects the media can have on high school athletes the project looks at the history and role sports and media have had on American society. Looking at the history of the sports/media relationship from the mid eighteen hundreds until today, it assesses the positive and/or negative effects of the sports/media relationship on high school athletes and predict its influence on future generations.

Jennifer Di Nocenzo (2011, T): Taylor Auditorium: Marsh 216@8:30 AM

Title: Massage Website
Major(s): Media Arts: General Media
Advisor(s): Cassady
Abstract: Massage Therapist Daniel Carson is looking for a way to expand his business. He and Chiropractor Ann Lauzon are in need of a tool that will get its message out to the public about their business. This project was to design a website that will show potential clients the kind of techniques that they offer. The website will provide a resource for people who know show very little about therapeutic massage by providing links to other sites that provide in-depth explanations of the techniques and their uses, the benefits of those techniques and related services. It will also display unique side of the chiropractic business. Ann Lauzon, along with her regular chiropractic work on humans, also provides chiropractic services for animals.

Kristen Dick (2013, T): Strain 121@9:00 AM

Title: Genetic differences in the Heat Shock Protein 70 (HSP70) gene between populations of bed bugs, Cimex lectularius, exposed to different thermal stresses
Major(s): Biology
Advisor(s): Schnorr
Abstract: Bed bugs, Cimex lectularius, are flightless insect pests that feed off the blood of human hosts. There has been a sudden resurgence of these pests due in part to their newly evolved resistance to the most commonly used insecticides. Now the current method of extermination is by the thermal heating of rooms and belongings. Such heat treatments could also lead to the selection of thermal tolerance, and there is an established link between HSP70 and thermal tolerance in many organisms. To investigate the possibility of thermal tolerance in Pacific bed bugs, we used the Polymerase Chain Reaction technique to amplify the bed bug HSP70 gene. Amplified DNA was then sent to Eurofins MGW Operon for sequencing. HSP70 DNA sequence of bed bugs exposed to thermal stress was compared to DNA sequence from bed bugs that had not been exposed to such stress. Between the two populations, there was no difference in the DNA sequence of the HSP70 gene. These findings contribute to our understanding of pest control strategies and can be used to improve our management of this blood-sucking insect.

Nicole Dickison (2007, T): Price 202@2:00 PM

Title: Evolutionary Analysis of Cytochrome P450 in Paddlefish and Sturgeon
Major(s): Bioinformatics
Advisor(s): Sardinia


Abstract: The protein cytochrome P450 is found in nearly all living organisms. It is an important protein involved in detoxification of chemicals. It is unknown if paddlefish have the gene for this important protein, but prior studies have found no cytochrome P450 protein activity in paddlefish cells. A closely related fish, sturgeon, clearly has the enzymatic activity. The polymerase chain reaction was used to determine if paddlefish contain the gene for cytochrome P450. Evolutionary trees using DNA sequences from publicly available databases were constructed to analyze the relationship between paddlefish and sturgeon and to demonstrate the evolution of the cytochrome P450 gene over time in various organisms.

Katianne Dickson (2010, T): Marsh 201@11:30 AM

Title: Beyond the Octagon: A Qualitative Study of Mixed Martial Artists
Major(s): Sociology
Advisor(s): Whitehead
Abstract: Mixed Martial Arts (MMA), more commonly known as cage fighting, is a sport that has a deep-rooted history in violence, blood, and brawls. With the sport’s recent explosion, several questions have arisen about participants in the sport. However, very little research has been conducted on these individuals outside of what goes on inside the cage. By conducting in-depth, open-ended interviews, coupled with extensive analysis of the sociology of emotions, the sociology of sports, and masculinities studies, I explain how MMA fighters deal with their emotions beyond the octagon in which they compete. My research has showed that the men who participate in this sport deal with their emotions differently based upon factors including: their anticipated length of commitment of the sport, their level of current commitment, and their success in the cage.

Juana Diego (2008, T): McGill Auditorium@4:30 PM

Title: Economic Impact of Immigration on the United States: A Series of Stories
Major(s): Media Arts
Advisor(s): Cassady


Abstract: Research done through interviews with immigration lawyers, judges, economists, Department of Homeland Security and Border Protection personnel, as well as academic sources, shows that immigration plays a big role in the United State’s economy. This is a time when citizens are concerned that immigration, specifically illegal immigration, is draining the country’s economy. Through a series of newspaper articles, research shows that the economic impact of immigration can be found in many sectors of our country; such sectors include the educational systems, the labor market as well as the international relations that America has. Interviews with locals in the community will give a view of how Washington County’s economy has been influenced by immigration.

Kristen Dierick (2014, T): Marsh 106@1:30 PM

Title: "Head First" Post-Concussive Syndrome Among College Students
Major(s): Psychology
Advisor(s): Island
Abstract: The incidence and prevalence of mild traumatic brain injury is increasing. Currently, traumatic brain injury occurs at least 1.7 million times a year in North America. Concussions are characterized by a traumatically induced alteration in mental status not necessarily resulting in loss of consciousness. Memory and attention are the most sensitive mechanisms following a traumatic brain injury, especially those areas responsible for information processing and working memory. There is also evidence of deficiencies in both phonemic and semantic fluency among individuals who have sustained a concussion. The affect of a head injury on visual process is varied, some documented symptoms include: visual perception loss in all or specific regions of the field, loss of oculomotor function, diplopia, and reduced binocular fusion. Attitudes toward contact sports have changed more towards high impact rather than safety over the years, leading to higher incidences of sports-related concussions within the last half-decade. However, athletes are not the only population affected by concussion; those within the general population are also susceptible to head injury. Professors are not always privy to students' physical challenges in the classroom this is especially true if a student recently incurred a mild head injury. Similarly, students are often unaware that there are a number of accommodations or adjustments that could be made to help them succeed in their courses. This study examines the holistic effects of brain injury within a college student population and ways in which faculty may help support those students.

Erich Dieziger (2014, T): Berglund 145@2:00 PM

Title: M-Rated Video Games: A Newsprint Media Frame Analysis
Major(s): Politics and Government
Advisor(s): Van Dyk
Abstract: The discourse over mature rated video games is fraught with controversy, with a myriad of different political and cultural ramifications. This thesis seeks to answer how M-rated video games are portrayed in American newsprint media. Through identifying and coding frames from 400 separate news articles issued by five major American publications, this research shows that American newsprint media most often conveys a negative view of games. From 1998 to 2013, negative interpretations comprised of more than 50% of all newspaper coverage. The government is the most cited source in stories on video games. The thesis suggests that M-rated videogames media coverage of video games may contribute to a culture which believes it is easier to regulate M-rated games, rather than taking personal or parental responsibility to learn about game content before playing.

Phillip Do (2012, P): Strain Hall 2nd Floor@1:00 PM

Title: The effects of catecholamine stress hormones on gastrointestinal commensal bacteria population
Major(s): Biology
Advisor(s): Scholnick
Abstract: Gastrointestinal commensal bacteria are known to aid in digestion, increased nutrition uptake, and elevated immune function. Recent research suggests that elevated levels of stress hormones may be linked to significant changes in the population of commensal bacteria within the GI tract and increased susceptibility to infections. For my capstone project, I reviewed recent research that examined the potential changes in commensal bacteria due to catecholamine stress hormone exposure and examined probable mechanisms that stimulate typically beneficial bacteria to become pathogenic. Elevated catecholamines due to chronic stress appear to stimulate bacterial sequestration of iron which may ultimately trigger elevated microbial populations and transformation from a commensal to a pathogenic state. Transferrin and lactoferrin are antimicrobial molecules that typically sequester iron and prevent bacteria from obtaining free-floating iron molecules. At high concentrations, norepinephrine forms a complex with transferrin and lactoferrin causing the release of the iron and elevated iron availability for bacterial utilization. Bacteria uptake iron from the environment by utilizing iron scavenger peptides called siderophores. The availability of iron allows bacteria to accelerate growth and ultimately leads to pathogenic transformations. However, the exact mechanism bacteria use to transform from a commensal to a pathogenic state is currently unresolved. A better understanding of the catecholamine-bacteria iron utilization pathway may help better elucidate the link between stress and disease and may provide valuable information to help improve public health.

Georgia Doerr (2009, T): Strain 121@9:30 AM

Title: Residues of DDT Found in Local Compost
Major(s): Environmental Studies
Advisor(s): Gundersen
Abstract: Persistent Pesticides are harmful to the environment because of their toxicity and their potential to bioaccumulate. Because of these risks, persistent pesticides are either banned for use in the United States or highly regulated by the government. However, the United States imports a substantial amount of its food from other countries in order to have a large selection of produce year round. The imported foods are often from developing nations that have different environmental standards than the United States especially regarding the use of pesticides. Composting food waste has become a common practice in the United States as it can be used as a natural fertilizer in organic farming. Recently, it has become a concern that compost containing waste from food imported from developing countries, could contain persistent pesticides. This study is the analysis of compost and how it could be a potential source of DDT and other persistent pesticides. Samples were taken from the B-Street Permaculture Project compost and extracted using acteonitrile as a solvent. Each sample was filtered using Florisil filters and analyzed on a gas chromatograph for the presence of 17 pesticides including DDT. Traces of DDT and were found in the samples. This study explores the environmental impacts of persistent pesticides and the significance of finding them in compost.

Lauren Dolgner (2011, P): Strain Hall 3rd Floor@3:00 PM

Title: CD133+ in conjunction with CD10+ fibroblasts will create malignant tumors when found in human colon cancer cells
Major(s): Biology
Advisor(s): Schnorr
Abstract: The Cancer Stem Cell Hypothesis states that specialized cancer cells, known as cancer stem cells, are at the root of cancer's ability to metastasize to foreign regions of the body. These specialized cells share the characteristics of immortality and indefinite replication with normal stem cells and are thus extremely difficult to eliminate from the body. Researchers have thus begun to look for specific markers for these cells so they can be targeted for destruction. If the cells can be eliminated from the tumor, then the tumor loses its ability to metastasize and is left as a benign group of cells. The research I am proposing is based on research done by Cui et al. (2010) in which they investigated the potential colon cancer stem cell marker CD133 and its associations with fibroblasts containing CD10. I propose to extend their research by using human colon cancer cells in a mouse model. I intend to show that CD133 is a viable candidate for a colon cancer stem cell marker by showing that colon cancer cells that contain CD133 are more likely to grow large tumors at an increased rate compared to CD133- colon cancer cells.

Liza Dombrowsky (2007, T): Marsh 201@1:00 PM

Title: Life on the Periphery: Negotiating Identity in Northeast Portland as Experienced by Immigrants from French-speaking Africa
Major(s): Anthropology
Advisor(s): Mahar


Abstract: Based on ethnographic data gathered in Northeast Portland, this study provides an in-depth look at Francophone African immigrant identity and the cultural landscape of Northeast Portland. It argues that, for my informants, personal identity formation involves an intermingling of ethnicity, personal history and lived experience. It refutes the notion that each language embodies a single, unique worldview and attests to Mikhail Bakhtin's theory of the hybridity of language. My research provides a template for how Francophone African immigrants construct their identity as residents in the United States that could be applied to NGO program development in Portland, aimed at facilitating the transition of immigration.

Jason Dondero (2007, T): Marsh 212@9:00 AM

Title: Response to Internment: Cooperation Verses Resistance in the Japanese American Community during World War II
Major(s): History
Advisor(s): Barlow


Abstract: In the aftermath of Pearl Harbor, Japanese Americans on the West Coast found themselves under suspicion of subversive activities by the government, media, and general public, despite little evidence supporting this claim. Under Executive Order 9066, issued in February 1942, President Roosevelt authorized the internment of Japanese immigrants (Issei, who were non-citizens) and their children (Nisei, who were born in the U.S. and therefore citizens) in concentration camps under the doctrine of military necessity. While initially preventing internees from serving in the military, the United States government reinstituted the draft for those citizens of Japanese descent in 1943, and many Japanese-American men answered the call for military service. Only a small minority resisted military service, despite the discriminatory treatment they had received by the government. The issue of military service versus draft resistance reflects the general trend of acceptance and cooperation by a majority of the Japanese-American community during the internment. Utilizing interviews, oral histories, and accounts of both cooperation with the government and limited resistance movements, this paper will examine why so few Japanese Americans actively resisted the internment, while many displayed active patriotism in their military service and support of the war. The main purpose here is to contrast the experience and decision-making process of the small groups of resisters with those who felt supporting the war and accepting their fate in the camps would do more to improve their position in American society than protesting. My contention is that in both types of responses, Japanese Americans' actions challenged the common assumption that they were not well assimilated into American culture and society. Ironically, the history of discrimination against the Japanese-American community before World War II had accelerated this process, and in their contrasting reactions to the internment, second-generation Japanese Americans had already shown how truly integrated they had become into the only country they had known.

Josef Donlin (2010, T): Price 203@2:00 PM

Title: The Importance of Chemosensory Navigation to Avians and Arthropods
Major(s): Biology
Advisor(s): Scholnick
Abstract: Animals utilize a variety of navigational systems to increase foraging and reproductive success. The physiological systems that allow animal navigation to be possible are crucial for avian and arthropod survival. Without navigational systems, animals would be unable to exhibit homing. The ability of many animals to find mates is heavily dependant on navigation. Of the variety of navigational systems available to a given species, some systems are less dispensable than others. Chemosensory navigation assists predators while tracking prey. Chemosensory navigation also allows for the reception of pheromone trails. Scent is a key factor in finding food for many avians and arthropods. In my senior capstone project I will examine the importance of chemosensory navigational systems to avian and arthropod foraging and reproductive success.

Rose Donohoue (2008, T): Price 203@10:00 AM

Title: Extensions to Modeling and Acid Dependency in the Evelyn Effect
Major(s): Chemistry
Advisor(s): Currie


Abstract: The dehydration of 2-methylcyclohexanol in acid has become commonly used in organic chemistry laboratories. The changing product ratio during the distillation, known as the Evelyn effect, provides a chance for students to engage in a thought-provoking discussion on what mechanism is utilized in the formation of these products and what influences product ratios. This study is an extension of computational modeling and experimental results reported by Rachel Anderson and Melissa Fiedler in Pacific University senior theses. New modeling expands on previous work by including solvent effects. Thermodynamic data were collected in order to determine which pathway is most competitive: E1 or E2 for the cis and trans isomers. The experimental approach focuses on determining the role of acid in the dehydration. Acids with various pKa's were studied to identify if the product ratios depend upon the acidity.

Justin Donovan (2007, T): Library Conference@8:30 AM

Title: Mood Congruency as a Function of Emotion and Priming
Major(s): Psychology
Advisor(s): Schultz
Kleinknecht

Abstract: The understanding of mood-congruency is important for assessing whether natural mood-states, such as depression, can be influenced externally so that they can be properly treated. The more we know about the interaction between memory and emotions, the closer we will be to helping those in need of emotional help. In my study, I tested the unconscious memory of my participants after inducing one of three moods: positive, negative, and neutral. Each participant was primed with words that are also either positive, negative, or neutral. The participants were then given cue words and asked to produce as many one-word associations as possible. The related primed words recalled were then recorded. The following hypotheses were made: (a) Positive mood-induced participants will recall more positive words than negative words; (b) Negative mood-induced participants will recall more negative words than positive words; (c) Neutral mood-sustained participants will show no difference; (d) Primed words will be recalled more than unprimed words.

Kathryn Dressler (2010, T): Berglund 200@9:30 AM

Title: Attempting to Remember: A Collection of Creative Work
Major(s): English: Creative Writing
Advisor(s): Johnson
Postma
Abstract: What does it mean to remember?  How does someone trust a memory?  Creative non-fiction revolves around a description or representation of a subject which is always presented as the truth.  Authors David Sedaris and Annie Dillard often challenge the regulations of creative non-fiction through depictions of intimate experiences described in an unrealistic manner.  Sedaris describes his newly purchased washer and dryer congratulating him for no longer having to use the Laundromat, while Dillard depicts a pack of tourists dancing like ancient natives in the shadow of an eclipse.  Neither scene is entirely factual, but there is truth to both portrayals. Are Sedaris and Dillard stretching the truth?  The collection of creative non-fiction essays included in my thesis explores the idea of memory and whether truth is a subjective word. 

Robbie Dressler (2010, T): Berglund 200@3:00 PM

Title: The Awakening through Time: How Societal Changes Influence Literary Perception
Major(s): English: Literature
Advisor(s): Steele
Abstract: Kate Chopin’s The Awakening was dismissed by critics and readers alike after its initial publishing in 1899.  Chopin’s narrative of a young woman seeking identity and meaning outside of her traditional role as the “mother woman” caused moral indignation in the literary world, as evidenced by its negative reviews and poor sales.  Except for a few minor mentions, The Awakening disappeared from the public sphere until its rediscovery by several critics in the 1950’s and early 60’s. With its gradual acceptance into the literary canon, The Awakening has been interpreted in many different ways. Most critics emphasize the feminist aspects of the novel, while others argue the real meaning can be found through the transcendentalist themes in the tradition of Ralph Waldo Emerson and Walt Whitman. This thesis explores how changes in society are reflected in literary criticism, using The Awakening as an example.

Joshua Drew (2011, T): Berglund 232@11:30 AM

Title: Brutal Unity
Major(s): Sociology
Advisor(s): Whitehead
Abstract: It has been said that you can learn a lot about people by listening to the songs that mean something to them. When applied to "metal heads", this notion would lead you to believe that those who listen to metal live for violence, anger, and possibly even Devil worship. After having been involved in the metal culture during my high school and early college years myself, I can say with a high degree of certainty that there is much more to metal than loud music and scary looking musicians. Émile Durkheim believed that rituals played an important role in separating everyday life from periods of sacred celebrations. These rituals, which were behaviors designed to recreate specific feelings, ultimately helped to strengthen the bonds between people during these celebrations. Metal music venues provide a location for individuals to come together and experience solidarity through use of rituals, which I define as actions or behaviors commonly found at metal shows, such as moshing. By conducting interviews with metal fans and observing metal shows first hand, I intend to show how solidarity between individuals at metal shows can be established through the use of rituals.

Jesse Dubay (2009, T): Price 204@3:00 PM

Title: The Pergola Project: An Online Game Creation Tool
Major(s): Computer Science
Advisor(s): Williams
Abstract: The Pergola Project is a web application designed to make the process of online game creation accessible to a larger audience. Pergola allows users to build multiplayer turn-based strategy games, like chess and Battleship, which are then played in a browser without the installation of any additional software. Depending on the game, players can invite any number of their friends to compete with them online. Traditionally, game development requires the developers to hand-type the computer codes necessary to define the game -- a tedious and error-prone process. Pergola breaks tradition by providing a game editor in which developers use a drag-and-drop interface to define game components, such as rules, pieces, board regions, and instructions. These components snap together in a logical and intuitive manner, resulting in a simpler interface than the traditional game development method.

Emily Dueker (2011, T): Berglund 230@9:00 AM

Title: Water, Water Everywhere: A Portrait Series of Water
Major(s): Art
Advisor(s): Flory
Abstract: This project is a photographic look at water as both a subject for escape and intimacy. Using different techniques like slow shutter speeds and panoramas, portraits of water have been created to show its intricacies as well as the qualities that allow a viewer to lose themselves in an image. The idea of permanent and impermanent art is explored through the designing of a 21 month calendar which allows for the use of commercial-type photography and the fine art setting of the gallery show for senior artwork. All of the proceeds from any sales of the calendar or works in the gallery will go directly to Charity: Water, an organization dedicated to building wells in third world nations where clean water is scarce.

Kevin Duffy (2013, P): Strain Hall 2nd Floor@3:00 PM

Title: Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPAR-γ) and its effects on the Cardiovascular system
Major(s): Biology
Advisor(s): Rynd
Abstract: Cardiovascular disease is one of the leading causes of death in the United States. Studying the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease is, therefore, essential for the possible alleviation of such cases. Further knowledge could lead to more effective drug treatment. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPAR-γ ) is a nuclear receptor found in vascular-associated cells such as endothelial cells, macrophages, and vascular smooth muscle cells. Its role in cardiovascular pathogenesis has garnered great interest in recent years. Nonsense mutation studies show that PPAR-γ is essential for normal vascular function. Some studies even suggest that increased activation of PPAR-γ improves vascular function in dysfunctional states such as hypertension. However, some studies question PPAR-γ 's role and even suggest that it may play a negative role in some cardiovascular diseases, such as atherosclerosis. The overall evidence currently suggests that PPAR-γ is a potential target for agonists in combating cardiovascular disease, yet it is still unclear whether or not PPAR-γ has potentially negative effects on cardiovascular health when it is up-regulated.

Veronica Duman (2011, T): Library Conference@2:00 PM

Title: Character Development of a Young CPA
Major(s): Philosophy
Advisor(s): Ilea
Abstract: In philosophy we are taught to seek the truth. We try to find a way to come to some form of understanding that encompasses our experiences as a cohesive whole or on the individual level. Philosophy is a rational activity that unifies or integrates our experiences to some form of intelligible view that can be related to whatever one may find. In my pursuit of truth and understanding, I took a deeper look at the auditor's judgment in accounting as to what is emphasized in school and compared to what is going on in the industry. I also analyzed what ought to be emphasized in school. With the increasing emphasis of ethics in accounting, there is continued pressure for more regulation and change, yet the fundamental issue of character is no longer being addressed. I will show that what accounting needs is further character development (virtue ethics) instead of better regulations. The current technical educational requirements are not enough to develop young and future certified public accountants (CPAs) to handle real world experiences for application of ethics to the field of accounting. With the implications of IFRS being integrated into the US, this principle based system will require CPAs to be able to apply ethical concepts to new situations, while exhibiting the highest standard of ethical principles in order to do their job. Accountants fall short of application of virtue ethics to current events of today, and what is required for educational purposes.

Esther Dunbar (2011, T): Marsh 101@12:00 PM

Title: The Green Sheen: Are Attitudes REALLY Predictive of Proenvironmental Behavior?
Major(s): Psychology
Advisor(s): Island
Abstract: The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between proenvironmental orientation and environmentally sustainable behavior. Although global warming and environmental degradation are empirically recognized problems and educational efforts have increased public awareness of the issues, programs have been modestly successful in promoting more sustainable behavior. According to Goldsmith and Godfrey's (1975) necessary conditions of promoting behavioral change, individuals must be aware that the issue is actually or potentially harmful to personal health and welfare. They must be informed on what can be done to solve the problem, and feel that benefits outweigh the costs of behavioral change. Individuals must also feel concerned about the hazardous condition and believe that this action will have a meaningful impact on the environment. Further, relative to the theory of planned behavior, intentions capture the motivational factors that influence behavior, indicating how much effort people are willing to commit in performing a behavior (Ajzen, 1991; Bamberg, Ajzen, & Schmidt, 2003). Participants were observed encountering a plastic bottle on a path. They were coded either leaving the bottle, or picking it up for recycling, a sustainable behavior. Participants then completed a series of surveys, including the New Ecological Paradigm, a knowledge questionnaire, an adapted amotivation scale, a behavioral self-report, the Narcissistic Personality Inventory-16 and the NEO Five Factor Inventory.

James Duncan (2014, T): Taylor Auditorium: Marsh 216@9:30 AM

Title: Manuheali'i: Online Presence Design and Implementation
Major(s): Media Arts: Integrated Media
Advisor(s): Geraci
Abstract: I designed and created the web site for a family-owned clothing company in Hawai'i called Manuheali'i. This website is designed to support and enhance the users' desire to purchase Manuheali'i products by providing a clean and elegant visual design to the e-commerce site. Beyond my improvements to the website, I developed print materials and a new brand identity with updated colors, typography and logo design. There is a clear relationship between all of these deliverables that captures the essence of who Manuheali'i is and the culture of Hawai'i. In my presentation, I will discuss the processes I used in planning, designing and implementing the site and new visual identity.

Desiree Dung (2013, P): Strain Hall 3rd Floor@3:00 PM

Title: Epigenetic influences of reelin and bdnf genes in patients with schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and major depression
Major(s): Biology
Advisor(s): Sardinia
Abstract: When human beings are born, their environments start to cause indirect genetic effects. These modifications of different genes are due to epigenetic effects. Epigenetic tags alter gene expression by adding or removing methyl groups to DNA. This project addresses the question: What is the role of gene methylation in the genes reelin and bdnf on patients with schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and major depression? Patients who were diagnosed with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder saw a decreased level of methylation in the gene reelin. Patients who suffered from major depression saw a decreased level of methylation in the gene bdnf. Anti-depressants were able to increase the methylation level in the bdnf gene. Clearly, there are biological factors associated with a mental illness. An awareness of the environmental factors that cause epigenetic changes may improve treatment of mental illnesses.

Sarah Dunn (2011, T): Price 203@9:30 AM

Title: Nestling health and its relation to plants with volatile compounds used as nesting material in three species of Oregon Chickadees (Poecile spp.)
Major(s): Biology
Advisor(s): Lopez
Abstract: Several species of birds, including the Blue tit (Cyanistes caeruleus), have been observed choosing plants with volatile compounds to use as nesting material. One of the hypotheses proposed is that the compounds offer a fitness benefit to the nestlings. Experimental evidence has supported this, although the exact mechanism and benefits are still unclear. This proposed research will examine the relationship between plant species used as nesting material by three species of Chickadees (Poecile atricapillus, Poecile gambeli and Poecile rufescens) and the fitness benefits to nestlings. Chickadees and Blue tits are both in the family Paridae; my research will be a comparative study between these birds as well as novel observations of volatile compound use in Chickadees. My research will focus on the presence of volatile compounds in the plant material and the effects of these compounds on the number and development of nest bacteria and ectoparasites. My research will determine if the birds are using plants with volatile compounds as nesting material, and if they are choosing these species at random or preferentially. I will test for fitness benefits to the nestlings from these compounds by measuring chick mortality, mass, feather development and fledgling rate. I will also test the effects of the volatile compounds on the development and mortality of common nest ectoparasites and on the number and species richness of bacteria on the chicks and in the nest. My predicted results are that these birds are choosing plants with volatile compounds to use as nesting material; that chicks raised in nests with volatile compounds have higher fitness as measured by mortality, mass, feather development and fledgling rate; and that volatile compounds have a negative effect on both ectoparasite development and bacterial infection and species richness.

Jeanine Duong (2013, P): Strain Hall 2nd Floor@11:00 AM

Title: Feasibility of the use of the entomopathogenic fungi Beauveria bassiana as a means of biological control
Major(s): Biology
Advisor(s): Halpern
Abstract: Alternate methods of pest control have been researched for decades in order to find safer and more environmentally friendly alternatives for chemical pesticides. One of these areas of research lies with the use of entomopathogenic fungi as a means of pest control for crops. Beauveria bassiana is one of the most thoroughly researched of these fungi due to its plasticity and virulence to several hundred species of crop insects. There is evidence that B. bassiana can cause significant damage to pest populations if the right isolates are used and, in some cases, there is 100% mortality of the target insect. To apply it to a field of crops, the formula of the B. bassiana conidia suspension may be altered to allow for greatest survival rate of the fungus. Unlike with chemical pesticides, application of B. bassiana has also proven to have less of an impact on the health of consumers and also the environment. Although it may never completely replace chemical pesticides, B. bassiana shows great promise due to its efficacy, feasible application, and low impact on human and environmental health.

Kendra Durdel (2010, T): Price 203@11:00 AM

Title: Investigating The Decline Of The American Kestrel (Falco Sparverius) In North America
Major(s): Environmental Studies: Environmental Biology
Advisor(s): Van Buskirk
Abstract: The American Kestrel, the smallest member of the falcon family in North America, is facing dramatic population declines in several regions within its range. Environmental stressors found in the eastern United States, such as population booms of potential predators, agricultural pollution by farmers, and habitat degradation, have been implicated in these declines. Because agricultural and land use practices have maintained large amounts of open space that produce abundant prey, western Washington County provides suitable habitat that currently supports a healthy population of kestrels. Land use and farming practices are, however, subject to change in ways that could introduce problems for this kestrel population similar to those observed elsewhere in the Unites States. In order to stress the importance of this species and its susceptibility to changes in the landscape, I spoke to local farmers about kestrels and how they can benefit from protecting the birds' habitat. Through person-to-person contact and the creation of informative brochures, I was able to communicate the need for protection of kestrel habitat and the threat posed by harmful pesticide/herbicide use. In doing this, I hope to increase awareness of Washington County's kestrels in order to educate the public about the importance of ­­conserving a species that plays a significant role in the natural food chain.

Jaqui Dureg (2012, T): Berglund 232@10:30 AM

Title: Nonviolent Communication in the Elementary School
Major(s): Education
Advisor(s): Phillips
Abstract: This senior project describes the introduction of Rosenberg's (2003) four components of Nonviolent Communication (NVC) to the grade 3-6 students of Forest Grove Community School (FGCS). NVC is a four-step process of conflict resolution that includes 1) observation without evaluation, 2) identifying and expressing feelings, 3) discovering our needs, and 4) making requests. Teacher-researchers delivered lessons to students once a week over a series of five weeks, targeting each NVC component. Teacher-researchers collected data during each session, including observations of lessons and in other school settings, worksheets, surveys, pictures, video and audio recordings, and pre/post assessments of student learning. Data were collected and analyzed over a five-week period. Themes found while transcribing and analyzing data include a) the student's definition and identification of conflict compared to the teacher-researcher's views, b) disconnection of knowledge about NVC and its application, c) the importance of an underlying culture of trust in effective NVC. These themes were presented to the FGCS principal and teachers, to help them determine their next plan of action toward developing a system for conflict resolution.

Stephanie Dureg (2013, T): Taylor Auditorium: Marsh 216@3:00 PM

Title: Online Presence for Karma Day Spa & Salon
Major(s): Media Arts
Advisor(s): Geraci
Abstract: Karma Day Spa & Salon is a small town and locally owned all-in-one-stop-shop, which was named Forest Grove Reader's Choice: Best New Business; one of the five awards they received in 2012. I have designed and created the web site and print brochure for the spa, all of which were developed with the average spa user in mind. The main goal of this site is to strengthen Karma's web presence, as well as making a more unified brand identity. In my presentation, I will discuss the process of designing, developing, and implementing these new assets for Karma Day Spa & Salon.

John Duro (2009, T): Price 203@9:30 AM

Title: Oral Bacterial Interaction and Its Role in the Inhibition of Streptococcus Mutans
Major(s): Biology
Advisor(s): Schnorr
Abstract: The consumption of carbohydrates combined with limited oral hygiene may cause the demineralization of teeth by bacteria, also known as tooth decay. Streptococcus mutans is the primary bacteria responsible for tooth decay because of its ability to ferment carbohydrates present in the mouth to produce lactic acid that degrades the calcium in teeth. Though there are conventional methods of preventing tooth decay, such as the use of fluoride and xylitol, interactions among oral bacteria may yield another method of prevention. Studies have shown that bacteria such as Streptococcus oligofermentans and Streptococcus gordonii have the ability to inhibit the actions of S. mutans. S. oligofermentans utilizes lactic acid and converts it to hydrogen peroxide, which is very toxic to S. mutans. In addition, S. gordonii inactivates antimicrobial peptides produced by S. mutans, known as bacteriocin, which decreases their competitive nature towards other oral bacteria. Antagonistic interactions among oral bacteria may offer an alternative method for prevention of tooth decay that incorporates the bacteria already present in the mouth.

Rebecca Dusenbery (2008, T): McGill Auditorium@3:00 PM

Title: Webvlog: Cropcirclelodging.com
Major(s): Media Arts
Advisor(s): Hardacker


Abstract: Cropcirclelodging is a videolog and blog about media, art, the Internet and all things they affect or are affected by. Thoughtful observations will be made about various media modes, which we use for self-expression, education, communication and control. Assorted videos, art and photography have been curated. Links will direct the viewer to any one of many categories related to the site, including, but not limited to, other vloggers, artist sites, media education sites, and all around the home site as pages are added. Overall this site strives to be an outlet for atypical and inventive forms of expression whenever possible. The title suggests a bit of humor and, perhaps, an invitation to visitors to consider exploring something outside of their usual web viewing and, I hope, leave the site a bit more enlightened.

Sarah East (2012, T): Price 204@9:00 AM

Title: Utilizing Self Efficacy Theory to Increase Physical Activity
Major(s): Exercise Science
Advisor(s): Concepcion
Abstract: This was a service-learning project that was implemented through Unified Sports in Forest Grove. Unified Sports is a branch of the Special Olympics and involves inclusive practices and tournaments in a specific sport. People with special needs are more likely to be inactive and are often at a higher risk for secondary diseases. Two behavior change theories, self-efficacy theory (Bandura, 1986) and transtheoretical model (Prochaska & DiClemente, 1983), have been shown to be effective in increasing day-to-day physical activity in people with disabilities. Purpose: In this service project I prepared and delivered materials on these theories to educate the coaches and volunteers. Included in these materials were suggestions and methods to implement the concepts into their coaching and social interactions with the participants. The ultimate outcome goal of this service-learning project was to enhance the level and increase enjoyment for physical activity in youth with disabilities.

Ariana Eaton (2013, T): Berglund 139@1:00 PM

Title: Balance of Traits: The Female in Young Adult Novels
Major(s): English: Creative Writing
Advisor(s): Postma
Abstract: My thesis includes the opening chapter of my young adult novel, The Messenger, and a critical study that examines the central female characters in the novels Twilight by Stephenie Meyer, Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte, and The Hunger Games by Suzanne Collins. My protagonist, Artemis, struggles to cope with the death of her parents in the midst of uncovering family secrets and enduring supernatural events. Artemis, a quiet girl, finds strength in a parallel world while fighting grief and fear. Many readers claim that the Bella Swan of Twilight is incapable of doing anything for herself while Katniss Everdeen of The Hunger Games is praised for her strengths, however I argue there are several points in both books in which Bella is presented as strong and Katniss as weak, thus showing them as more balanced characters rather than representations of extreme ideas about femininity. In my study, I take into account the differences in their situations and examine how those differences influence their choices and personalities. I also determine Bella Swan is similar to Jane Eyre from Bronte's classic novel, even though Jane is not criticized by readers as much as Bella. My female characters will have a blend of strengths and weaknesses while still acting as good role models for young adult readers.

Brandon Eddy (2013, T): Price 204@4:30 PM

Title: The Effects of Focus of Attention Type and Direction on the Learning and Performance of Speech Tasks
Major(s): Exercise Science
Advisor(s): Jackson
Abstract: Focus of attention is a principle that has received significant attention in the motor learning domain. Specifically, for many limb movement tasks it has been shown that adopting an external focus of attention (e.g., focusing on the implement) significantly benefits learning and performance as compared to an internal focus condition (e.g., focusing on the limb itself). However, little research has been completed on the application of the focus of attention principle in the speech-language domain. Purpose: The purpose of the proposed study is to provide further evidence for the application of motor learning principles in the speech-language domain; specifically to determine the effects of various levels of focus of attention on the learning & performance of speech tasks. Methods: 40 participants took part in the study and were randomly assigned to one of four attentional focus conditions: external, internal, mirror, or control. Participants first took part in a baseline phase to determine normal intensity and rate when producing the sentence "Buy Bobby a poppy." Four tasks were created from this information: Loud (+10dB SPL), Quiet (-10dB SPL), Fast (1/2*normal rate), and Slow (2*normal rate). Participants took part in a pre-test, acquisition phase consisting of 20 trials of each task with % error feedback, post-test, and a retention-test using the original stimulus sentence, and a transfer-test with similar parameters while producing the sentence "Put all the groceries in the cart." Data Analysis: Absolute error from each of these tasks was collected using PRAAT computer software. Repeated measures ANOVAs were performed on each task to determine condition differences at the pre-, post-, and retention- tests. One-way ANOVAs were performed to determine condition differences at the transfer task. Results & Conclusions: Will be presented as to the effects of focus of attention type and direction on the acquisition, retention, and transfer of a novel speech task.

Christopher Eddy (2013, T): Strain 121@2:30 PM

Title: The Optical Properties of Quantum Dots
Major(s): Physics
Advisor(s): Butler
Abstract: The distinctive fluorescent properties of semiconductor nanocrystal quantum dots (QDs) yield experimenters a unique opportunity of measuring the dynamic uptake of QD-tagged-glucose by cancerous cells. In order to progress toward that goal, we report on initial experiments done to characterize the general photostability of solutions of CdTe QDs with varying ZnS shell thicknesses. In particular, we measured the absorbance spectra and the fluorescence intensity, wavelength, and lifetimes as a function of incident laser exposure. It was observed that increasing the ZnS shell thickness resulted in a shift toward longer fluorescence wavelengths, shorter weighted lifetimes, and an increase in photostability.

Piper Edwards (2008, T): Library Conference@9:00 AM

Title: Hidden Worlds
Major(s): Art
Advisor(s): Flory


Abstract: The beauty of the natural world has always called to me, from the colors that look too rich to be real to the animals that remind me of Mother Nature’s sense of humor. I have always dreamt of having the opportunity to travel the world and take photographs of things that make me smile, in the hope that those images might brighten someone else’s day as well. Often the photos I have taken that touch me the deepest do not have the same effect on my audience without my explanation of what I see. It took me a while to realize that the uniqueness and magical side of nature that tells me a story is not always easily translated onto film and is therefore often missed by my audience. This discovery has led me to search for a way to show the missing link between what I see in my personal favorite photographs and communicate that to the audience. For my senior show, I combined a past love of etching glass with the knowledge I have gained from photography courses. I began by taking those photographs that I held close to my heart, the ones whose beauty always seemed to elude other onlookers, and etched into a pane of clear glass those aspects that I knew would otherwise only be seen in my mind’s eye. For each piece, I placed the glass atop the image to expose the magical world I see in nature. After finding the link, I now hope that the same things that made me smile and feel a part of another world will be visible and influence my audience. I hope that these pieces will brighten someone’s day and open up his or her imagination. Those who just walk through life without looking for the enchantment may only see the photos, but for those who look at the world in another way, they may find something magical.

Hannah Edwards (2014, P): Price 1st Floor Hallway@11:00 AM

Title: Exploring the Experiences of NCAA Division III Athletes with Long-Term Injuries
Major(s): Exercise Science
Advisor(s): Bhalla
Abstract: An athlete knowingly risks injury when participating in a sport. Time out of sport due to injury can range from short-term (one day) to long-term (six months or more). Long-term injuries, in particular, can have an impact on the physical, psychological, and sociological well-being of an athlete. Literature related to the best methods to take to prevent injuries is extensive. However, there are fewer studies that examine how to psychologically help an athlete once a season-ending injury has occurred. Understanding there are several antecedents to an injury, our particular interest is the behavioral responses to a long-term injury. This study seeks to go beyond just the incidence of injuries to an understanding of the experiences of athletes surrounding how the injury occurred and subsequent behaviors related to dealing with a long-term injury. Purpose: To examine athletes' personal experiences with a long-term injury using phenomenological interviews. A long-term injury is defined as being out of sport participation for six months or more due to an injury obtained during play of the sport. Methods: Current and former NCAA Division III athletes were interviewed for 30-60 minutes about how their injury happened and what types of coping mechanisms they used to deal with and move on from the injury. Analysis: Interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed verbatim, and coded using open coding. Results: Findings will be delivered at the time of the presentation.

Holly Effenberger (2008, T): McGill Auditorium@2:00 PM

Title: The B-Street Story
Major(s): Media Arts
Advisor(s): Geraci


Abstract: Less than a mile away from campus is a piece of property that has become very special to many Pacific students, staff and Forest Grove community members. The B-Street Farm is a sustainability project that provides a place for local citizens to learn about environmentally friendly living practices. While many members of the Pacific and Forest Grove communities have heard of the B-Street Farm, they do not have a clear understanding of its projects and the concepts behind them. I created a Web-based interactive project to provide specific examples of B-Street practices and to convey the overall approach it takes to gardening and raising animals. Presented through the voices of those involved, the site tells the story of B-Street Farm through first-hand experiences, thoughts and photos. My project ultimately serves as a time capsule — capturing the efforts of this local project and, I hope, inspiring people to think about how their food is grown and processed.

Kali Eichen (2012, T): Berglund 200@2:00 PM

Title: What the Diary Did for Bridget Jones; Or Authenticity, Ouroboros, and Cake
Major(s): English: Creative Writing
Advisor(s): Postma
Abstract: In the critical introduction of my creative writing thesis I examine the novel Bridget Jones's Diary by Helen Fielding. The novel, structured as a diary, became a global phenomenon. Scholar H. Porter Abbott defined the three distinctive characteristics of the diary novel as mimetic, thematic, and temporal. Using his approach, I argue that the diary format helps Fielding's novel to affectively encapsulate the struggle of the middle-class, single woman at the end of the twenty-century. For the creative portion of my thesis, I wrote the first section of a novel entitled, Lest You Be Eaten: Diary of a Pastry Cook, which follows a twenty-two-year-old woman named Lucy, who aspires to be a pastry chef. Over the course of a year, she chronicles the day-to-day rigors of working at a haute cuisine restaurant. The first section begins with the job interview and spans the first month of work. Lucy desires to be accepted by the rest of the staff and to succeed in the physically demanding environment while hiding her debilitating asthma. Ultimately, she questions the way her coworkers define themselves through their jobs. I chose this form because I believe the structure inherently enhances empathy for Lucy. Her struggle to fit into the work environment invokes the traditional theme of isolation explored in all diary fiction. Keeping a diary helps Lucy succeed in the short term and leads her to discover her own self-worth by the conclusion of the novel. When I complete the writing of this novel, Lucy's diary will exist both in the fictional world and in reality as an artifact the reader can hold. This intertextual relationship between the reader, the novel, the diary, and the main character creates a self-referential loop that can only be achieved when a story is written in this format. I am fascinated with novels that use intertextual devices to glorify the act of writing, demonstrate a text's ability to authenticate a story, and connect the people in the world of the story and beyond.

Kiah Eilenfeldt (2011, T): Berglund 232@8:30 AM

Title: Building Confidence: A Self Study Through Writing Conferences
Major(s): Education
Advisor(s): Phillips
Abstract: How can I learn to facilitate effective writing conferences that encourage student-writing abilities and writing identities through a focus on my teacher talk, my ability to listen and make decisions about what a student needs, and my use of conference time? This is the question guiding the self-study research completed by teacher-researchers from the College of Education. Teacher-researchers spent six weeks conducting writing conferences with children grades K-8. We audio-recorded each session to analyze our own talk as teachers and our use of writing conference time. Each teacher-researcher transcribed and analyzed one audio recording each week. Teacher-researchers wrote field notes, collected related artifacts, and wrote two analytic memos during the research process. Our research group found the following common themes as we analyzed each other's and our own transcripts, journals, and field notes: 1) the influence of teacher's confidence on the writing conferences; 2) the importance of specific questions and compliments that propel the writer forward and build a writer's identity.

Daniel Eisen (2007, T): Marsh LL21@10:00 AM

Title: Filipino Americans and Americanized Filipinos: A Study of Differences in Ethnic Identity among those with Filipino Ancestry in Hawaii and Oregon
Major(s): Sociology
Advisor(s): Phillips


Abstract: Theorists from many disciplines offer competing theories about the saliency of an ethnic identity. Some argue that the importance of ethnicity fades with modernization, suggesting that ethnicity is largely a thing of the past, while others argue that ethnic identity is still an important factor in socialization and the self. This study looks at the importance of the Filipino ethnic identity between two locations, the state of Hawaii and the state of Oregon. Within each location, factors that could affect ethnic identification in individuals that are examined are: (a) perceptions of discrimination, (b) access to the Filipino culture through the family, (c) access to the Filipino culture through other institutions, (d) age and generational status, and (e) inter-racial marriages. A participant's acculturation pattern and acceptance or rejection of the Filipino ethnic identity was measured through a scale created by Declan Barry, Ph.D. The scale indicates whether an individual assimilates, integrates, separates, or marginalizes from the dominate culture. Overall, this study examines the cultural and structural conditions that guide a Filipino living in the United States to accept or reject his or her ethnic identity.

Brett Eldridge (2014, T): McGill Auditorium@3:00 PM

Title: Organochlorines in Marine Mammals
Major(s): Environmental Studies
Advisor(s): Gundersen
Abstract: Organochlorines are a group of environmental contaminants that were used as pesticides (i.e. DDT/DDE) and in a variety of industrial processes (i.e PCBs). Organochlorines are lipophilic and extremely persistent, which means they accumulate in the fatty tissues of animals, and biomagnify, reaching concentration that can impair the health of organisms. The California condor, (Gymnogyps californianus), is an opportunistic bird that was pushed to near extinction due a variety of factors including contaminants in their food source. One of the top condor breeding facilities is the Oregon Zoo. As part of the reintroduction of the California condor to the Pacific Northwest coastline, the Oregon Zoo has funded a study to analyze the level of organochlorine contaminants in beached marine mammals (a primary food source of condors). Preliminary work showed high levels of the organochlorine DDE in beached marine mammals. I have continued this work by focusing on contaminant levels in Stellar sea lions and Harbor seals found beached on the Oregon coastline. This project focuses more on the effects of these contaminants on mammal health. Blubber samples were analyzed using extraction, liquid chromatography, and gas chromatography (electron capture detector). The primary contaminant found in blubber samples was DDE, showing the ability of these chemicals to accumulate in fatty tissues. DDE was found at levels to have been shown to cause adverse health effects in related species. The impacts of these contaminants on marine mammal health will be discussed.

Ryan Elido (2014, P): Strain Hall 1st Floor@3:00 PM

Title: The Role of PINK1 and Parkin in the Onset of Parkinson's Disease
Major(s): Biology
Advisor(s): Clark
Abstract: A defective gene may cause certain types of diseases. Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and nuclear DNA (nDNA) in general are susceptible to genetic mutations as a result from errors during DNA replication. Depending on the gene and cell type affected, mitochondrial disease can arise as a consequence of these mutations. Chemical and genetic evidence suggests that the mitochondrial dysfunction is involved in the onset of Parkinson's disease. This neurodegenerative disease is the second most common disorder in humans. Several studies have suggested that PTEN induced putative kinase 1 (PINK1) and parkin are involved in maintaining mitochondrial integrity. Furthermore, mutations in these genes disrupt normal mitochondrial function. This analysis details the roles these genes have in the onset of Parkinson's disease.

Caitlin Ellerbe (2013, T): Marsh 201@2:30 PM

Title: Superheroes and Superheroines: Comic Book Fandom
Major(s): Sociology
Advisor(s): Whitehead
Abstract: Have you ever wondered why some people have a fascination with comic books? Or if anyone else has the same love of comic books as you do? This study looked into taste and fandom in comic book culture. Qualitative, in-depth interviews were conducted with male and female comic book readers. The interviews revealed a consistent need and enjoyment for strong stories and character development, with some differences of taste between mainstream comic book readers and alternative readers. Mainstream comic book fans have more inclusive interactions with others, while alternative comic book fans are more exclusive.

Steven Ellerd (2010, T): Berglund 200@11:30 AM

Title: Believe Everything Before Breakfast & "The Third God"
Major(s): English: Creative Writing
Advisor(s): Vesta
Abstract: In this presentation the Neil Gaiman contemporary novel American Gods will be examined with the critical approach of the Six Strange Pillars: discipline, enchantment, recovery, experience liberated, escape, and eucatastrophe, with special attention to the unique attributes of fantasy literature via mythopoesis and the divergence of the Six Strange Pillars from traditional mythological criticism. The presenter will then examine their own writing philosophy and read a selection from an original work, “The Third God.” In “The Third God,” the use of jolting cultural, temporal, and biological displacement as a vehicle for identity processing is pursued.

Noah Elliott (2008, T): Library Classroom@2:30 PM

Title: The Yalta Conference: Building the Foundation of the Cold War
Major(s): History
Advisor(s): Szefel


Abstract: The Yalta Conference provided the decisions confronting the allies of what and how to determine the fate of Europe as the end of the Second World War became a reality. Much history has been written about the event; however, recent investigations into the Soviet and Eastern European archives recently and the publishing of personal letters between Franklin Roosevelt and Joseph Stalin have introduced new evidence into the public and secret agreements made at the conference. This new evidence, when linked to the global events and new leaders after the end of the war, shows that the Yalta Accords violations repeatedly were highlighted, creating distrust between the Western Allies and the Soviet Union, accelerating the Cold War.

Benjamin Elliott (2008, T): Strain 121@2:00 PM

Title: honeyB
Major(s): Computer Science
Advisor(s): Khoja


Abstract: honeyB is a proof-of-concept demonstration of Swarm Intelligence, a rapidly developing branch in Artificial Intelligence research. Swarm Intelligence, also known as distributed intelligence, demonstrates the ability of many autonomous entities to make simple decisions that culminate in a decision that is beneficial for the group. This project uses 3D graphics to simulate the interaction of bees with each other and their hive. The presentation will include a demonstration of a working simulated beehive, along with a brief overview and history of the project.

Kaitlin Ellson (2008, T): Taylor Auditorium: Marsh 216@11:00 AM

Title: Grief in Schools: What Should be Done and What is Being Done
Major(s): Psychology
Advisor(s): Burns-Glover


Abstract: According to Cohen et al., 2006, there are three types of grief: uncomplicated, which is the normal grieving process after the loss of an important relationship; complicated grief, which lasts for longer than six months and which demonstrates separation issues; and childhood traumatic grief, which is unresolved grief that demonstrates symptoms of depression and PTSD. This is a proposal for a future research project that would consist of an analysis of what is recommend for treating children with traumatic childhood grief and what are the current practices implemented by Washington County school districts. Participants or cases would be interviews with stakeholders in Washington County schools and school websites and documents that are provided to the community by the schools about grief. The analysis would consist of coding the available documents on a 0,1 basis on whether the recommended practice is present or not present within the school. The interviews with stakeholders would be a series of open-ended questions about the practices for treating grief in school-aged children. The analysis would answer the question: Are schools in Washington County using best-known practices and what do stakeholders feel needs to be done in schools for children dealing with traumatic grief?

Sonja Elofson (2013, T): Berglund 232@1:00 PM

Title: Real World Applications of Math in a Migration Curriculum
Major(s): FG. Education and Learning
Advisor(s): Zijdemans Boudreau
Abstract: How do we encourage young people to integrate the language of math into their everyday lives? The Forest Grove Community School wants to address this question as it has noticed that many students do not understand how math applies to real world situations. To support this goal, we created an authentic learning experience for the third and fourth graders. Using observations, surveys, interviews, and research to inform our work, we have created a mini unit. This unit consists of five lesson plans, including an experiential learning opportunity, to be incorporated into the school's themed curriculum on migration. In these lessons, students will address the question, "How do house cats affect the Oregon junco population?" They will analyze the populations of juncos and house cats in the Forest Grove area by comparing graphs and interpreting their own data collected during a field trip activity. Based on their findings, the students will create an informational brochure to share their conclusions with the local community.

Nick Engelfried (2009, T): Strain 121@10:00 AM

Title: Power through the Paper: Writing as Environmental Activism
Major(s): Environmental Studies
Advisor(s): Gundersen
Abstract: Throughout the history of the environmental movement, the written word has been a powerful force for change. Writers such as Aldo Leopold and Rachel Carson helped launch environmentalism in the United States by alerting the public to problems like the degradation of wilderness and the poisoning of our air and water by pesticides. Meanwhile modern environmental writers, like Bill McKibben and Michael Pollan, are hard at work drawing attention to the climate crisis and the need to revolutionize our country’s food system. Over the last two years, I have experimented with the written word as a form of activism by writing short pieces that have been published in local newspapers, online magazines, and progressive Internet blogs. My published writings include commentary pieces on important environmental issues, reporting about on-the-ground activism I have been a part of, and articles about the youth environmental movement. In this presentation, I share some excerpts from some of my writings, and show how writing can advance the cause of environmentalism today.

Rose Engelfried (2012, T): Berglund 200@1:30 PM

Title: Into the Lyrical Unknown: An Exploration of Poetry and Allegory in Magical Realism Fiction
Major(s): English: Creative Writing
Advisor(s): Postma
Abstract: My creative writing thesis will include the opening chapters of my novel, as well as a critical study of novelist Patricia A. McKillip's work in the fields of magical realism and fantasy. Set in a world based on the pre-Industrial Revolution coastal culture of the British Isles, my novel draws on Celtic selkie legends to incorporate the magical within the everyday. In my text, the natural and the supernatural have shifted, allowing me to explore truths of human nature through allegorical paths. A seal becomes a character, as does the ocean itself. By stretching the boundaries of the physically possible and by creating a setting that becomes a character in its own right, I plan to offer readers a different way to look at their world and at themselves. In my thesis I also explore the power of poetic language. Following in the footsteps of World Fantasy Award-winning author Patricia A. McKillip, I hope to find a balance between lyrical language and narrative action by creating image-rich prose that will draw the reader into my story. McKillip, a trained musician, consciously manipulates her language to evoke certain rhythms and moods. In my critical introduction, I study McKillip's techniques and her approach to writing, including her goals as a writer and how they parallel my own. I also examine critical responses to her fiction from scholars in the feminist literary field to show how through her use of magical realism and allegory McKillip has been able to shed new light on pressing contemporary topics for readers. According to McKillip, the magical helps us to understand the everyday. This is a philosophy I plan to follow in my own writing.

Lorienne Engler (2014, T): Marsh 106@2:00 PM

Title: A Program Evaluation of An Animal Assisted Therapy Program
Major(s): Psychology
Advisor(s): Island
Abstract: This project reflects a guided program evaluation for an animal-assisted activity program, The Little Dog Laughed. This program is different from other animal-assisted therapy programs in that the observed collective sessions took place at two short-term residential domestic violence shelters. During other animal-assisted therapy programs, the interactive sessions are long-term and focus on the individual, both with respect to the objective goals and through the recording of progress. The Little Dog Laughed is an animal-activity program that uses dog training as a form for non-violent problem solving and life skills training. In conjunction with behavioral therapy professionals, this program gives opportunities for children of domestic abuse to interact with the dogs in short, 20-minute training sessions once a week. The children are introduced to a learning goal, provided guidelines for respectfully working with the dog, as well as tools (e.g., clickers and hand signals) to promote clear communication between the child and the trained dog model. See, Tag And Reward ("STAR"), the learning model for The Little Dog Laughed is consistent with the Positive Behavioral Intervention Supports (PBIS) plan used in schools for improving problem behavior. The two domestic violence shelters visited typically house families for 30 days or less, as the families may then elect to leave or are placed in a more permanent living situation. The opportunities to train and observe outcomes are limited both in terms of the length of each visit as well as the number of visits each residence receives. Therefore evaluating individual outcomes for a program of this kind can be challenging. Rather than observe changes in behavior over the long-term, since this data is not available, we examine short-term improvement. Behavioral improvement was evaluated through focal observation every 5 minutes for the 15 to 20 minute training sessions over a 12-week period. Areas of improvement were put into categories based on six different learning and behavioral goals: Metacognition (i.e., introspection, perspective-taking, error management, etc.), Engagement (e.g., paying attention), Instruction Adherence, Concept Recognition, Attitude, and Affect (e.g., animated, outgoing, fearful, etc.). The results of this program evaluation will be discussed relative to these six outcome goals.

Treva Erickson (2010, T): Berglund 232@2:30 PM

Title: Why Don't Emancipated Foster Youth Go To College?
Major(s): Social Work
Advisor(s): Ritter
Abstract: Each year in the state of Oregon, approximately 400 youth turn 18 and age out of the foster care system without the support of a legal guardian. Studies show these youth are at greater risk of poverty, homelessness, criminal involvement, early childbearing, and low educational attainment than the general population. According to researchers, only 50% of foster youth complete high school. The college attendance rate for foster youth who graduate from high school is 20%, compared to 60% of high school graduates in the general population. Child protective services agencies have been criticized for neglecting the educational needs of foster youth. Qualitative interviews were conducted with child protection caseworkers, foster parents, and child welfare advocates that influence legislative policies in order to examine what the Oregon Department of Human Services (DHS) and the state of Oregon could do differently to better prepare foster youth for post-secondary education.

Andrew Erickson (2011, T): Price 214@11:00 AM

Title: Genetic Transformation of Lactobacillus gasseri for Expression of Immunogenic Norovirus Capsid Protein VP1
Major(s): Biology
Advisor(s): Sardinia
Abstract: I propose a novel idea for delivering the immunogenic norovirus capsid protein VP1 by transforming Lactobacillus gasseri with an expression vector containing the gene encoding VP1. Norovirus has been identified as being the causative agent in a significant portion of cases of acute gastroenteritis. Noroviruses are particularly lethal in infection prone populations, such as the elderly or children. Histo-blood group antigens (HBGA) receptors have been recently identified as the norovirus receptor in humans. Recombinant norovirus capsid protein has been shown to induce immunity in mice and humans, however, no delivery vector for the immunogenic norovirus capsid protein has been elucidated. L. gasseri cultures expressing recombinant norovirus capsid protein will be used to produce yogurt for use as an oral vaccine. This vaccine would be used to innoculate Balb/C mice, which would then be challenged with live norovirus. Enzyme Immune Assays would detect the responsiveness of mouse antibodies to norovirus challenge. Saliva-based assays could detect blocking activity of recombinant norovirus capsid proteins expressed in L. gasseri on binding to human HBGA receptors. These results would provide a proof-of-concept of L. gasseri yogurt as an effective vaccine delivery vector that could convey immunity to norovirus. My hypothesis is that there will be no difference in human immune response to norovirus challenge between individuals who receive transgenic L. gasseri expressing a norovirus capsid protein and individuals who receive a control L. gasseri that does not express the protein.

Kayce Ernst (2009, T): Price 202@10:00 AM

Title: Social Facilitation Effects on Perceived and Unknown Evaluative Physical Tasks
Major(s): Exercise Science
Advisor(s): Jackson
Abstract: Social facilitation theory suggests an improvement or impairment of performance will occur when in the presence of others. Although social facilitation has been found to produce influential effects, the exact mechanism behind those effects is still uncertain. Purpose: To determine if a video camera can evoke a social facilitation response, and whether that response is more similar to being alone or being evaluated. Methods: 34 students from Pacific University performed two tasks: throwing a medicine ball and a sustained bilateral leg lift. Participants performed the two tasks under three conditions: alone, with an investigator evaluating, and being videotaped. Analysis: Performance in each of the three conditions (alone, evaluated, and videotaped) was compared using a one-way ANOVA on the following dependent measures: distance (ft) of medicine ball throw and time (sec) of the bilateral leg lift. Results: Data showed the videotaped condition performed better than the alone and evaluator conditions in the bilateral leg lift. Conclusion: Videotaping can show heightened performance levels, which may be due to higher levels of motivation and accountability from the participant.

Crystal Esch (2007, T): Library Conference@2:00 PM

Title: The Forever Ceramics Student
Major(s): Art
Advisor(s): O'Day


Abstract: The ceramic work I present today is a snapshot of the body of work that currently excites me. It reflects my fondness for strong, quiet forms, texture, and dark glazes. It's important to me that my work also evokes a tangible, ancient, utilitarian urge in the viewer. I want my work to stand alone as art, but to connect to its historically functional past as well. I tend to leave the surfaces of my functional art minimally glazed, allowing the characteristics of the clay, the textures, and the "scars" of my creative process to show. I use enough glaze to leave my pieces polished and as beautiful as they are fun to use. My sculptures are as much vessels as my functional work, so I chose to show the two together to point out that connection. Vessels are containers that can be found everywhere. They are cups, bowls, and teapots, but they are also the earth, our bodies, and the womb. I also equate my functional vessels with the human body, where the surface of a pot is like human skin. Our bodies embrace our spirit and our knowledge, and our skin records the scars that tell the story of our lives. And a woman's body, specifically, bears the ability to shelter and create life as the earth does. We use our functional ceramics to hold just as precious a material as our bodies hold, from tea for a special ceremony to the ashes of loved ones. What is important to me is that my female forms be considered as preciously functional as any other ceramic container. My art has taken on many different styles throughout my career. I don't settle on one technique; I think of my style more as one that can't be recognized. I mainly enjoy producing functional ware, and with it I like to explore new concepts and try new techniques. I associate my ever-changing emotions and point of view with different colors, textures, and forms, using a variety of different types of clay and firing processes. I can't limit myself in my choices because I grow and I learn and I change all the time, and so my art will change with me.

Fernando Estrada (2012, T): Price 203@8:30 AM

Title: Antibiotic Resistance Genes in Soils
Major(s): Biology
Advisor(s): Nyerges
Abstract: In the US half of the antibiotics produced are used for agricultural purposes, including animal husbandry. When animals are given antibiotics, selection for antibiotic resistant bacteria occur, and the resistance can spread to the surrounding environment (soil, water). The aim of this study was to test for the presence of antibiotic resistance genes in soil samples from different locations, not associated with human medicine: 1) a dairy farm in Corvallis, Oregon that uses three types of antibiotics, tetracyclines, penicillin and sulfonamides, to treat bacterial infections in their cows, 2) B-street farm, an organic farm that does not use any antibiotics, in Forest Grove, Oregon, and 3) Fern Hill wetland, a small lake located next to a wastewater treatment plant in Forest Grove, Oregon. The blaTEM-1 gene, encoding for penicillin resistance, was present in all samples tested. The tet(M), tet(O) (encoding for tetracycline resistance) and erm(B) (encoding for erythromycin resistance) genes were only found in the fertilized soil samples from the dairy farm. The sul1 gene (encoding for sulfanilamide resistance) was present in the fertilized soil samples from the dairy farm and in the sample from Fern Hill wetland. The presence of antibiotic resistance genes in agricultural soils, exposed to animal manure and in soil, exposed to wastewater (generally carrying antibiotics) indicate that these environments harbor antibiotic resistant bacteria and might serve as a reservoir for antibiotic resistance genes.

Riley Etheridge (2014, T): Marsh LL5@11:00 AM

Title: Hatred, Lust & Sloth
Major(s): Art
Advisor(s): Iijima
Abstract: 200 days recorded by Polaroid pictures, of the struggle against negative influences. With the unconscious and conscious passing of time, I will use a systematic ritualistic plan to reach the goals of overcoming these influences. Expressed through the continuous action of making a single chain of metal, to eventually pick up the rocks bearing Hated, Lust and Sloth.

Jasmine Eugenio (2010, T): Marsh 101@9:00 AM

Title: "I'm Dating A Haole Who Bowls: Interethnic Dating In Hawai'i And Mainland Contexts.:
Major(s): Psychology
Advisor(s): Burns-Glover
Abstract: Inter-racial dating has been the dominant target of research in the field of social psychology, however, inter-ethnic couples are of equal importance, but is rarely studied because of the complexities of culture and ethnicity. Cultural differences can often be attributed to a person’s position on an individual/collectivism [INDCOL] scale, therefore, a persons’ score on an individualism/collectivism measure is hypothesized to influence their outgroup dating attitudes. A replication of a previous inter-racial dating questionnaire (Levin, et al. 2007) included cultural measures and was administered to a total of 456 participants from Hawai`i and the Mainland. Results showed that a) interethnic anxiety was correlated with attitudes towards outgroups but not INDCOL; b) measures were reliable with Hawai’i samples; c) patterns of dating partners were not random; d) INDCOL measures correlated with ratings of certain outgroups; e) most respondents had low interethnic anxiety; f) most reported positive ethnic identity and group membership; g) most reported no pressure from their ethnic/social groups to not date outside their groups. Results are discussed in terms of cultural vs. racial theories of interethnic dating and the importance of multicultural/multiethnic samples in studies of dating.

Amy Evans (2008, T): Marsh 101@2:00 PM

Title: The Mental Health of American Veterans: ?Operation Iraqi Freedom?
Major(s): Psychology
Advisor(s): Island


Abstract: This presentation is an academic review of Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). PTSD is one of the most commonly diagnosed mental conditions among returning veterans of Operation Iraqi Freedom. Screening mechanisms in Veteran Assistance (VA) clinics consist of questionnaires, physical exams, and testing hormone levels. Early detection of mental health issues potentially decreases severity of symptoms while increasing life stability in veterans only when proper treatment is prescribed. Social support systems improve mental health conditions of war refugees by providing a sense of self-worth. The drastically under-funded VA health clinics provided for mentally unstable veterans are placing immense pressure on military patients who possess high rates of PTSD.

Parrish Evans (2011, T): Taylor Auditorium: Marsh 216@11:00 AM

Title: Mind, Body, Soul
Major(s): Media Arts: Film and Video Production
Advisor(s): Hardacker
Vaisburd
Abstract: Mind, Body, Soul is an experimental narrative film that fallows the story of a young man who tries to work out his past trials and tribulations through his memories of his life. I have structured this film as a "experimental narrative" that particularly relies on the visual images to convey the story. My senior project is the culmination of my studies at Pacific University where I have been exposed to the history of film and film theory that interrogates the relationship between film form and film meaning. My Film and Video education at Pacific has allowed me to explore many different forms of filmmaking. Through all of my film classes I have taken here and the work I've created, I've grown more confident in myself to use my knowledge of various video technologies as well as film techniques in my production of this film.

Mary Evans (2013, P): Price 1st Floor Hallway@1:00 PM

Title: Coefficient of Static Friction of Boot Sole Compositions and Roof Surfaces in a Simulated Firefighting Setting
Major(s): Exercise Science
Advisor(s): Henry
Abstract: Slips, trips, and falls are among the most common causes of injuries and fatalities in firefighting. Most falls occur on ladders and roofs. Although ladder accidents are complex and the solutions evasive, roof accidents are primarily due to inadequate friction between the firefighter boot and roofing surface. It is possible that different firefighting boots display different traction characteristics on the various roof surfaces typically encountered in the firefighting profession. If so, the boot sole with the highest traction on key, dangerous roof surfaces, should be identified and promoted for risk reduction. Purpose: The purpose was to test the coefficient of static friction of representative class D firefighter boots on different surface conditions to distinguish what surface and boot sole combination, and orientation, produce the least chance of slippage. Methods: A coefficient of friction instrument allowed testing of five different interchangeable roof surfaces, including metal, asphalt shingles, plywood, oriented strand board (OSB), and tar paper. Additionally, each of the roofing materials was tested under dry and wet conditions, simulating field experiences in firefighting. Three different boot sole compositions were tested with each roofing surface (and wet or dry condition) and in various orientations, simulating different firefighter stance positions on a roof. Results and Conclusions: To be presented.

Audrey Faber (2007, T): McGill Auditorium@9:00 AM

Title: Protecting a Journalist's Sources
Major(s): Media Arts
Advisor(s): Cassady


Abstract: Organizations such as Hamas and the Earth Liberation Front have long employed violent methods of resistance in their quest to change what they view as injustices. Those organizations, while never admitting to the use of violence, often maintain their tactics not only work but are the best methods of resistance. My thesis examines not whether or not violence is acceptable, but rather does it work? Are organizations that employ resistance and protest tactics that are violent able to succeed in the current world? Looking at two well-known social-movement organizations, the ELF and Hamas, I draw an assessment of the use of violence.

Audrey Faber (2007, T): Library Classroom@4:30 PM

Title: Using Violence to Resist
Major(s): Peace and Conflict Studies
Advisor(s): DeMoss


Abstract: With recent cases such as Judith Miller and other jailed reporters, the question of whether or not journalists should have to reveal the names of their sources to law enforcement or the government has come front and center. My thesis explores the notion of confidential sources and whether or not the media has the right to be shielded from punishment by the legal system for refusing to name names. I examine the history of shield law, analyze the journalistic ethics behind confidential sources, and provide suggestions for a federal shield law based on current proposed federal and state shield laws.

Devin Fachko (2014, T): Price 202@9:00 AM

Title: Investigating the diversity of methane associated microbial communities in the Lateral Bays of the Columbia River Estuary by targeting metabolic genes (pmoA and mcrA)
Major(s): Biology
Advisor(s): Nyerges
Abstract: Prokaryotic microorgranisms, specifically methanogenic archaea and methanotrophic bacteria, are essential contributors to the global methane flux. Anaerobic methanogens degrade organic waste, producing methane with the methyl-coenzyme M reductase enzyme, encoded by the mcrA gene. Conversely, aerobic methanotrophs consume methane using the methane monooxygenase enzyme, encoded by the pmoA gene. The objective of our study was to investigate the diversity of methanogenic and methanotrophic communities in the lateral bays of the Columbia River Estuary by targeting the metabolic mcrA and pmoA genes. DNA was extracted and purified from water and sediment samples and mcrA and pmoA genes were amplified using PCR. DNA samples with positive amplifications for either gene were then purified, cloned, and sequenced to confirm the identity of the targeted genes. Both methanogens and methantrophs were found in nearly all samples and phylogenetic trees for each group were constructed using the partial gene sequences. Analysis of both trees showed that the methanogenic community is more diverse than the methanotrophic community. The low level of diversity among the pmoA sequences could indicate that the methane oxidizing community is dominated by a small group of microorganisms. However it could also indicate a bias in our method. The widespread presence of the methanogens was unexpected due to their need for an anaerobic environment, leading to new questions about whether they are still producing methane in the aerobic water column. The results of this study warrant future research into the quantification of microbes in each community and how each community influences the methane flux of the Columbia River Estuary.

Thomas Fairfield (2014, T): Taylor Auditorium: Marsh 216@8:00 AM

Title: "The Box Score"
Major(s): Media Arts: General Media
Advisor(s): Cassady
Abstract: It is obvious that sports on campus is a huge hit among students. From the student-athlete to the everyday student, Pacific obviously loves its sports. However, prior to this project, there was no student run media team that gave exclusive coverage to the varsity and club sports. Over the last two years, a bi-monthly webcast summarizing recent sports events and achievements at Pacific has been created. This show, titled "The Box Score", runs alongside the newspaper and its "Boxercast" youtube newscast. At first the show included video of games, did interviews, produced, edited, and written by the project creator. New students have been added to the crew this year and the hope is that it will continue after the creator graduates.. If the project is continued it will have started something that could be a good future avenue for students looking to get experience in sports broadcasting.

Kelsea Falls (2013, P): Price 1st Floor Hallway@1:00 PM

Title: The Effect of Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness on Ankle Proprioception
Major(s): Exercise Science
Advisor(s): Henry
Abstract: Delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS) is described as the state in which an individual experiences a moderate degree of skeletal muscle stiffness, soreness, and lack of strength following exercise. This phenomenon may affect neuromuscular sensory receptors and neural pathways due to the micro-tears occurring in the muscle, thus impacting proprioceptive abilities. Proprioception is the awareness of body and limb position in space and time. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of DOMS on proprioception at the level of the ankle joint. Methods: Ten physically healthy adults completed a customized resistance training session for one leg, randomly assigned, with the goal of inducing DOMS. Prior to exercise, and 48 ± 8 hrs post exercise, both legs were tested via dolorimeter for muscle sensitivity and tenderness. If the experimental leg increased sensitivity >10% from pretest baseline, it was considered a valid DOMS leg. Using digital inclinometers, two custom-made ankle proprioception instruments, and a computerized data acquisition system, proprioception was assessed by having participants replicate actively-produced target angles and velocities of ankle inversion/eversion and plantarflexion/dorsiflexion movements. All testing trials were conducted in random and repeated design and without any immediate feedback of performance. For each of the three proprioceptive measures, percent error was analyzed via repeated measures two-way ANOVA. Results & Conclusion: To be presented.

Katie Faulk (2007, T): Library Classroom@4:00 PM

Title: Survival of the Fittest: Prenatal Testing and Disability
Major(s): Philosophy
Advisor(s): Boersema


Abstract: Through the completion of the Human Genome Project and the technology that is available in the field of prenatal testing, it is becoming possible to detect thousands of disabling characteristics before a person is even born. However, this poses the threat of embarking on the eradication of all who may possess characteristics that may not qualify as what is considered "normal." Using the expressivist argument as its foundation, this paper will argue that prenatal testing sends a very threatening message to the living disabled and therefore must be banned.

Katie Faulk (2007, T): Price 203@8:30 AM

Title: "Effect of Load Carrying on Walking Stride Length, Stride Frequency, and Economy
Major(s): Exercise Science
Advisor(s): Schot


Abstract: Background: One of the most intriguing questions in kinesiology is that of locomotor economy. It has been assumed that we are self-optimizing, naturally selecting a gait pattern that results in the most favorable ratio of metabolic cost to work output. . Previous work indicates that optimization may not be as natural as once thought. However, studies modeling the legs as force-driven pendulum oscillators show there is a strong mechanical basis for optimization and that locomotor economy is enhanced when strides are required to match the resonant frequency of the leg-pendulum model. It has also been shown that the body may independently self-optimize if placed under some form of stress. Load carrying has become commonplace in many occupations, particularly in the military where heavy loads are carried for long distances in less than ideal conditions. Soldier survivability is often dependent on the ability to perform tasks under fire; thus economy becomes a life or death factor. Purpose: The purpose of this project was to create a demanding walking condition that may draw out optimized gait patterns. Methods: 20 adult volunteers participated. Anthropometric measures were taken for pendulum modeling of the legs' resonant frequency, and participants were fitted with a heart rate monitor. A total of 4 treadmill walking trials at self-selected speeds were gathered: (1) No load, free frequency; (2) No load, resonant frequency; (3) Loaded, free frequency; and (4) Loaded, resonant frequency. The load consisted of 50 lbs carried in a standard issue internal frame rucksack. Resonant frequency was paced by an audible signal from a metronome. Analysis: Load and frequency effects on stride characteristics and economy were examined via repeated measures ANOVA.

Tara Fechter (2007, T): Strain 121@1:30 PM

Title: Exploring the Derivative of a Natural Number Using the Logarithmic Derivative
Major(s): Mathematics
Advisor(s): Emmons


Abstract: We begin with an expository overview of the concept of the derivative of a natural number. We examine the concept of the logarithmic derivative in this unfamiliar setting, a function that at first appears to behave without discernable pattern. We then determine the limit of the average values of this logarithmic derivative by bounding its values between two generating functions.

Alex Ferber (2012, T): CLIC@1:30 PM

Title: Post-Franco Spain: Contemporary Implications of Secularization, Liberation and the Dwindling Power of the Catholic Church
Major(s): International Studies
Advisor(s): Mahar
Abstract: Throughout Francisco Franco's thirty-five year reign as the totalitarian head of state in Spain, his nationalist party enjoyed close ties with the Catholic Church; this relationship between church and state was symbiotic and mutually beneficial. Roman Catholicism was officially declared the national religion of Spain, while the practice of other forms of religious worship was formally outlawed. To be Catholic, therefore, was more to question of Spanish identity than it was of religious identity. This started to change during Franco's later years in office, beginning with the Second Vatican Council in 1965. Among other things, the Second Vatican Council, also known as Vatican II, advocated religious liberty and a clear separation between church and state- this represented a significant defeat for Franco and the Nacionalcatolicismo (National Catholicism) in Spain. After Franco's death in 1975, Spain experienced one of the fastest transitions from the dictatorship to democracy. Occurring concurrently with this transition were the respective processes of liberalization and secularization. Today, Spain is identified as a progressive country even among other western European nation-states. This fact thus begs the question: what role does the Catholic Church play in contemporary Spain that has abandoned the repressive form of religious worship seen during the Franco period, and furthermore what are the cultural implications for a Church which has been steadily losing power for forty years?

Jessica Ferguson (2011, T): Strain 121@4:00 PM

Title: Robot Factory: A Puzzle Game for the Nintendo DS
Major(s): Computer Science
Advisor(s): Khoja
Abstract: Robot Factory is a puzzle game on the Nintendo DS hardware that uses touch screen and button input to control a bat and a robot as they attempt to escape from a warehouse. The robot must evade guards and maneuver around obstacles. If he is caught by one of the guards, he will be disassembled. The game uses a third-person, top-down perspective with the robot shown on the lower screen and the bat shown on the upper screen to represent their separate viewpoints. The goal of Robot Factory as a project is to build a game that uses touchscreen and button input simultaneously, but remains simple to play.

Justin Fernandez (2007, T): Price 202@10:00 AM

Title: He's Different, She's Different: Sexual Dimorphism in Homo sapiens
Major(s): Biology
Advisor(s): Halpern


Abstract: This paper summarizes some of the factors leading to sexual dimorphism in humans. Sexual dimorphism is differences between the sexes of the same species that are not directly related to the reproductive process. Sexual dimorphism is found in humans from the level of gene expression to the whole body. Sexual dimorphism at the level of gene expression, in the case of PDCH11X, is related to an escaping of X-inactivation, which in turn may lead to more sexual dimorphism, particularly in the gray matter distribution in the brain, as well as size and cerebral asymmetry. Androgen, a hormone seen early in human development, seems to play a role in sexual dimorphism at the systems level of the human body, such as the olfactory system and motorneuron number. For whole-body sexual dimorphism, size difference between male and females seems to be caused by numerous factors, most of which are based upon sexual selection and the health of people relative to their height.

Tony Fernandez (2012, T): Strain 121@10:00 AM

Title: How Does your Triangle Like To Tile?
Major(s): Mathematics
Advisor(s): Breslin
Abstract: We investigate which triangles can tile the Euclidean or hyperbolic plane without overlapping and determine exactly which triangles tile without overlapping. Euclidean triangles and hyperbolic triangles have different and this leads to contrasting results about tilings. In particular, while the Euclidean plan can be tiled by arbitrarily small triangles, we show that there is a least area triangle which tiles the hyperbolic plane without overlapping.

Tony Fernandez (2012, T): Library Conference@2:30 PM

Title: The Proof of the Machine vs. The Proof of Mankind
Major(s): Philosophy
Advisor(s): Boersema
Abstract: This presentation will discuss the qualifications of what should we consider a proof to be in mathematics. The goal here is distinguish both sides of the playing field to try to understand what they are saying. The proof of the machine and the proof of mankind will come into the balance as we discuss the philosophical issues on what is considered to be a proof. The three schools of thought, Intuitionism, Logicism, and Formalism will have their say in determining which side of the argument is better. Come with me on this journey of debate to see which sides win.

Christopher Fernandez (2013, T): Price 203@9:00 AM

Title: Bacteriophage therapy as a possible alternative for antibiotics
Major(s): Biology
Advisor(s): Nyerges
Abstract: The continual use of antibiotics has led many bacterial strains to develop antibiotic resistance and have made once noteworthy drugs completely ineffective. Consequently, research for an alternative form of medicine is vital for the treatment of bacterial infections in the future. An alternative form of medicine that has been considered is bacteriophage therapy. A bacteriophage is a virus that parasitizes bacteria and causes the bacterial cell to lyse as the virus replicates within the cytoplasm of the cell. In contrast to antibiotics, bacteriophages show a higher specificity to bacterial hosts, can replicate without being metabolized and have the ability to mutate and adapt to bacterial mutation, which renders low resistance rates. In particular, multi-drug resistant and pathogenic Psuedomonas aeruginosa has been observed to show susceptibility to bacteriophage treatment. This review will examine how bacteriophage therapy can be a promising alternative towards improving medical applications that can effectively treat P. aeruginosa infections in clinical settings.

Kasey Fernandez (2014, T): Berglund 200@8:00 AM

Title: 'Ike aku, 'ike mai, kōkua aku kōkua mai; pēlā iho la ka nohana 'ohana. (Recognize others, be recognized, help others, be helped; such is a family relationship.)
Major(s): Business
Advisor(s): Cowing
Abstract: Na Haumāna O Hawai‘i (N.H.O.H), Pacific University’s Hawaiian Club puts on an annual lū‘au every second Saturday of April. This lū‘au is not only important to the club and Pacific but it serves as a medium for the students of Hawai‘i to perpetuate their culture through chant, song, and dance. Over the years the lū‘au has established itself as a key event at Pacific University. From the humble beginnings of a few hundred people to the staggering 2,000+ people that now attend the event, the lū‘au has been sold out over the past few years. Based on our work with N.H.O.H, we will formalize marketing and financing plans so that in the future students will have an implementable plan that is both efficient and effective. The financing plan includes an analysis on expenses in order to identify ways to reduce costs and wastes, and also a pricing plan for lū‘au tickets that will be appropriate for both the Hawaiian Club and it’s audience. The marketing plan entails a detailed S.W.O.T. analysis, an assessment of alternatives and substitutes, and recommendations for implementing several different advertising and promotion campaigns. As the Hawaiian Club is a non-profit organization, we want to create a plan that will attract a larger audience for the club’s annual lū‘au that will enable the club to mount two full shows, Friday and Saturday so that the club can continue to grow and provide all members with the experience and ʻohana college students can use on their journey through Pacific.

Jordana Ferreira (2011, T): Marsh 101@8:30 AM

Title: Interethnic Dating: Cultural Orientations and Dating Choices
Major(s): Psychology
Advisor(s): Burns-Glover
Abstract: We present the research on horizontal and vertical collectivism and its role in intergroup relations, dating, and interpersonal attraction. Using data from a large-scale (N= 500) study on dating and friendship patterns among Hawai`i and mainland residents, we apply emerging theories of regional cultures and identities (Cohen & Vandello, 1999; Renfrow, et al. 2007) to the unique multiethnic and multicultural intergroup relations in Hawai`i. Collectivism scores were used to predict intergroup relation scores and ratings of whom respondents would date. Follow up interviews with respondents (N=20) were conducted and coded for emergent themes of the role of culture in dating choices and outcomes of those relationships.

Eli Ferreira (2014, T): Berglund 200@9:00 AM

Title: Wake Up Now
Major(s): Business
Advisor(s): Cowing
Abstract: Wake Up Now is a vast, rapidly growing network-marketing program that I joined last summer. I gained much knowledge from my experiences as part of Wake Up Now. Each person that signs up to be a part of the Wake Up Now team does so as an Individual Business Owner (IBO), effectively creating their own business. Wake Up Now offers various benefits in addition to the products themselves. My presentation will talk about the organization itself including a brief background, the organizational structure, and company operations. This capstone project will highlight the inter-relationship between my studies at Pacific University and my experiences at Wake Up Now. Finally, my project will address some of the misconceptions that may be held about businesses like Wake Up Now.

Whitney Ferren (2011, P): Strain Hall 3rd Floor@3:00 PM

Title: Female mate choice in the Satin Bowerbird (Ptilonorhynchus violaceus) using male courtship vocalizations as cues for reproductive success
Major(s): Biology
Advisor(s): Halpern
Abstract: Avian song is under sexual selection, and may be a trait utilized in female choice as an honest indicator of the male's overall condition. Relatively little is known, however, about female choice concerning vocalizations in mating systems with prominent visual displays, such as bowerbirds. In this proposal I address this gap in knowledge using satin bowerbirds. Male satin bowerbirds song repertoires are unique to the individual; song traits (longer songs, a larger number of syllables within a song, and a large proportion of accurately copied notes) are very important for distinguishing one male form another, and create a variety between males, allowing for female discrimination. In this project, I will explore the variation in song repertoire of individual males and how their mating call affects both female choice and solicitation displays. I will also compare the advertising calls of male in various stage of maturity, and assess the effect on solicitation displays of female in response to these calls. I will also assess the heritability of these traits to the male offspring through HVC nuclei in the forebrain, which are responsible for song production and learning. I will use song analysis, along with playback experiments to provoke solicitation responses from females, as well as tissue analysis to compare the paternal and offspring's HVC song nuclei in the brain. I expect males with larger song repertoires to evoke more solicitation displays form females. Furthermore, I would expect the repertoire characteristics of these males to be heritable to their male offspring; that is the offspring would have similar HVC volume, as well as a larger repertoire with similar song traits.

Jennifer Ferrer (2008, T): Library Conference@11:30 AM

Title: Inward Me: An Exploration of the Self through Art
Major(s): Art
Advisor(s): Cheyne


Abstract: I do not want you to come inside, but the only way to view a piece of me is to view my work. Art goes beyond a superficial level; the intent of my work is to neither showoff a capability nor to please the masses with visual stimulus. Rather, the creation of art stems from a need to expel my internal struggles, rooted through various heavy-hearted experiences. Therapeutic in its intent and through its construction, my work tears down the hardened layers of my memories and exposes the raw surface that remains. This results in a process that goes beyond just “art making” but accumulates emotional energy in the enigmatic exploration of life. My work starts with an idea, but rarely ends like it began. As I play with a variety of materials, my hand and mind exist in relationships that result in either alleviation or anxiety. This intuitive process develops into a diversification of color, material, form and representation. I do not define barriers when I am producing (except for time, maybe), though the concept of my work deals with the confinement of resolution from problem. Outside this emotional frame, there are no limitations with materials used. A pie can be made out of clay, fiberglass resin and paper, or a book can be made out of a mouse trap. This creative freedom unleashes work that is reflective; whether it depicts a hand ripping off a face or a dilapidated structure that delves through layers of darkness, the experience a viewer has with my work mirrors my interior state of mind.

Aes Ferrer (2011, T): Marsh 101@9:00 AM

Title: A Social Relationships Intervention Program for Bullying: Lifeskills Field Day.
Major(s): Psychology
Advisor(s): Burns-Glover
Abstract: Rising concerns about the incidence of bullying in schools prompted a collaboration between a rural elementary school and local university. College students designed and implemented a social-relationships building "field day" of activities to address problem solving, friendship skills, and bystander intervention . Pre-test data from three sixth-grade classes (N=85) were collected. The pre intervention questionnaire assessed current perceptions of bullying; students' goals for the new year, and their perception of their current academic, social and extracurricular skills Bullying was experienced and observed most often on the playground. The school climate was one of a "code silence" about bullying: while school stakeholders reported problems, the majority of kids (70.5%) report never being bullied, however 48.2% reported seeing others bullied. Only 47% believed it was a problem at their school. Students were asked what could be done to reduce bullying (31% mode was adult intervention and 25% gave no response). The intervention addressed these perceptions and post-participation narratives were coded to assess a) which activities they enjoyed; b) what they learned about another person and c) what they learned about themselves. We compared these with ongoing data and perceptions from school teachers, counselors. Several themes emerged: increased social skills and awareness about peers; discovering leadership potential in self and others; and frequent mentions of "trust," cooperation and teamwork.

Shane Feuerbach (2014, T): Berglund 145@9:00 AM

Title: Hard Hitting? Football, Science, and Suicide in the Media
Major(s): Politics and Government
Advisor(s): Van Dyk
Abstract: Football has evolved from a hobby of sports enthusiast to a global phenomenon where modern-day gladiators face off in front of millions of fans. The National Football League has become a billion dollar corporation that breaks viewership records and endorsement deals year after year. In recent years, however, the science surrounding the effects of concussions has proved that these gladiators often put their long-term health on the line every time they buckle their chinstrap. When did the concussion issue finally make it onto the American agenda? How has it been portrayed in the media? In this study, I analyze the concept of agenda setting and look to theories on media to see how and when the issue was portrayed by the media, and whether the media was biased towards the National Football League or football players. This thesis analyzes five different newspapers over the course of twenty-three years. I find that the concussion issue failed to make it onto the agenda for many years and there was a lack of coverage in the media in the 1990s and early 2000s despite the high profile retirements and suicides of many NFL legends. The framing of articles in this study shows that it was not until medical science proved the effects of brain trauma suffered in NFL players that the media portrayed the issue in a fair and balanced form. I also find that the media sided with major corporate interests by depicting the view of the NFL most commonly.

Helen Fibbs (2012, T): McGill Auditorium@10:30 AM

Title: Feasible Low-Impact Living: An Exploration into Household Sustainability
Major(s): Environmental Studies
Advisor(s): Van Buskirk
Abstract: Global climate change is an interdisciplinary and controversial topic that is changing our world. While we debate its existence, polar ice caps are melting, sea waters are rising, weather patterns are changing, and we as individuals feel helpless to stop it due to the sheer enormity. This study is an exploration of the actions available in individual households and a review of the effects small behavior changes can have on reducing our carbon emissions. My goal for this investigation was to try to make green alternatives the first choice for consumers by determining what effects they may or may not have on the things that matter most to people: their finances and the environment. A secondary goal was to establish my house as a lab and to determine how feasible environmentally conscious decisions are for the masses. Through my investigation I found that there are some very simple things people can do to have a large impact on the environment and there are also some more tedious options that may not be as feasible for the average person. I feel that through the process of education, more people will understand the importance of using the green alternatives, and I am optimistic that they will implement these easy ideas into their daily lives, thus reducing our carbon emissions and lowering the human causes of global climate change.

Gabrielle Fibbs (2012, T): Price 203@2:30 PM

Title: Seeing the Extraordinary in the Ordinary "In photography, everything is so ordinary. It takes a lot of looking before you learn to see the extraordinary." ~David Bailey
Major(s): Art
Advisor(s): Flory
Abstract: Breathing slows; sounds begin to fade; my focus narrows; the outside world dissolves away. My surroundings begin to whisper to me and to reveal that which was once hidden as the ordinary melts away to reveal the extraordinary. Soon I am enveloped by details, colors, textures, light and beauty before unseen. It is not until that moment that I raise the camera, place my eye behind the viewfinder and forever capture the unexpected. As a species, the human race has become exceedingly preoccupied. We surround ourselves with noise: televisions, iPods, computers, personal gaming systems, the list could go on. These items have become an integral part of who we are, and while they have their place and are often extremely vital, they have also served to detach us from the natural world in which we live. In such a fast paced, loud and boisterous world, many have stopped being able to see -- really see -- the physical beauty that is all around us.

Abigail Fiegenbaum (2014, T): Marsh 106@2:00 PM

Title: A Program Evaluation of An Animal Assisted Therapy Program
Major(s): Psychology
Advisor(s): Island
Abstract: This project reflects a guided program evaluation for an animal-assisted activity program, The Little Dog Laughed. This program is different from other animal-assisted therapy programs in that the observed collective sessions took place at two short-term residential domestic violence shelters. During other animal-assisted therapy programs, the interactive sessions are long-term and focus on the individual, both with respect to the objective goals and through the recording of progress. The Little Dog Laughed is an animal-activity program that uses dog training as a form for non-violent problem solving and life skills training. In conjunction with behavioral therapy professionals, this program gives opportunities for children of domestic abuse to interact with the dogs in short, 20-minute training sessions once a week. The children are introduced to a learning goal, provided guidelines for respectfully working with the dog, as well as tools (e.g., clickers and hand signals) to promote clear communication between the child and the trained dog model. See, Tag And Reward ("STAR"), the learning model for The Little Dog Laughed is consistent with the Positive Behavioral Intervention Supports (PBIS) plan used in schools for improving problem behavior. The two domestic violence shelters visited typically house families for 30 days or less, as the families may then elect to leave or are placed in a more permanent living situation. The opportunities to train and observe outcomes are limited both in terms of the length of each visit as well as the number of visits each residence receives. Therefore evaluating individual outcomes for a program of this kind can be challenging. Rather than observe changes in behavior over the long-term, since this data is not available, we examine short-term improvement. Behavioral improvement was evaluated through focal observation every 5 minutes for the 15 to 20 minute training sessions over a 12-week period. Areas of improvement were put into categories based on six different learning and behavioral goals: Metacognition (i.e., introspection, perspective-taking, error management, etc.), Engagement (e.g., paying attention), Instruction Adherence, Concept Recognition, Attitude, and Affect (e.g., animated, outgoing, fearful, etc.). The results of this program evaluation will be discussed relative to these six outcome goals.

Nick Fillis (2007, T): McGill Auditorium@2:00 PM

Title: Illustration of the Imagination
Major(s): Media Arts
Advisor(s): Geraci


Abstract: From a very young age, I have always been fascinated and inspired by animation, and these feelings have only been fanned by the renaissance of animated visual stimuli in our current culture. My senior project grew from this fascination and appreciation for the illustrated moving image. I created four, unrelated animations using a variety of approaches and techniques (e.g. rotoscoping, key framing, etc.) and tied them all together with an integrated user interface. During my presentation, I will show the animations, reveal how they were created, and discuss my process and motivations.

Sarah Fillis (2013, T): McGill Auditorium@2:00 PM

Title: Landscape Design for the Miracle Gro Junkie
Major(s): Environmental Studies w/ Sustainable Design Emphasis
Advisor(s): Gundersen
Abstract: The average homeowner will look out at their green lawns and bark-dust covered flowerbeds and see a healthy and beautiful landscape. It may give them a sense of pride that they were able to conquer their weed nemesis or keep that lawn lush all summer long. This type of landscape has become the ideal, but they are not healthy. These yards are struggling with chemical dependency, infertility and high energy inputs. Because of our attachment to this visual ideal and their chemical enhancements, most homeowners are resistant to alternative landscaping methods. This project addressed this resistance by providing natural, low input, alternatives to chemical "fixes", as well as designing landscape elements that keep in mind that visual ideal. Yards and gardens can be magazine cover ready, as well as healthy, drug-free, and productive members of the residential ecosystem.

Molly Fischer (2007, T): Price 214@9:00 AM

Title: Focus of Attention with Mental Training on a Novel Motor Task
Major(s): Exercise Science
Advisor(s): Jackson


Abstract: Previous studies have found that, when learning a new task, an external focus of attention (focusing on something outside of the body's movements) is more effective that an internal focus of attention (focusing on the body's movements). However, although we know that there are many effective forms of practice, previous research has only examined this effect in physical practice. What would happen if an internal and external focus of attention were utilized during the mental practice of a skill? Would the benefit of an external focus of attention still be found? Purpose: The purpose of the current study is to determine if the benefits of an external focus of attention are present when the skill is mentally practiced. Methods: The current study replicated research by Hob & Prinz (1998), which found strong benefits in using external focus of attention when practicing a balance task. Instead of physically practicing the skill under focus conditions, participants in the current study were guided through mental practice sessions of the task. Participants mentally practiced fourteen 90-second trials of the balance task and were given a pre-test, post-test, and retention test to determine performance. Analysis: Repeated measures ANOVA will be used to determine the effects of focus of attention over time. Results: Results will be presented as to the effectiveness of using an internal or external focus of attention when mentally practice a balancing task.

Bob Fitzmorris (2008, T): Price 203@11:30 AM

Title: Investigating the Lack of Cytochrome P450 1A1 Gene Expression in Paddlefish
Major(s): Chemistry
Advisor(s): Gundersen
Sardinia

Abstract: Previous research on the American paddlefish (Polydon spathula) showed that the fish lacks the enzyme Cytochrome P450 1A1. This enzyme is important in the metabolism of many xenobiotic compounds, including some pesticides. The purpose of this study is to determine why the gene for Cytochrome P450 1A1 is not expressed in paddlefish. Polymerase chain reaction was used to find the genes in paddlefish DNA that are necessary for the production of Cytochrome P450 1A1.

Amy Fitzpatrick (2008, T): Marsh 201@3:00 PM

Title: You are not Alone: Geriatric Bereavement Support Groups
Major(s): Social Work
Advisor(s): Doerfler


Abstract: The literature suggests that low levels of emotional, social, and financial support are particularly damaging for the physical functioning of senior citizens. When grieving, efforts to function optimally are even further challenged. It may take several years for the bereaved to resume typical levels of activity and to enjoy life again. Further, it has also been shown that talking with others who are grieving can be beneficial. Given this context and the services offered at Hospice and Palliative Care of Washington County, the capstone project focused on the development of bereavement support groups within county senior centers. Specific intervention sites include Forest Grove, Hillsboro, and North Plains. This paper focuses on the development of the group curriculum, group composition, and the benefits of group participation.

Mary Flack (2013, P): Strain Hall 3rd Floor@11:00 AM

Title: In Search of Optimum Reaction Conditions for the Metallation of Tetraphenylporphyrin
Major(s): Chemistry
Advisor(s): Gohdes
Abstract: In the integrated lab course at Pacific University, students are asked to metallate tetraphenylporphyrin. The literature procedures that were utilized did not yield high success rates. In this research, the kinetics for the insertion of Zinc(II) and Iron(II) into tetraphenylporphyrin are examined in order to determine optimal reaction conditions. The metal starting material, solvent, concentration of the base, and temperature were systematically varied. Changes in UV-vis absorption spectra were used to determine the reaction kinetics for the different conditions.

Ian Flannery (2013, T): Price 202@10:00 AM

Title: Peak Applied Forces and Pressures of Commonly Used Massage Therapy Techniques
Major(s): Exercise Science
Advisor(s): Henry
Abstract: Massage therapy is often incorporated into healthcare settings as a possible viable treatment, or at least complimentary intervention, for acute and chronic musculoskeletal conditions, pain, stress, and various other conditions. Although numerous research studies have investigated the efficacy of massage therapy, few studies report the forces and pressures associated with their own experimental independent variable (massage). In fact, surprisingly little is known about the contact force and pressure that licensed massage therapists (LMTs) use when performing various techniques. Measuring and standardizing the forces and pressures associated with common massage techniques is essential to the scientific study, and application, of massage therapy. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to quantify the peak applied forces and pressures associated with petrissage, effleurage, compression, tapotement, friction, and vibration techniques. Methods: Participants were required to be licensed and currently practicing massage therapists. Participants performed massage techniques on a custom built instrument, which utilized multiple force gauges (1000 Hz sampling frequency) measuring horizontal and vertical forces (N), and interfaced with a computerized data acquisition system. In randomized and repeated design, each therapist performed multiple trials of each technique under very specific guidelines, including light, average, and heavy pressure they would apply on a typical quadriceps muscle group, and absolute minimum and maximum pressures. Applied surface area for the calculation of pressure was obtained via image analysis of contact area ink prints. Results & Conclusions: To be presented.

Haley Fleshman (2013, T): Berglund 232@2:00 PM

Title: "Learning through Creative Artistic Expression" The Benefits of Art in Education
Major(s): FG. Education and Learning
Advisor(s): Zijdemans Boudreau
Abstract: How does art help initiate the motivation to learn, support developmental growth, and aid students in thinking critically? The researchers referred to over thirty articles written on art education to help explore this question. The researchers then spent seven weeks conducting over thirty-six hours of observations in the atelier at the Early Learning Community with two different preschool classes. Researchers collected both audio and visual artifacts of the students' artwork, took detailed field-notes, developed a five-question, qualitative and quantitative, survey for forty parents, and created a ten-question, qualitative and quantitative, survey for the six teachers and one director. Their data was analyzed through comparison and trustworthy checks in weekly group meetings. The following themes emerged: 1) Art does help students with the motivation to learn, developmental growth, and critical thinking; 2) The majority of parents of ELC students strongly agree that art is an important aspect in education; and 3) The teachers in the ELC try to connect art to classroom learning as often as they can. These outcomes suggest that the framework of the Early Learning Community, which integrates the culture of Reggio Emilia, Montessori, and Waldorf educational approaches, is conducive to supporting engagement in the arts.

Sarah Flinn (2012, T): CLIC@3:00 PM

Title: Latina Youth in Commercial Sexual Exploitation
Major(s): International Studies
World Languages: Spanish
Advisor(s): Mahar
Welsh
Abstract: Human trafficking and specifically human sex trafficking occurs throughout the world, in nearly all countries. Increased awareness of this problem has led many organizations to begin taking action to prevent sexual exploitation. For example, Portland, Oregon is already making a huge difference in the lives of numerous trafficking survivors through the work of organizations such as the Sexual Assault Resource Center and Janus Youth Programs. Their central focus has been on U.S.-born minors who have been forced to participate in the sex trade, both in Oregon and elsewhere. However, resources are limited and culturally specific programs are lacking in our area. Latina survivors of trafficking present a different set of needs that require culturally aware and sensitive care. My research aims to highlight the unique needs of Latina survivors and provide an outline of how Portland can better support all survivors.

Devon Flores (2012, T): Price 203@3:00 PM

Title: A Mystery in Time
Major(s): Art
Advisor(s): Flory
Abstract: I create fashion-magazine style images using controlled settings and lighting to glamorize people and material goods. More importantly I try to glamorize the feeling of a moment, ultimately capturing a secret in time, one of which viewers want to find out. My ideas come from everyday life, but are formed into more sophisticated metaphors for the overlooked beauty of what is unconventional. I use posed and unposed figures in my photography, however the environment is always physically controlled, I select props, make up, clothing and a setting. I have the drive to create these photographs in response to the images I see daily along with the ever-changing world, socially and physically. I want others to be inspired by the details and the conceptual mystery in my photographs, creating a visual experience that evokes a question in the observer. My overall vision is that these pictures will one, draw you in with curiosity and two, make you feel like there is more to life than the world we see everyday, leaving the viewer wanting to be apart of the embellished world I have constructed within a rectangle. Ultimately extending the experience of the viewer with a momentary image.

Devon Flores (2012, T): Marsh 201@1:30 PM

Title: Making the Difference
Major(s): Media Arts: General Media
Advisor(s): Cassady
Abstract: A photo documentary showing the efforts of Pacific University students in community service and an analysis of Pacific University's civic engagement in the community. It portrays the significance of student led groups and individuals using the impact of imagery. The project discusses what community service means to Pacific University and its students. The documentary shows Pacific's involvement in the community by exploring the range of service involving civic based groups, off-campus events and the variety of students that participates in them.

Briana Flores (2013, T): Strain 121@1:00 PM

Title: Tsunami Forecasting: Linear vs. Non-linear Models
Major(s): Mathematics
Advisor(s): Guenther
Abstract: Reflecting on tsunami events such as the Tohoku tsunami of March 2011 or the Sumatra tsunami of December 2004 reminds everyone of how destructive and devastating a tsunami can be. Mathematical models provide different types of information regarding tsunamis such as the locations that it will affect, estimated time of arrival to shore, height, and power. By relying on the results of their mathematical models, Tsunami Watch centers are able to determine what types of precautions residents should take. Models can either be linear, which are numerically more stable and faster to compute, or non-linear, which are generally more accurate. Time is of the essence for tsunami forecasting, so a faster model could save lives. So, when do linear models produce good approximations of non-linear models? To study this concept, I use software from the Pacific Tsunami Warning Center and a model based off the Shallow Water Wave Equations to compare simulations.

Gabe Flory (2014, T): Price 202@11:30 AM

Title: The Effect of Supplementation Type and Timing on Strength and Endurance Gains
Major(s): Exercise Science
Advisor(s): Faulk
Abstract: The anabolic window, or the 45 minutes following a strength training workout, is a critical time for athletes, where, in the presence of the proper nutrients, repair of damaged muscle proteins and replenishment of glycogen stores is initiated. Similarly, pre-exercise nutrition has also shown to be effective for recovery as long as it occurs approximately 30 minutes prior to the bout of exercise. The nutrient composition of pre- and post-workout meals can alter the effectiveness. The optimal ratio of carbohydrate-to-protein has been shown to be 3-4:1 ratio. Annual sales of exercise nutrition products in the US are over $2.7 billion. However, foods are regarded as a better source of nutrients for athletes than those of supplements, possibly due to chemical changes associated with processing. Consequently, chocolate milk has recently emerged as an ideal supplement for exercise nutrition, as it has a ratio of about 4:1, meeting these standards. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to: (1) determine whether chocolate milk would result in larger strength and endurance gains than whey protein and carbohydrate powder supplements; and (2) determine whether nutrient timing (pre- or post-exercise) led to differing effects. Methods: Healthy, trained, college-aged adults (n = 24) already engaged in a voluntary, structured resistance training program were randomly assigned to one of four groups: pre-exercise chocolate milk (PRE-CM), pre-exercise whey/carbohydrate powder (PRE-WH), post-exercise chocolate milk (POST-CM), or post-exercise whey/carbohydrate powder (POST-WH). Supplementation consisted of .22 grams protein and .52 grams carbohydrate per kilogram of body mass from either whey and carbohydrate powder or chocolate milk. Skinfold, indirect one-repetition maximum parallel squat and bench press exercises, and BEEP pacer tests were performed at baseline and again at 7 weeks to assess changes in strength and endurance. All data analyses were performed using SPSS software. Results: Findings from the research will be presented on Senior Projects Day.

Brooke Fogwell (2010, T): Berglund 200@9:00 AM

Title: In Defense of the Diary
Major(s): English: Creative Writing
Advisor(s): Johnson
Abstract: Keeping a private journal or diary has always delivered my most passionate and uncensored writing, so I felt strongly about researching how the craft of diary writing is overlooked. It takes courage to keep a diary, to become overwhelmed with emotion that the only way to release your feelings is to write it all down for only your eyes to see. In our society the diary isn’t seen as the most credible form of writing, but it should be, considering the structure and form a diary takes. Diary writing has taught me to consider who we write to during the initial drafting period should be ourselves. It has allowed me to engage my most honest self, which is crucial to the genre of Creative Nonfiction. After researching different aspects of the genre I will take what I have learned and critique my own creative work. Looking at the often overlooked, yet crucial step to composing emotionally honest prose, I will discuss how diary writing helps one achieve elements of craft: voice, imagery, mood and metaphor. My own personal critique will also help connect my thoughts and reasoning behind establishing some understanding of “Truth” in Creative Nonfiction.

Kimberly Ford (2007, T): Price 204@9:00 AM

Title: Efficacy of a Clinical Sit-to-Stand Device: An Analysis of Heart Rate
Major(s): Exercise Science
Advisor(s): Henry


Abstract: Healthcare industry workers sustain 4.5 times more overextension injuries than any other type of occupational workers. Both patient falls and caregiver injuries are major problems in the healthcare industry. Due to the increase in healthcare worker back injuries, healthcare facilities are beginning to utilize sit-to-stand devices for the transfer of patients. Use of these devices has been shown to reduce significantly the effort of transferring patients/residents and nurses which, as a result, decreases the number of musculoskeletal and back overextension injuries. Many healthcare facilities have assistive devices at their disposal; however, healthcare workers are reluctant to use them for many reasons, including the devices are bulky, inconvenient for the operator, and are uncomfortable for the patient. The sit-to-stand device utilized for this research is a newly designed model created to account for downfalls of the current on-the-market assistive devices. Although there has been research on how transfer devices reduce the effort of caregivers, very little research has been conducted on how these devices affect the patients. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine the efficacy of sit-to-stand devices for reducing overall energy expenditure, estimated from steady-state heart rate. Methods: Twenty volunteer college-age participants were recruited to participate in this study. Each participant was trained on the proper technique of executing a "sit-to-stand" movement from a standard chair with and without utilization of a manual sit-to-stand device. In "ABAB" repeated measures design, subjects executed trials of 45 sit-to-stand motions from a standard chair with (A) or without (B) the use of a manual sit-to-stand device (each time returning to the seated position to complete a cycle, cadence of 15 cycles per minute established by metronome). The primary ordering of trials were randomized (ABAB or BABA), and participants were allowed 30 seconds rest between trials. While doing these movements, heart rate was recorded and transferred to computer software for analysis. Steady-state heart rate, representing relative energy expenditure, was compared via dependent t-test for the two conditions (A and B).

Ryan Ford (2010, T): Marsh 106@2:30 PM

Title: Optical Limiting in Capillary Waveguides at 1300nm
Major(s): Physics
Advisor(s): Butler
Abstract: Optical limiting at 1300nm, a commonly used telecommunications wavelength, was observed in glass capillaries filled with a solution of (polypridyl) osmium (porphinato) zinc II, or OsPZnOs, in dimethyl sulfoxide. The refractive index of the solution was such that incident light was guided through the core of the capillaries. This allowed for an increase of the interaction length between the light and the solution, thereby enhancing the optical limiting relative to a bulk sample. The nonlinear transmissions of the capillaries were determined using measurements of the entering and exiting optical energies. The data collected will be compared to previous data taken at shorter wavelengths. Possible models of the mechanism responsible for the observed optical limiting will be discussed.

Nick Forgey (2010, T): Marsh 201@10:00 AM

Title: Let?s Talk Sports: A Study of the Prevalence of Race within Everyday Conversations of Sport
Major(s): Sociology
Advisor(s): Whitehead
Abstract: Understanding the way in which people talk about race within everyday conversations of sport may provide valuable insight into the current state of race relations in our society. Because of its ever-growing popularity around the world and its racially charged atmosphere, sports provide a context in which racism can either be challenged or perpetuated. It is the goal of this project to observe sports fans in their own environment and note the ways in which race is articulated, or avoided, within this context. By conducting an ethnographic study that utilizes participant observation as its means of data collection, this project identifies the ways in which individuals talk overtly about race, maneuver around the topic of race, and/or refuse to acknowledge racial difference altogether. In doing so, this project hopes to achieve a higher level of understanding, particularly of the significance of sport in our society and its relation to racism.

Bradly Forkner (2009, T): Marsh 201@11:00 AM

Title: Finding the Fag: Gaydar in Rural America
Major(s): Sociology
Advisor(s): Rafalovich
Abstract: Gay identification relies on the use of symbols. Just as certain activities or modes of dress are labeled “masculine” or “feminine” – particular behaviors, styles, actions, and language use are labeled “gay.” However, it is clear that signs, symbols, attitudes, and behaviors do not mean the same thing everywhere across the world. This is also true for behaviors associated with gay identity. While in one location, particular behaviors, styles, and language use may denote the label of “gay,” they do not necessarily create the same label in another location, where those actions and signifiers have been interpreted to mean something different. In this study I will investigate gay identification practices among self-identified heterosexuals across rural locations. I will use a micro-level design with data collected via face-to-face interviews to find out what symbols and interpretive frameworks rural Americans rely upon to identify what, or who, is considered gay.

Eva Forrester (2014, T): Strain 121@11:00 AM

Title: The Mathematics of Decision-Making
Major(s): Mathematics
Advisor(s): Besse
Abstract: Linear programming has been widely recognized as one of the most important scientific advances of the mid-20th century. This remarkable field in mathematics has given rise to the tools that have become industry standard in the field of Operations Research. These tools have application to a broad class of decision-making problems pertinent to nearly all industries. The most common type of application involves the general problem of allocating limited resources among competing activities in the best possible (i.e. optimal) way. Our research examines the mathematical theory behind linear programming as well as the many forms these problems can assume. The logic and methods for solving such optimization problems are then discussed in the context of applications to business and manufacturing.

Valerie Fournier (2013, T): Berglund 232@1:30 PM

Title: Theatrics in the Classroom: A Self-Study on Using Dramatic Arts Instruction in the Classroom
Major(s): FG. Education and Learning
Advisor(s): Zijdemans Boudreau
Abstract: What is the impact of dramatic art instruction on student content retention, motivation and engagement? This study explored these themes at an elementary school level. Two third grade classrooms became the setting for a six-week investigation on how to infuse dramatic arts into a math and science curriculum. After a series of observations to become familiar with the classroom and students, the researcher worked collaboratively with each teacher, meeting weekly to discuss content area and develop ideas for infusing dramatic activity to reinforce the various concepts. Other data collected included three student surveys during the course of the project, teacher and student interviews, and four teacher surveys and observations. Two analytic memos were also written for this project. This data, in addition to the researcher's observations, were used to examine how students were responding to dramatic arts instruction as well as how much of the subject they were retaining with this particular approach. The outcomes suggest that dramatic arts instruction is a very useful method for teaching math and science, increases engagement, motivation, and perhaps even the subject knowledge retained. Though the teachers used in this study acknowledge that this method is valuable in the classroom, there is some question about a teacher's background in art and comfort level in using this method. Finally, this method shows promise as an effective classroom management strategy; in this case, through the use of a mimicking clapping rhythm and designing an "ACT" poster ("Active listening, Courteous words, Talk before you act") for the classroom.

Valerie Fournier (2013, T): Warner 28@10:00 AM

Title: Theatre Workshops in Local Community Grade Schools
Major(s): Theatre
Advisor(s): Margolis
Abstract: In this project, two practitioners took their knowledge and talents to a local charter school for a ten-week children's theatre workshop and a high school to put on a four week long Readers Theatre workshop. In both of these workshops, participants learned various aspects of theatre, such as history, technical design, different acting practices, production, costume design, and script analysis. These workshops were aimed towards schools that had recently undergone large theatre budget cuts. A blog was formed for the children's theatre workshop to keep parents informed of activities and for the practitioners to maintain written progress about the workshop. The goal of these projects was to inspire and influence future generations on the preservation of theatrical art.

Adam Fox (2007, T): Marsh 201@1:30 PM

Title: Ethnographic Analysis of Contemporary Ecuadorian Political Symbols
Major(s): Anthropology
Advisor(s): Mahar


Abstract: Using ethnographic research methods, this research analyzes contemporary political symbols used by indigenous populations in Ecuador and how they influence ethnic identity. In particular, this study emphasizes the symbols used in protests against the Free Trade Agreement negotiations of March 2006. Historically, Ecuador has been a country prone to political upheaval, demonstrations, and protests. It is the manner in which ethnic minorities express their political ideas. Through such expression, political symbols are either adapted or created to convey meanings. Political symbols carry wide-ranging cultural values and beliefs and can provide insight into ethnic identity and the relation of indigenous groups to the larger society. My hypothesis is that the symbols that are more accurately interpreted by individuals outside of the indigenous group will have a higher cultural value, influence, and permanence. Cultural value and permanence will also increase the cultural and political capital that the symbol carries. My central research question is: how do political symbols carry cultural and political capital, and how does this process affect cultural/ethnic identity and recognition for the indigenous group as a minority population. The research has been conducted through content analysis of archival and internet data, open-ended structured interviews through email, and has been complimented by participant observation.

Leia Franchini (2011, T): CLIC@1:00 PM

Title: Postmortem Care: A Ritual Created by Medical Subculture
Major(s): Anthropology
Advisor(s): Mahar
Abstract: American culture primarily functions in a scientific belief system, where all phenomena can be explained via the natural sciences, and death is the end of biological life. If death is the termination of life; death is also the cessation of the "American dream." Subsequently, death becomes an act of deviance and is ostracized to the medical institution. American rituals associated with the human corpse have been lost. Healthcare providers are now the primary caregivers to the dying and the corpse. Since death rituals are no longer supplied by American culture, medical professionals have created their own rituals in the form of medical procedures. This research seeks to understand how postmortem care, a scientifically based medical procedure, is a ritual utilized by healthcare providers to normalize, and assign meaning to, death in a culture where dying is deviant behavior. Data is gathered qualitatively via participant observation, focus groups and interviews. Analysis of data relies heavily on the discipline of thanatology as well as incorporating theories of symbolic anthropology and social interactionism.

Daniel Frangipani (2010, T): McGill Auditorium@2:30 PM

Title: Congestion Pricing in the Portland Metropolitan Area
Major(s): Economics
Advisor(s): Haag
Abstract: The Portland Metropolitan area is characterized by high peak hour demand on the main arteries where capacity exceeds demand, and low off peak demand. Models will be constructed using data provided by ODOT traffic counts and traffic flow charts to determine the main bottlenecks and time intervals when the bottlenecks occur. The aim of the model is to seek ways to improve traffic flow throughout the Portland Metropolitan Area promising to yield great economic benefits in the form of reducing travel costs and increasing business activity in the area. The analysis is based on an estimated implementation of congestion pricing in the Portland Metropolitan area and the publics reaction to congestion pricing.

Julie Kalei Frank (2010, T): Marsh 201@10:30 AM

Title: Parenting and Gender Roles
Major(s): Sociology
Advisor(s): Whitehead
Abstract: Parenting and gender roles from the 1980’s have changed a significant amount compared to parenting and gender roles of today. The television sitcoms that were selected for this project represented the typical family of that time. The methods used for this project was a qualitative research approach. In this project there were 30 total sitcoms watched. 15 of the sitcoms were watched from the 1980’s and 15 sitcoms were watched from today. In 1980’s sitcoms both parents equally nurtured their children. In today’s sitcoms most parents split their nurturing roles between their children. Mothers only talk to and nurture their daughters and fathers only talk to and nurture their sons. The way a mother nurtures her daughter is very different than the way a fathers nurtures his son. As more and more sitcoms were reviewed patterns developed. Areas of study that I have drawn from are sociology of family and sociology of gender.

Jilinda Franklin (2013, T): Marsh LL5@10:00 AM

Title: Nature Compositions
Major(s): Art
Advisor(s): Iijima
Abstract: Throughout my exploration I have had a general theme of working with nature whether that is drawing landscapes or cutting out leaves and flowers for jewelry. One of the primary reasons I am attracted to nature is because I grew up in the country and always find things in the outdoors appealing, comforting, and symbolic. The pieces I create have individualistic qualities yet relate to or contribute to a larger meaning when combined with other elements. An example is how each leaf is unique, just like people, yet they can be on the same tree or from the same family. I discovered how school is like a big pile of leaves. All the people have different backgrounds, ethnicities, genders, and majors and whether they planned it or not, they all come together into one place.

John Fredericks (2011, T): Berglund 232@1:00 PM

Title: Gendered Guns: Voluntaristic Action or Forced Discrimination
Major(s): Sociology
Advisor(s): Whitehead
Abstract: Women's roles within the gun world have been rapidly increasing in the last few decades. From the inclusion of women-based outdoorsman and hunting TV series to the mass production of pink firearms, women have recently been brought into the crosshairs of the gun business as the new market demographic. Although women, historically, have been a part of the gun world (i.e. as wives and girlfriends), this rapid increase in direct female participation may not be so welcomed by all existing gun wielders, which by majority are overwhelmingly male. This study aims to test Janet Saltzman Chafetz's theory of Voluntaristic Gender Inequality within the cultures of gun collection and gun shows to see if women's participation and/or exclusion is based on personal decision making or gender-based discrimination. This theory will be tested via the use of a deductive, qualitative analysis through methods such as ethnographic observations and in-depth, face-to-face interviews. Conclusions from this study will be applicable to the professional field of sociology as well as contribute to a general understanding of gun ownership and women's roles within the gun culture. Despite some common misconceptions of gun advocates and gun collectors as being radical, right-winged zealots, this study should also shed light on the fact that most gun collectors view their possessions as art rather than tools of destruction.

Trux French (2013, P): Strain Hall 3rd Floor@11:00 AM

Title: Synthesis and Analysis of High Oxidation States of Nickel
Major(s): Chemistry
Advisor(s): Whiteley
Abstract: Batteries are the most common form of portable, energy storage. One of the main types of batteries involve the use of nickel as a part of the cathode. The nickel in a charged battery is made up of nickel (III) oxide, which is a great oxidizer, and therefore pulls electrons causing a current. This then becomes nickel (II) hydroxide. During the charging process electrons are removed from the cathode, which is in a solution of electrolytes. These electrolyte ions are believed to embed themselves into the nickel (III) peroxide structure, which will cause the nickel in cathode to have various and different charges. My project involves synthesizing nickel (III) peroxide in 2 different ways, chemically and electrochemically, in various hydroxide electrolytes. I have analyzed these samples by thermogravametric means and with an ICP to help determine the stoichiometry of the different nickel oxide powders to see if there is a difference in the chemistry of these products

Thomas Frison (2012, T): Strain 121@9:00 AM

Title: User Manipulated Academic Planner for Pacific University (UMAP)
Major(s): Computer Science
Advisor(s): Khoja
Abstract: Imagine if instead of planning your classes one or two semesters at a time, you could create a plan for your entire time at Pacific. That's the goal of UMAP. Using a combination of PHP, JavaScript, HTML, and a MySQL database built from actual Pacific University course information, UMAP allows a student or adviser to choose a combination of majors and minors and view a graphical representation of what classes should be taken in each semester. If the user decides they want to take a class in a different term than the planner suggests, he or she may simply drag the class to another semester when it is available and the tool will move other classes around to keep requirements fulfilled. UMAP does not include core or focal studies requirements. This presentation will cover the process I went through to design and create UMAP as well as a short demonstration.

Ryan Fritz (2007, T): Price 202@4:00 PM

Title: House of Peace and Love Project
Major(s): Media Arts
Advisor(s): Hibbard
Abstract: Five years ago Jay Rubin, long time friend, and I created a non-profit organization under the name of GoodLuck Enterprises. With this organization Mr. Rubin and I were able to create an annual event occurring in Portland, OR that helps to raise money for the Juhudi School, the House of Peace and Love Community Center, and Learning Centers throughout Tanzania, Africa. The event is now known as the Portland Challenge happening in mid August of every year. In January of 2007 I traveled to East Africa to see what progress was being made with the money raised in Portland, OR over the last five years. The images and video that were captured have been put on the official website of the House of Peace and Love Project at Houseofpeaceandlove.com. These videos are meant to be informational so that potential donors may see where donated money has gone.

Emily Friz (2009, T): Price 202@3:00 PM

Title: A General Method for the Rapid Reduction of Alkenes and Alkynes Using Sodium Borohydride, Acetic Acid, and Palladium
Major(s): Chemistry
Advisor(s): Cordes
Abstract: Alkenes and alkynes are rapidly reduced to the corresponding alkanes using sodium borohydride and acetic acid in the presence of a small amount of palladium catalyst. The heterogeneous reaction is conducted in open air at room temperature. Reactions typically afford conversions to the alkane product of 98% or more within 15 minutes. The best solvent system was determined to be isopropyl alcohol, though reduction also takes place in solvents such as tetrahydrofuran, chloroform and, with some substrates, even in water. The method described is a convenient alternative to hydrogenations that require an external supply of hydrogen gas.

Trevor Frodsham (2014, T): Berglund 230@9:00 AM

Title: Centro Cultural de Washington County: A Marketing to Volunteers
Major(s): Business
Advisor(s): Griffie
Abstract: Nonprofit organizations have helped millions of people over the years, and without volunteers most of these organizations would not be able to function. Centro Cultural de Washington County is the quintessential example of these life-changing organizations. The Latino population of Washington County has increased dramatically in recent years and Centro Cultural is dedicated to educating and assisting Latinos of all ages. With our project, we will present recommendations to Centro that provide tools to facilitate their marketing to potential volunteers. We are developing a template for redesigning the volunteer page on their website. Additionally, we are updating job descriptions, creating a calendar where volunteers can sign up right on Centro's website. The last aspect of our marketing project will be developing an updatable tri-fold which Centro can take to places such as volunteer fairs to promote positions are available and how their efforts will benefit the Latino community. The purpose of this project is to help Centro market themselves to potential volunteers, thus allowing them to continue to work toward achieving the goal of increasing volunteer participation.

Stacia Fry (2011, T): Taylor Auditorium: Marsh 216@1:00 PM

Title: The Regret4: Kill is Love
Major(s): Media Arts: Film and Video Production
Advisor(s): Hardacker
Vaisburd
Abstract: A lonely assassin must hunt down her entire family and kill them in cold blood as an initiation to join the most elite group of assassins in the world. She accomplishes the unthinkable. This film is greatly influenced by the work of Quentin Tarantino film whose work I have been constantly entertained and moved by, in particular, I have been inspired by Tarantino's use, or misuse, of various genres and film movements. Like Tarantino, I was more than just the director of this project: I was the cinematographer, editor, producer, and writer as well. My main emphasis for this project was cinematography and art direction, which utilized skills I've acquired through both Pacific and my own adventures and studies of the film industry.

Stephanie Fryman (2013, P): Strain Hall 2nd Floor@3:00 PM

Title: The Effects of the Phytoestrogen Genistein on Breast Cancer
Major(s): Biology
Advisor(s): Baugher
Abstract: Breast cancer is a deadly disease that currently affects 1 in 8 women in the United States. Studies show that many environmental and genetic factors can influence breast cancer risk, either predisposing women to this disease or decreasing cancer risk. Furthermore, evidence suggests that specific chemical compounds found in Western diets have a significant impact on cancer risk. One family of these compounds is known as the phytoestrogens. Phytoestrogens are secondary plant metabolites produced by plants that are similar in structure to estrogen and can modulate estrogen signaling. Common dietary sources of phytoestrogens include soy products, nut, legumes, cereals, and breads. Interestingly, some phytoestrogens seem to promote breast cancer, while others seem to decrease the risk. One of these controversial phytoestrogens is genistein, commonly found in soy. The role of this compound in breast cancer is not very well understood. This review aims to understand the role of genistein in breast cancer, and to determine whether the inclusion of this compound in the diet is harmful or helpful.

Allison Fujimoto (2011, T): Berglund 200@9:00 AM

Title: Roots and Routes: Re-defining Ethnic Identity in Contemporary American Immigrant Fiction
Major(s): English: Literature
Advisor(s): Pagan
Abstract: This critical thesis examines three major works of contemporary American immigrant fiction that reflect a way of understanding ethnic identity for racial minorities as a conscious, active choice. This thesis is divided into five sections. The first is an analytical introduction that frames this genre of literature and its concept of ethnic identity in a historical and sociological context. Following the introduction, a section is devoted to an examination of each of the three novels: "The Kite Runner" by Khaled Hosseini, "The Bonesetter's Daughter" by Amy Tan, and "The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao" by Junot Diaz. This thesis concludes with a discussion that compares and contrasts all three novels and re-iterates the importance of this topic as it affects individuals on a personal level and society as a whole.

Kiah Fujita (2014, P): Price 1st Floor Hallway@11:00 AM

Title: Music…"The Legal Performance Enhancing Drug"
Major(s): Exercise Science
Advisor(s): Jackson
Abstract: We live in a time when technology has brought us closer to music than ever before, enshrining its role in our emotional and social lives (DeNora & Bergh, 2009). Many Americans have incorporated music into their exercise domain. We see people running with iPods strapped to their arm, lifting weights with earphones in their ears, and even performing dance aerobics. We know that music may make the exercise more enjoyable, but does it actually enhance our performance? It has been said that music is the only "legal performance-enhancing drug", due to it's numerous beneficial effects. Research has shown that music can benefit athletic performance because it distracts the athlete from the simultaneous exercise-associated sensation of fatigue (Karageoghis, 2012), and listening to motivational music could increase a person's muscular and aerobic endurance (Crust & Clough, 2006). In addition, music can be beneficial in the realm of recovery, where listening to high tempo music motivates athletes to continue moving, lowering blood lactate levels, leading to faster recovery (Eliakim, 2012). Although the physical benefits of music on performance have been well studied, few studies have examined how music can affect a person's ability to perform cognitive tasks. How does the cognitive effect compare to the positive effects show in the physical domain? Purpose: To determine the effects of music tempo on performance of physical and cognitive tasks. Method: Pacific University students performed four tasks (2 cognitive, 2 physical) within each of four different music conditions in a counter-balanced order. Their heart rate, rating of perceived exertion (RPE), and task performance such as accuracy and time to complete were analyzed. Data Analysis: Data will be analyzed for differences in performance among the four music tempo conditions. Results and Conclusion: Will be presented as to which music tempo elicits the best performance in physical and cognitive tasks. These results will help individuals find the right type of music that will help them enhance their aerobic stamina, muscular endurance, and problem solving skills.

Derrin Fukuda (2007, T): Taylor Auditorium: Marsh 216@11:00 AM

Title: The Effects of a Flag Football Program on Empathy and Aggression in Elementary School Males
Major(s): Psychology
Advisor(s): Burns-Glover


Abstract: The aim of present study is to assess an after-school program that will help us better understand how to improve social-cognitive development of children, with the goal of promoting empathetic behaviors, that is, behaviors that are pro- rather than anti-social. The two constructs of empathy and aggression are proposed to be indirectly related (Strayer & Roberts, 2004; Hastings et al., 2000; Miller & Eisenberg, 1988). In childhood, a deficit in empathy may develop into more serious behavior problems. Specific interventions based on reducing levels of violence and increasing pro-social behavior have been effective approaches to counteract the development of aggression (Eisenberg and Morris, 2001). Little systematic attention has been paid to using boys' natural play behaviors (e.g., football) to mediate and scaffold social and academic skill-building. This study attempted to apply theories of pro-social skill-building to a "real world" after-school program and to develop a practical intervention to reduce aggression and increase pro-social skills in at risk boys, using the medium of "flag football" and academic mentoring in a combined after-school program.

Andrea Fukuhara (2010, T): Price 203@2:30 PM

Title: Leptin Transport Associated Obesity
Major(s): Biology
Advisor(s): Scholnick
Abstract: Leptin is a crucial hormone that regulates food intake, metabolism, energy expenditure, weight maintenance, and body composition. Leptin is secreted from adipocytes into the blood stream and acts on the central and peripheral nervous system via hypothalamic pathways. To reach the brain, leptin must pass the blood brain barrier. Hypometabolism and hyperphagia can result when leptin is unable to pass through the blood brain barrier due to disruptions in leptin receptors. Hypometabolism and hyperphagia are two major factors that contribute to morbid obesity. For my senior thesis, I will examine how obesity results from decreased leptin transport across the blood brain barrier and how disruptions to leptin receptors can be tied to dramatic changes in body composition.

Mark Fukui (2013, T): Price 202@10:30 AM

Title: Human Walking Economy: Effect of Regulated Stride Frequencies at Self-selected Speeds
Major(s): Exercise Science
Advisor(s): Schot
Abstract: Human walking has been modeled as a force driven oscillating pendulum. The resonant swing frequency (RSF) of the leg-pendulum model and the preferred stride frequency (PSF) when walking appear, on average, to be statistically equivalent for humans and other animals. This has led to conclusions that humans are self-optimizing, but the lack of mean differences does not indicate that individuals are actually using the RSF for the PSF. In fact, correlations between the RSF and PSF prove to be remarkably weak. These results and other methodological concerns prompted us to re-examine the influence of stride frequency on walking economy. Purpose: To examine walking economy at various regulated stride frequencies at, above and below the RSF based on the most frequently applied leg-pendulum model. Methods: 24 adult volunteers participated. Anthropometric measures needed to model the RSF and resting heart rate were taken. At a separate session participants walked on a level treadmill at 4 regulated stride frequencies (.83RSF, 1.0RSF, 1.17RSF and 1.34RSF), but were always allowed to self-select the walking speed. Walking continued at such speed until a steady state heart rate condition was achieved. Various gait and physiologic measures were then taken to determine economy. Analysis: Repeated measures ANOVA was used to assess the influence of stride frequency on economy. Results: Findings will be delivered at the time of the presentation.

Chantell Fukumae (2012, T): Berglund 230@1:00 PM

Title: I Have Rights Too: A Look into the Barriers to Housing and Employment for Individuals with Criminal Backgrounds
Major(s): Social Work
Advisor(s): Schweitzer
Abstract: Once a person is cuffed and locked away for a time surpassing twelve months, they have been charged with a felony. As a felon, one is left to deal with the stigma and discrimination of rights entailed with their criminal conviction. This is particularly harmful in the workplace and access to housing. Despite the willingness of individuals to overcome their past and seek success in their future, there are implicit and explicit barriers which make reintegration difficult and recidivism easy. The lasting collateral damage derived from felony convictions take form in the rights that are denied to this vulnerable population which include: loss of rights to vote, to serve as a juror, hold public office, right to possess a firearm, and a denial of access to government grants. Also, on a more subtle level it is common for employers and housing personnel to deny convicted felons employment and access into affordable housing. The recent economic recession has only exacerbated these issues. Understanding the specific challenges to employment and housing will lead to more effective intervention. This Senior Capstone project details responses of individuals with felony convictions within a focus group; a focus group that examines specific barriers to housing and employment during the present-day economic climate. In giving participants a voice can we truly understand their needs.

Jayson Fukumoto (2011, T): Marsh 101@9:00 AM

Title: A Social Relationships Intervention Program for Bullying: Lifeskills Field Day.
Major(s): Psychology
Advisor(s): Burns-Glover
Abstract: Rising concerns about the incidence of bullying in schools prompted a collaboration between a rural elementary school and local university. College students designed and implemented a social-relationships building "field day" of activities to address problem solving, friendship skills, and bystander intervention . Pre-test data from three sixth-grade classes (N=85) were collected. The pre intervention questionnaire assessed current perceptions of bullying; students' goals for the new year, and their perception of their current academic, social and extracurricular skills Bullying was experienced and observed most often on the playground. The school climate was one of a "code silence" about bullying: while school stakeholders reported problems, the majority of kids (70.5%) report never being bullied, however 48.2% reported seeing others bullied. Only 47% believed it was a problem at their school. Students were asked what could be done to reduce bullying (31% mode was adult intervention and 25% gave no response). The intervention addressed these perceptions and post-participation narratives were coded to assess a) which activities they enjoyed; b) what they learned about another person and c) what they learned about themselves. We compared these with ongoing data and perceptions from school teachers, counselors. Several themes emerged: increased social skills and awareness about peers; discovering leadership potential in self and others; and frequent mentions of "trust," cooperation and teamwork.

Jordan Fukumoto (2014, T): Price 204@3:30 PM

Title: Effect of 6-Week Stretching Program on Muscular Force
Major(s): Exercise Science
Advisor(s): Henry
Abstract: Independently, resistance training has been shown to increase muscular force whereas stretching has been shown to increase flexibility (range of motion). Some researchers have suggested that stretching may also have a role in increasing muscular force. For example, if stretching not only enhanced muscle fiber length (sarcomeres added in series), but also improved muscle physiological cross-sectional area (sarcomeres added in parallel), increased muscular strength would be the result. Surprisingly, there are few studies that systematically investigate the potential additive effects of stretching coupled with resistance training. Purpose: The purpose of our study was to combine a post-workout stretching program with resistance training, examining the possible synergistic effect on muscular force. Methods: Twenty-one healthy, moderately trained students participated in this 6-week study. A within-subject design was used in this study; the subject's body was divided in half and one side (e.g. right) randomly assigned as control and contralateral side (e.g. left) as experimental. For six weeks, and at least three times per week, subjects engaged in symmetrical bilateral resistance training of the targeted muscle groups. For the intervention, subjects performed three sets of 30-second stretches (bicep, pectoralis major, and gastrocnemius) immediately after resistance training only on their assigned experimental side. The non-stretched side served as control. Each subject performed a pre-test and six week post-test for one rep-max (1RM), range of motion, girth, maximal voluntary isometric contraction, and muscular endurance. Repeated measures ANOVA compared pre and post test for the control and experimental leg. Results & Conclusion: To be presented.

Luke Fuller (2011, T): McGill Auditorium@9:00 AM

Title: Building a Demonstration Living Roof
Major(s): Environmental Studies
Advisor(s): O'Day
Abstract: Despite the popularity of composite shingle and wood shingle roofing, this form of traditional roofing poses many problems. The materials used are not environmentally sound, the roof does not last long, and the roof will contribute to the urban heat island effect, among many other problems. To address these problems, a living roof is a viable alternative to the traditional roof. Through research and practical application I have demonstrated that living roofs are a more environmentally sound viable alternative to traditional roofs. At Pacific University's B Street Farm I have constructed a working model of a living roof, a roof that will provide shelter for the Farm's rabbit and earthworm population. The construction of this living roof was relatively simple, will last for a long time, and is aesthetically pleasing to the Farm's many visitors and volunteers. If more people throughout the community were to utilize a living roof as opposed to a traditional roof it would reduce anthropogenic environmental degradation, reduce roofing costs, increase available planting space, reduce the urban heat island effect, and help to reduce the amount of carbon in our atmosphere.

Alex Furstenberg (2012, T): Berglund 200@11:30 AM

Title: Moby-Dick: A Symbol of Ambiguity in an Unfathomable Universe
Major(s): English: Literature
Advisor(s): Boersema
Abstract: In our oceans there exist underwater islands. These islands travel in groups. They can live up to seventy years old, reach lengths of sixty-seven feet, and can way up to sixty tons. These rogue continents are living creatures; they are sperm whales. The sperm whale is so large it can almost be classified in geographical terms. As for the white sperm whale and major antagonist of Herman Melville's novel Moby-Dick, the whale is as great of an enigma as he is in size. Argued to symbolize everything from God, fate, nature, the ocean, and the entire universe, the antagonist Moby-Dick is truly a mystery. What did Melville intend this legendary leviathan to represent? The whale is in fact a symbol of ambiguity itself; a symbol of ambiguity which conveys the unfathomable nature of the universe.

Alex Furstenberg (2012, T): Library Conference@3:00 PM

Title:  Banksy: An Artist of Resistance
Major(s): Philosophy
Advisor(s): Boersema
Abstract: Graffiti, like every other medium, can be used to create both good and bad art. It can also be used to tag fences and public buildings with meaningless messages, names, symbols, and slogans by pranksters and gangs alike. An aerosol can in the hands of the mysterious England-based graffiti artist known only by his pseudo name Banksy, however, is a weapon for what some may call an artist of resistance: a masked pioneer who displays their political message illegally in the form of street art. Street art, as commonly occurring in unsanctioned public space, is considered by many to be simply vandalism and not art. My central claim to this paper, however, is that graffiti and the street art created by Bansky, is not only art, but is good art, and is Art of Resistance in both its form and its content.

Devin Furutani (2014, T): Marsh 106@2:30 PM

Title: "WTF!?" Faculty and Student Attitudes about what Constitutes Professional Etiquette
Major(s): Psychology
Advisor(s): Island
Abstract: More than half of the world's population uses mobile or smart phone devices. This means in an instant we can answer questions, access our social networks, take a photograph, read email, and order merchandise. The generational cohort currently in college, the Millennial Generation, grew up with social media, Internet, Google searches, and cell phones. Yet, their professors, largely Generation X and Baby Boomers grew up with less informational immediacy, greater professional and expert separation. Consequently etiquette, professional behavior, and expectations regarding the contextual use of technology vary across generations. Among non-Millennial generation professors, attitudes toward information immediacy technology (e.g., cell phones, laptops, and their associated software platforms) in the classroom differ. Some encourage the use of laptops, but not cellphones, still others have strict classroom policies that prohibit the use of any electronic technology. Students often argue that mobile or laptop access is an integral part of the learning experience, both within and outside the classroom. Electronic textbooks, Internet search engines, online dictionaries, calculators, and recording devices can facilitate both learning and offer alternative, less expensive resources. The restriction of these devices can hurt student-professor rapport and classroom morale. Since students are consumers of their education, the restriction of technology in the classroom may be perceived as disrespectful or a demonstration of the power differential in the class. Thus, the purpose of this project is to better understand the different perspectives between students and professors relative to immediate information technology and its role both in and outside of the classroom.

Eric Furuya (2012, T): Price 204@9:30 AM

Title: The Relationship Between Leadership Preferences and Mental Toughness in Division III athletes
Major(s): Exercise Science
Advisor(s): Concepcion
Abstract: Mental toughness is an important set of psychological characteristics necessary for successful athletic performance and is distinguished by an unshakeable self-belief, an internalized motivation to succeed, intense focus on task, and to thrive under pressure (Jones, et al., 2002). Research has show that has shown that coaches play a role in the development of athletes' mental toughness through support and encouragement in and outside of practice and during competition (Gould, Hodge, Peterson & Petlichkoff, 1987). Azadi and Lee (2009) studied UK collegiate and club-level athletes utilizing a measure of leadership preferences and metal toughness. They found that athletes' preference for training and instruction were predicted by the MT subscales of commitment and challenge. The purpose of this research project was to explore these relationships in a sample of American NCAA Division III athletes? After IRB approval was obtained, data were gathered through on online surevey site. Results and conclusions will be presented on Senior Projects Day 2012.

Michael Furuya (2013, T): McGill Auditorium@2:30 PM

Title: Bokashi: An Alternative for Handling Organic Waste at Pacific University
Major(s): Environmental Studies w/ Sustainable Design Emphasis
Advisor(s): Gundersen
Abstract: In the United States we throw away an estimated 40% of our food. According to the Natural Resources Defense Council, this creates about $165 million worth of organic waste. Bokashi is a Japanese term meaning fermented organic matter and is a process that eliminates problems from conventional composting. Bokashi is an accepted form of composting but the EPA does not list it as an organic waste handling method. Boxer Dining donates their organic waste to a pig farmer, but presents the case that their operation is considered sustainable compared to composting their organic waste based on the EPA's food waste chart. To counter this problem, I conducted a pilot study to transport 10 gallons of Boxer Dining's organic waste on a weekly basis to the B-Street Permaculture Farm utilizing the Bokashi method. The goal of my project was to educate Pacific University students and faculty and advocate for Bokashi being an environmentally friendly solution for handling organic waste. The pilot study proved that Bokashi produced usable compost within one week and is evidence that it can become a part of Pacific University's organic waste handling system.

Grant Gabriel (2014, T): Taylor Auditorium: Marsh 216@10:00 AM

Title: Website redesign for the Hillsboro Farmers' Market
Major(s): Media Arts: Integrated Media
Advisor(s): Geraci
Abstract: Hillsboro Farmers' Market has provided local farmers, artisans, and family-owned businesses an openhearted environment to offer their produce, arts, crafts, and local products to the community. Their main goal is to educate patrons on farm practices, sustainability, and the values of buying locally. In order to reflect their success as an organization, the people behind HFM have looked to update their identity with a revamped logo and brand style guide. This also included the need to re-design their website. For my senior project, I looked to create a website that embraces the excellent reputation of HFM and mirror their newly minted identity. In my presentation I will discuss the process by which I created the new website. From communicating with the staff at HFM, to designing and implementing the new design, I will cover everything I've accomplished so far and discuss the future launch of the finished site.

Kelsey Galago (2014, T): Berglund 232@2:30 PM

Title: Bullying Within School Systems: Implementing an anti-bullying curriculum to prevent long-term effects of bullying
Major(s): Social Work
Advisor(s): Schweitzer
Abstract: Research reports there are currently over 3.2 million students who are victims of bullying. The U.S. Department of Education states that out of all middle and high school students, 65.7 percent have been bullied and 13.3 percent are bullied almost everyday. Research shows that bullying may have a long-term effect on serious illness, struggling to hold down a job and poor social relationships. Research also suggests that preventing and detecting bullying at a young age will decrease the risk factors' long-term effect. This Senior Capstone project developed an intervention to prevent bullying from a grassroots perspective. Additionally, this intervention focuses on incorporating an anti-bullying curriculum geared around Hawaiian values. One challenge to this intervention includes the delivery and connection of Hawaiian language and traditions to the effects of bullying. Limitations and next steps will also be discussed.

Cassandra Gallegos (2014, T): Berglund 145@10:00 AM

Title: Agriculture and Society:The Ethical Necessity of Recognizing Interdependence & Closing the Urban-Rural Gap
Major(s): Philosophy
Environmental Studies
Advisor(s): Ilea
Van Dyk
Abstract: In this thesis I will be arguing that urban voters should work with, rather than against, rural communities in the United States. This will help to create a responsible, equitable society where differences in geographical areas do not prevent people from working together to pass sustainable agricultural policies that ensure a more ethically-conscious community that values the ethical treatment of animals and the environment. Instead of leaving our agro-ecological systems ordering to the free-market, the integrated approach between urban and rural communities may help to put control of the agro-industrial sector back into the hands of the people and communities that comprise the agricultural market. I will use the normative theory called consequentialism to provide rational reasons and justifications for why we ought to change our current agricultural policies. I believe this theory can help us to create just policies that favor and support more environmentally friendly and sustainable methods, while also helping to sustain "family" farms. I argue in favor of passing federal legislation to enforce structural changes, to promote and enforce more sustainable agricultural practices. In a democratic society, where community involvement matters, we need society to work together in order to make the changes in order to mitigate some of the pressures that are behind the environmental crisis we are facing.

Alexander Gallini-Burdick (2012, T): Strain 121@9:30 AM

Title: Android Malware Alert Scanning Software (AMASS)
Major(s): Computer Science
Advisor(s): Khoja
Abstract: With each new gadget and computing device we use in our daily lives the threat of someone else using that technology against us grows ever greater. Smartphones in particular have recently become the target of such malicious attacks in the form of viruses, worms, and trojans. AMASS is an application developed for smartphones running the Android operating system. It locates malicious applications in order to alert the user of their presence to prevent them from doing damage to your phone or stealing your information. AMASS uses a signature based detection procedure with signatures stored in a B-tree to identify malicious applications. Topics related to malicious software in general as well as attacks and prevention methods specific to Android will be discussed during the presentation.

Katherine Galvan (2012, T): Marsh 201@4:00 PM

Title: Double Ethnic Identity
Major(s): Sociology
Advisor(s): Rafalovich
Abstract: Hispanic Americans living in the United States are often faced with an ethnic identity crisis. They must balance their Hispanic culture and the American one at the same time. This issue is important because it is something that most first and second generation Hispanics experience but never talk about. Therefore it is an issue that needs to be brought up to enlighten the Hispanic population and help other ethnic minorities who feel stuck between two different cultures. As well as present an issue that Caucasian Americans might have not thought about beforehand. Taking a macro issue I wanted to see its relevance to the Forest Grove community. I looked at Forest Grove High School graduates who are currently in college. I conducted 10 in depth, qualitative interviews. The questions in my interviews were designed to measure the amount of assimilation to the dominant culture. My findings conclude that this double ethnic identity is also applicable to graduates of Forest Grove High School.

Katherine Galvan (2012, T): Marsh 101@11:30 AM

Title: Double Ethnic Identity
Major(s): World Languages: Spanish
Advisor(s): Christoph
Abstract: First and second generation Hispanic Americans living in the Unites States are often faced with an ethnic identity crisis. They must balance their Hispanic culture and the American one at the same time. This issue is important to the social sciences because it is something that most first and second generation Hispanics experience but never talk about or know how to deal with it. Often times they just put it in the back of their minds. Nonetheless it is an issue that needs to be studied and discussed, not only to enlighten the Hispanic population, but also to help other ethnic minorities who feel as though they are stuck between two different cultures. This study explores how the issue of biculturalism or "double ethnic identity" is manifested in the Forest Grove community. Specifically, I looked at Forest Grove High School graduates who are currently in college. I conducted 10 in-depth, qualitative interviews that aimed to assess the amount of assimilation by Latinos to the dominant Anglo culture. My findings conclude that the problem of assimilation for immigrant children revolves around language, cultural heritage and racism from the dominant culture. Thus, these elements play a role in how one assimilates and how one defines one's ethnic identity.

Jennie Gamble (2007, T): Price 204@9:30 AM

Title: The Effects of Caffeine on Proprioception
Major(s): Exercise Science
Advisor(s): Henry


Abstract: Caffeine, the most widely used psychoactive drug in the world, is known to affect many systems in the body, including the central nervous system, the cardiovascular system, and both smooth and skeletal muscles. There have been many studies supporting the performance-enhancing characteristics of caffeine, including increased energy, promotion of fat loss, and improved physical endurance (increased time to exhaustion). However, little is understood about the role of caffeine in altering proprioception, which is an inborn kinesthetic awareness of muscle and joint position. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of caffeine on proprioception. Methods: Ten college-age subjects were recruited to participate in a double-blind study consisting of a control condition (powdered sugar placebo) and an experimental condition (caffeine ingestion of 6 mg/kg body weight). Subjects were pre-tested, ingested either caffeine or a placebo, and post-tested 60 minutes after ingestion. Proprioception, via electrogoniometers and computerized data-acquisition system, was assessed by determining movement threshold and ability to reproduce a given angle and angular velocity of knee flexion/extension. Additionally, using a force transducer, the ability to reproduce repeatedly and accurately a sub-maximal force through handgrip was assessed. Data were analyzed via ANOVA for repeated measures, comparing pre-test and post-test data for both caffeine and placebo conditions.

Taz Gample (2013, T): Marsh 106@8:30 AM

Title: It's Only a Toy: Parents' Perspectives of Imitation Firearms
Major(s): Psychology
Advisor(s): Kleinknecht
Abstract: In 2010, an officer shot and wounded a teenager because the teen appeared to be drawing a live firearm, though in reality it was merely an airsoft gun. In response to this situation, Senator Kevin De LZon of California proposed Senate Bill 798, requiring all airsoft guns to be predominantly, if not completely, brightly painted, clearly marking the items as toys. Whereas doing so might help officers better interpret threat in future situations, doing so could pose new problems. When airsoft guns look like harmless toys, will parents be more likely to purchase these items for their children? According to the Elaboration Likelihood Model (e.g., Cacioppo, Petty, & Stoltenberg, 1985), when considering persuasive materials like marketing images, individuals either engage in effortful processing (i.e., central route) or superficial processing (i.e., peripheral route). Multiple factors play into determining which route a consumer might take including stimuli that evoke emotion (Cacioppo, Petty, Kao, & Rodriguez, 1986; Petty, Cacioppo, Sedikids, & Strathman, 1988). Because color elicits emotion (Kaya & Epps, 2004) and positive emotions can stimulate peripheral processing (Petty, et al., 1988), coloring guns in cheerful hues might lead parents to purchase these imitation firearms for younger children. Parents' perceptions of imitation firearms have not been studied in this way. The present study aims to address this gaping issue: do parents find brightly colored airsoft guns to be less dangerous and thus more suitable for younger children? We suspect the answer is "yes" and hypothesize that the coloration of the gun will evoke positive emotion and that parents will be more likely to find the brightly colored guns suitable for younger children. Hypotheses are being tested with a sample of parents of school aged-children. Parents view images of airsoft guns, some realistically colored others brightly colored, and answer questions about the images. Questions target the emotion evoked by the images, the route of processing evoked by the images, and the age-range parents deem suitable for the items pictured. As a society measures must be taken to protect children from harm, and the results of this study provide valuable information for law makers working for this noble cause.

Kody Ganiko (2013, T): Marsh LL5@9:30 AM

Title: Dreamscapes
Major(s): Art
Advisor(s): Flory
Abstract: The thin boundary between reality and fantasy often reminds me of bizarre dreams I have had throughout my life. Images, sensations and emotions created in these dreams were difficult to interpret, but always seemed to linger in my mind. I have seen unique worlds and marched up mysterious pathways. I have ran for my life as horrific creatures scratched at my heels. I listened to my screams echo, as I stood trapped with no one to help me. I felt my heart race as I fell thousands of feet to my doom. I have experienced the grace of flying and attained abilities unimaginable. Craving the boundless possibilities I experienced in dreams, I investigate surrealism through digital photography, photographic manipulation, and photo montage. Inspired by Surrealists, Jerry Ueslmann and Thomas Barbey, My photographs will resurrect unexplored territories of my sub consciousness.

Zach Gantenbein (2009, T): Price 204@1:00 PM

Title: An In Depth Look: A Prime Sieve of the Gaussian Integers
Major(s): Mathematics
Advisor(s): Emmons
Abstract: Around 230 B.C.E. a Greek mathematician named Eratosthenes created the first prime sieve of the integers.  Gaussian integers, (a + bi), have unique prime factorization like the integers.  We combined the Sieve of Eratosthenes and the Gaussian integers in order to create another prime sieve.  By geometrically eliminating multiples of prime Gaussian integers we discover that we are able to uncover the primes in this ring up to any predetermined bound.  

Ashley-Brittney Gapelu (2008, T): Marsh 106@8:30 AM

Title: Tatau in Today's Society
Major(s): Sociology
Advisor(s): Rafalovich


Abstract: This study is centered on the cultural and social significance of Polynesian body art (also known as tatau), in both its traditional form, as well as its modern form. Issues addressed in this study will be the traditional meanings of these particular tattoos, as well as the current meanings. Other issues that will be discussed are of personal significance versus cultural significance, the relationship between the artist and the ‘wearer,’ and ethnic identity. These data will be gathered via face-to-face interviews with participants and through historical library research.

Elizabeth Garber (2014, T): Berglund 216@2:00 PM

Title: Engagement with Interactive Media: Evaluating Pocoyo as an asset to Preschool English Language Learners
Major(s): Education
Advisor(s): Zijdemans Boudreau
Abstract: Over the years, teachers, parents, and the government have attempted to find ways to help English Language Learners (ELL) develop English proficiently. The Pocoyo program, a collaboration between the Early Learning Collaboration and HITV, was designed to assist Spanish-speaking preschool aged students in their acquisition of the English language by incorporating interactive media (Ipad applications), manipulatives, and more based on the TV show Pocoyo. Our research team studied the effectiveness of this program to engage students; our premise being that students learn through engagement. The setting for the study was a public bilingual preschool housed in an elementary school in the state of Oregon. The collaborating teacher designed a transportation unit, based on the Pocoyo program, titled Things That Go and taught it over a three week period to her 16 students, all from migrant families with Spanish as their native language. We developed an engagement rubric to score and record student responses to the Pocoyo materials as we collected the following various data: 1. A first and last trial with the Ipad app; 2. Video recordings of students working with the media; 3. Personal observations of each student's behaviors while using the materials. We also conducted an entry and exit teacher interview, videotaped the teacher's interactions with the students, and collected her final unit assessments. Our goal was to answer the question: How does Pocoyo use its interactive assets to engage Spanish-speaking preschool age students in their acquisition of English? From our interactions with each of the students, we sought to determine whether or not these tools are in fact engaging for these English Language Learners. Our findings suggest that Pocoyo is something that a teacher may use as a component to a lesson or unit, but that on its own it would not be sufficient to teach students the English language. Furthermore, while using Pocoyo preschool students still require a great deal of scaffolding, assistance, and interaction in order to create long-term memories of the target vocabulary words.

Katrina Garcia (2007, T): Strain 121@9:30 AM

Title: Using Blood Plasma as a Non-Destructive Method of Determining Organochlorine Contamination in Adult White Sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus)
Major(s): Environmental Studies
Advisor(s): Gundersen


Abstract: The purpose of this project was to analyze concentrations of organochlorine (OC) pesticides in the blood plasma of white sturgeon from the Columbia and Snake rivers. We also looked at OC concentrations in egg samples from females to look at the relationship between OC levels in eggs and plasma. Plasma sampling is a non-destructive means of monitoring a population for contaminants, which is important for adult white sturgeon, since they are protected by fishing regulations. OC pesticides such as DDT are persistent organic pollutants that remain in the environment long after they are applied, and white sturgeon are particularly susceptible because of their long lives and benthic lifestyle. Plasma samples were collected from several sites near dams on the Columbia and Snake rivers, and results showed significant levels of OCs behind the older dams. OC levels in egg samples correlated significantly with OC levels in plasma. The potential effects of OCs on white-sturgeon populations in the Columbia River Basin will be discussed.

Michael Garcia (2010, T): Price 204@9:00 AM

Title: Why Do Bacteria Produce Antibiotics?
Major(s): Biology
Advisor(s): Baugher
Abstract: In the 1940’s, streptomycete strains commonly found in soil were discovered to produce small molecules that inhibited the growth of other bacteria. The molecules came to be known as antibiotics, and are currently used clinically to cure disease and ease human suffering. The numerous clinical uses for antibiotics lead to the question of why antibiotics are initially produced. Early studies lead investigators to hypothesize that antibiotics produced naturally in soil environments by bacteria are used by these organisms to reduce competition for resources. However, more recent studies have shown that the low concentrations of antibiotics naturally produced by soil bacteria do not act in competitor inhibition, but in other cellular processes such as cell-to-cell signaling. A review of the hypothesis arguing for the natural role of antibiotics as competitive inhibitors will be contrasted against recent findings suggesting antibiotics use in cell-to-cell signaling.

Ryan Garcia (2012, T): Marsh 206@2:00 PM

Title: Electoral College Distortion? The power of the Hispanic Vote in Electing the President
Major(s): Politics and Government
Advisor(s): Van Dyk
Seward
Abstract: Although there has been constant academic and political discussion surrounding the current method of electing the president, the election of 2000 (Bush v. Gore) re-instigated the debate; this prompted academics to once again contemplate the desirability of the Electoral College. This project's purpose was to compare the power of the Hispanic electorate under the current winner-take-all method of the Electoral College and three commonly proposed alternatives-proportional method, district method, and the direct-election system. By relying upon official results and exit polling of the 1992, 1996, 2000, 2004, and 2008 Presidential elections, I was able to assess how the different alternatives would have changed the outcome. A hypothetical shift of the Hispanic electorate was also performed to find the power of the electorate under these various systems. In addition, I considered how the different systems would change the candidates' campaigns. What was found was that the Hispanic electorate has the most power to shift election results under the current winner-take-all method, but this is strongly because of the high concentration of Hispanics in states with a high number of Electoral Votes. Therefore the proportional method seems to be the best method because the importance it gives to all Hispanics in all regions. It is also the most likely to be adopted as an alternative method of electing the president in the United States.

Ryan Garcia (2012, T): Marsh 101@10:30 AM

Title: Perceptions of Immigrants: A look at media coverage of the 2006 immigration protests
Major(s): World Languages: Spanish
Advisor(s): Rodriquez
Abstract: Although there has been constant conversation surrounding immigrants' rights and immigration legality in the United States, in 2006 the US Congress attempted to pass a bill which affected all immigrants, and prompted action by the immigrant population in the United States. What followed were country-wide protests and boycotts by the immigrant population. This project's purpose was to find the differences in the coverage of the immigration protests both between the Spanish and English news outlets as a whole and among the various news corporations, both English and Spanish. What was discovered was that the Spanish news agencies heavily favored the immigrant protests while the English sources were not nearly as favorable. Additionally, it was discovered that certain news agencies were overwhelmingly negative towards the protests, while others were much more sympathetic to the protesters.

Aaron Garner (2010, T): Marsh 206@11:30 AM

Title: US Arms Transfers to Pakistan: Necessary or Risky Business?
Major(s): Politics and Government
Advisor(s): Boykoff
Moore
Abstract: The United States wields a tremendous amount of power via the arms trade, as it remains the largest weapons exporter in the world today. This trade affords certain economic, military and foreign policy advantages that are not available to other countries. This thesis analyzes how arms transfers to Pakistan affect US national security and interests. US arms sales to Pakistan are problematic at best and show deficiencies in the arms trade and hypocrisies of US foreign policy.

Julie Garner (2011, T): Price 202@3:00 PM

Title: The Effects of Caffeine on Pulmonary Function at Rest
Major(s): Exercise Science
Advisor(s): Henry
Abstract: Caffeine has been shown to stimulate respiration in apneic infants and asthmatic patients; however, little research has assessed resting respiration and caffeine consumption in healthy individuals. PURPOSE: To assess the effects of caffeine on pulmonary function, specifically maximum voluntary ventilation (MVV), forced vital capacity (FVC), and forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1.0) during resting conditions. METHODS: Seventeen participants, 13 females (19-22 yr) and 4 males (20-26 yr) completed a double-blind, repeated measures study consisting of placebo and experimental (CAF ingestion, 6 mg•kg-1 body mass) conditions. The study examined MVV, FVC, and FEV1.0, using a metabolic cart. All participants were nonsmokers and free of pulmonary dysfunctions (e.g. asthma, illness). Testing schedule consisted of one familiarization session followed by two pulmonary function testing sessions. Participants were asked to abstain from caffeine for a minimum of 48 hours prior to testing. Testing sessions included baseline testing of MVV, FVC, and FEV1.0 followed by a randomized administration of treatment capsule. Post testing was performed 60 minutes after capsule administration. RESULTS: Repeated measures two-way ANOVA comparing pretest and posttest data for CONT and CAF conditions (α=0.05) found no pretest/posttest main effect, placebo/caffeine main effect or interaction for any of the pulmonary function variables - FVC, FEV1.0 and MVV. CONCLUSION: Caffeine had no effect on the resting pulmonary function of healthy individuals. Although some studies suggest caffeine has the action of bronchodilation, this effect may only be measureable and meaningful in pulmonary-compromised individuals such as asthmatics. This study does not address caffeine's effect on pulmonary functioning during exercise conditions.

Patricia Garner (2014, T): Marsh LL5@10:00 AM

Title: Amazing Grace
Major(s): Art
Advisor(s): Flory
Abstract: Through photography, I became the heroine in my own life story, and therefore chose to focus on beauty and new life in my art. My technique is listening to the still small voice of the Spirit that leads me to locations, directs me to pull over get out of my car, get ready and shoot. I am called a straight shot photographer, which I see as an extension of Fine Art Photography. With my camera in hand I dared to run in fields with elk herds, stand before eagles, and travel to new lands where I am in awe at the rise of the sun and the setting of the moon. Nature's power, amazing colors, and ever changing beauty influence my photographs. It is no surprise that outdoor wildlife, wetlands, and beaches have been the locations for my best inspirations as well as places of healing. I hope to offer the gift of hope and encouragement through my senior project AMAZING GRACE to any soul who needs to rise above the darkness of divorce, face fear, death, or loss. I've found that life is full of surprises, and I realized that, regardless of the heartache, we may choose the moments in which we live.

Jazzlynn Garrett (2014, T): Berglund 139@9:00 AM

Title: Traveling Womb
Major(s): English: Creative Writing
Advisor(s): Pagan
Abstract: This creative nonfiction thesis begins by telling the story of a young woman traveling for her first time outside the United States to York, England, for a study abroad program through Pacific University. The story weaves her experiences abroad with the sudden realization that she is pregnant. She faces difficult situations with tough decisions, such as whether or not she should abort the child or keep it, if she should tell her parents, who to go to for advice, and how to receive help with the National Healthcare System in England.

Amanda Garrick (2008, T): McGill Auditorium@10:30 AM

Title: Office of Student Conduct Website
Major(s): Media Arts
Advisor(s): Geraci


Abstract: Whether you have been formally introduced to the campus judicial system or not, you should know your rights as a Pacific student. Students on campus often do not know the process or the steps that they can take in the student judicial system. Because of this, I partnered with Student Life to create a multimedia-rich website for Pacific students. The site aims to answer questions about the judicial process and student rights. The site will include information about the Peer Review Board and the process that students would go through should they be brought before PRB; it will also contain terms and myths about the judicial process. My presentation will detail the process of making and launching the Office of Student Conduct website.

Andrea Garvey (2013, T): Marsh 201@2:00 PM

Title: Multi-Faceted Presentation of Self in Portland Police
Major(s): Sociology
Advisor(s): Whitehead
Abstract: By working on the street or in an office, driving around in a squad car, and living a life outside of police work, police officers find themselves in a variety of settings, interacting with a variety of people. This research focuses on the assortment of social encounters that police officers face daily and whether or not they require police officers to present and maintain many social identities. Using the work of Erving Goffman presented in his book The Presentation of Self in Everyday Life, this research looks at the police officer's "self", and how it is a central feature in the organization of every social encounter. Conclusions are based on 50 hours of observations of police work, and one interview with a sergeant with the Portland Police Bureau. Findings examine the division between "new" cop and "old" cop, the amount of separation an officer maintains between home life and police work, and police officer's routines on and off the job.

Tanica Gaspar (2013, T): Price 202@1:00 PM

Title: Effects and ecological implications of small population size on the endangered Hawaiian monk seal (Monachus schauinslandi)
Major(s): Biology
Advisor(s): Halpern
Abstract: The Hawaiian monk seal (Monachus schauinslandi) is the only marine mammal endemic to the Hawaiian Islands and one of the two extant species of monk seals. Currently their population size is estimated to be 1200 individuals and declining. This decline has prompted studies to evaluate the extent of ramifications due to small population size on the genetic diversity of these seals. Small population size can result in two effects: increases in genetic drift and inbreeding. Together, they can result in inbreeding depression, which is decreasing heterozygosity combined with reduction of fitness in individuals. Studies of the Hawaiian monk seal show a genome-wide loss of heterozygosity attributed to historically small population size. In particular, there is a lack of heterogeneity in the class I MHC gene, a gene essential to the immune response, which may leave the Hawaiian monk seal population at an increased risk for disease. This increased risk for disease is a particular issue for the monk seal subpopulation residing in the Main Hawaiian Islands (MHI) due to the likelihood of encounters with other mammals and human-related activities. It is also significant because the MHI Hawaiian monk seal subpopulation shows a trend of growth in size. Finally, conservation measures, such as translocation of individuals between islands, have been proposed to preserve the population and increase its numbers. The continuation of current conservation measures, specifically concentrated in the MHI, is important to aiding the prevention of extinction, but still does not address the problems of loss of genetic diversity and inbreeding that underlie small population size.

Billy Gates (2008, T): McGill Auditorium@4:00 PM

Title: The Media's Influence in Intercollegiate Athletics
Major(s): Media Arts
Advisor(s): Cassady


Abstract: The media’s presence in professional athletics has been apparent since the inception of sport as a career. Because of this, intercollegiate sports (mainly Division I) have been hiding in the shadows, until now. With the explosion of intercollegiate athletics coverage in the media, many questions have to be answered about the way they are covered. Where has amateurism gone, or was there any in the first place? Do the media influence athletes to the point where they do not finish education to “go pro”? Are college students treated like professional athletes by fans because of unnecessary media scrutiny? These questions, along with others, are examined and answered in the project through research and selected interviews.

Kristen Gazmen (2013, T): Berglund 139@3:30 PM

Title: Love Talk: Defining Love from Plato's Symposium to Raymond Carver's "What We Talk About When We Talk About Love"
Major(s): English: Literature
Advisor(s): Beard
Abstract: William Falkner wrote, "Perhaps they were right in putting love into books. Perhaps it could not live anywhere else." People have disagreed about the meaning of the word love for millennia, especially in literature. This thesis deals with the changing definitions of love from Plato to a more modern symposium that takes place in Carver's short story where love takes on a completely different, harsh, and cynical meaning. Analyzing these core works, together with ideas from Aphra Behn, William Shakespeare, Jane Austen, and Margaret Atwood, this thesis traces similarities across centuries and genres. It explores what these writers consider to be love, in hopes of finding what more literature can possibly say about the subject, or should we even try?

NiKole Gebhart (2013, T): Taylor Auditorium: Marsh 216@2:30 PM

Title: Old College Hall Online Museum
Major(s): Media Arts
Advisor(s): Geraci
Abstract: Pacific University is one of the oldest colleges in the Pacific Northwest and because of this, is full of interesting historical facts and stories. Located on the second floor of Old College Hall, the oldest building still standing on campus, is a museum full of artifacts relating to Pacific University and its history. I have developed an interactive website that displays the artifacts and stories that are part of this museum. The site was developed in order to reach a broader audience including alumni, current students, and faculty that are looking to learn a little more about Pacific's history. The site includes photos, descriptions, and audio clips to enhance the user experience. In my presentation, I will discuss how I designed and developed the site and demonstrate how it works.

Bayley Gelt (2009, T): Marsh 201@2:00 PM

Title: Help Wanted: HomePlate Youth Leadership Development Specialist
Major(s): Social Work
Advisor(s): Ritter
Abstract: Positive Youth Development (PYD) and other similar theories are based on the idea that providing youth with positive role models, activities and experiences leads to more successful outcomes, contrary to deficit-based models, which focus primarily on youth problems. A number of studies and experts have documented the effectiveness of this approach. HomePlate, a drop-in center for young people, ages 14-24 experiencing or at risk of homelessness or housing instability in Hillsboro, fosters the positive efforts of youth through community building, education, and youth empowerment. This is done through listening, helping young people process their situations, recognizing achievements, and providing guidance. In an ongoing effort to expand the services and guest base at HomePlate, this social work practicum student identified the need for a part-time Youth Leadership Development Specialist (YLDS) who would be responsible for a number of important youth development activities. This presentation will highlight the steps involved in helping HomePlate enhance their service delivery, which included applying for a Spirit Mountain Community Grant.

Sara George (2012, T): Marsh 101@1:00 PM

Title: Enfoque Ixcán: A Model For Eye Care Programs in Latin America
Major(s): World Languages: Spanish
Advisor(s): Christoph
Abstract: The purpose of this study is to provide a comprehensive overview of the optometric services available to the people of Guatemala. During the course of this study, it became apparent there are insufficient resources available to the Guatemalan population. This study focuses first on the history of Guatemala and its relation to the government's current quality of health care services, especially those of eye care. This study next examines the role of nongovernmental organizations (NGO's) that provide health care services in Guatemala. Lastly, it describes an NGO that was founded and directed by Pacific University's College of Optometry, Dr. Pike: Enfoque Ixcan. This study argues that Enfoque Ixcan should be considered a model for programs (both governmental and nongovernmental) providing eye care in Guatemala, and perhaps, in other developing nations of Latin America.

Karissa George (2014, T): Taylor Auditorium: Marsh 216@1:00 PM

Title: Technology still has bugs to workout
Major(s): Media Arts: Journalism
Advisor(s): Cassady
Abstract: This project will focus on the world of editing in the midst of ever-changing technology. It focuses on how newspapers began with mere words, ink and paper, then from there have constantly made small changes to increase the efficacy of producing a paper. Although these changes have made for a simpler production, problems have arisen within each technological advance in terms of editing. Furthermore, this paper surveys the opinions of today's local editors on how their publications have seen great change in a time where many are transitioning into fully electronic journalism. These editors discuss their responsibilities as an editor, how the digital age leaves greater room for error in editing, and whether or not it gives them reason to fear for the integrity of journalism's future. The paper includes examples of many notorious reporters who have made both a living and a bad reputation off of their mistakes that their editors were responsible for catching, but somehow did not. In conclusion, the project can be summed up into one sentence--although the digital age may provide a cleaner, faster approach to journalism; it is not at all flawless.

Travis George (2014, P): Strain Hall 3rd Floor@3:00 PM

Title: Estimating the 16S rRNA gene sequence length required for accurate profiling of microbial communities
Major(s): Bioinformatics
Advisor(s): Schnorr
Abstract: Identifying species is essential to understanding the biology of an ecosystem. The methods used to identify species today has changed drastically in recent years due to advances in technology that allow us to sequence genomes more efficiently and at a lower cost per nucleotide. Next generation sequencing methods generate shorter reads of 50-300 base pairs in length, and millions of reads in a single experiment. With advances in sequencing, more studies are being done to identify microbial communities in their natural environment because the sequencing methods allow for many species to be sequenced simultaneously from a single sample. Here I examine a study in which the microbial diversity on grapes and in vineyards was studied using millions of sequences with a read length of 250 base pairs (Bokulich et al., 2013). I propose to reanalyze the data and determine if the same results can be reached by varying the length of those reads and/or decreasing the number of sequences used. If shortening the read length and decreasing the number of reads used does not change the overall conclusions, microbial biogeography studies would be made more affordable to all.

Natalie Getchell (2011, P): Strain Hall 2nd Floor@2:00 PM

Title: Therapeutic Vaccination using Vesicular Stomatitis Virus Expressing Human Papillomavirus 16 E7 Protein in Humanized Mice Models with Pre-existing tumors
Major(s): Biology
Advisor(s): Schnorr
Abstract: The purpose of this proposed research is to test whether mice with pre-existing tumors experience an increased immune response after being vaccinated with the vesicular stomatitis vector vaccine expressing human papillomavirus 16 E7 protein. The proposed research differs from previous studies because it uses a "humanized" mouse model in place of a traditional mouse model in order for the results to be analyzed in a more realistic system. The mice will be injected with TC-1 tumor cells prior to being vaccinated with the VSV1-16E7 vaccine or an empty vector (control) vaccine. Blood from the mice will be drawn on a regular basis to determine the amount of CD8+ T-cells present. Additionally, the mice will be recorded for any palpable tumors present over the length of the study. At the end of the study the tumors will be excised from the mice and the volume of the tumors will be recorded. The predicted outcome of the proposed research is that the mice vaccinated with VSV1-16E7 will experience an increased immune response and have more CD8+ T-cells, fewer tumors overall, and a reduced tumor volume. Demonstrating the possible success of a therapeutic vaccine in a humanized mouse model gives support for further research in finding a therapeutic vaccine for women infected with human papillomavirus.

Todd Gienger (2007, T): Taylor Auditorium: Marsh 216@3:00 PM

Title: Hand Clasp Analysis: Individual Variation and Grooming Partners
Major(s): Psychology
Advisor(s): Bodamer


Abstract: Grooming among chimpanzees is universal and functions to strengthen social bonds among family, friends, and allies. McGrew and Tutin (1978) documented a unique pattern of grooming: the two-hand clasp. This behavior is often cited as evidence for a social custom in wild chimpanzees. Hand clasp is often provided as evidence for culture in chimpanzees (Whiten et al., 1999). Hand-clasp grooming has been seen at the Chimfunshi Wildlife Orphanage Trust in Zambia. Piloting has identified variations in hand clasp, similarly noted by Nakamura and Uehara (2004) at Mahale, Tanzania. This project will systematically record all instances of hand clasping. Analysis will determine whether style of hand clasp is consistent within individuals or changes as a function of grooming partners. Documentation of behavioral diversity in this unique group of chimpanzees will contribute to the debate on the existence of culture in our sibling species.

Simone Giess (2012, T): Price 203@10:30 AM

Title: The Effects of Maternal Nutrition on the Establishment of DNA Methylation Patterns of their Offspring and the Offspring's Resulting Risk for Obesity and Diabetes
Major(s): Biology
Advisor(s): Rynd
Abstract: Epigenetics is the study of changes in inheritance that occur without physically changing the DNA sequence. DNA methylation is an epigenetic mechanism that regulates gene expression by binding to promoters and silencing the gene before transcription occurs. Methylation patterns are important to establish correctly during gestational development in order to have normal gene regulation and healthy life as an adult. Methyl groups enter the body via foods containing methyl-donating groups such as vitamin B12, vitamin B6, vitamin B2, and folic acid. These methyl groups affect gene silencing and transcription based on the concentration in the body. Having a medium concentration of methyl groups in the maternal diet while pregnant will help establish healthy DNA methylation patterns in the child in early gestational development. Once healthy DNA methylation patterns are established, the offspring can maintain those patterns throughout their life with a healthy diet. This will help decrease their risk of health concerns such as cancer, obesity, insulin resistance, and diabetes.

Joshua Gietzen (2009, T): Price 214@2:30 PM

Title: Music and the Brain: The Impact of Musical Practice on Neurological Structure and Function
Major(s): Biology
Advisor(s): Rynd
Abstract: It is common knowledge that music has beneficial effects on intelligence and classroom performance; indeed many parents involve their children in music programs to improve their math and science scores. The corpus callosum (CC), the structure that connects the hemispheres of the brain and is responsible for allowing the brain to carry out high level reasoning, has been shown to be responsive to musical practice. According to a study done by Ozturk et al. (2002), the CC was greatly increased in size in professional musicians compared to those of non-musicians. Additionally, the white matter of the brain (highly myelinated areas of the brain), showed response to musical practice as well. Bengtsson et al. (2005) discovered that early application of musical practice (less than 11 years old) showed the greatest increase in myelination in a number of areas and in the density of those areas, as compared to age matched, non-musician cohorts. The further understanding of these phenomena will allow greater understanding of how the brain responds to musical practice.

Jennifer Gietzen (2011, T): Price 203@10:30 AM

Title: The effects of blue-light filters and vitamin E on the process of A2E-epoxide formation-and the implications for lipofuscin accumulation in age-related macular degeneration.
Major(s): Biology
Advisor(s): Rynd
Abstract: Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is an ocular disease that leads to vision loss and legal blindness in elderly people. Previous research has indicated that the process of lipofuscin accumulation occurs after the death of photoreceptor cell outer segments, and leads to the deterioration of retinal pigmented epithelium cells (RPE). As a result, RPE, and the photosensitive molecules that accumulate as lipofuscin within RPE, are of major interest. One of these molecules is a pryidinium bisretinoid compound known as A2E. A2E, when irradiated with blue spectrum light (430 nm), can self-generate a singlet oxygen and undergo a process called photooxidation. This process leads to the formation of epoxides in the carbon-carbon double bonds in A2E. These epoxides can lead to damaging effects in the vision cycle that may lead to blindness. This study will use antioxidants and a blue-light filter to study the effects of these treatments on epoxide formation in A2E. The implications on lipofuscin accumulation in age related macular degeneration will be discussed.

Eric Gietzen (2013, T): Marsh 201@11:30 AM

Title: "Do Cultural Disparities exist on the Football Team at Pacific University?"
Major(s): Sociology
Advisor(s): Whitehead
Abstract: This study explores the group dynamics formed and demonstrated between Pacific University football players from Hawaii and those from the continental United States. Qualitative information was sought through two focus groups. Some of the major themes that were found are tied to concepts coined by a theorist named Pierre Bourdieu. Bourdieu's concepts are the primary driving force behind the maintenance of the small amount of division found within the Pacific University football team. The perception created by mainland white privilege as well as the perception created by Hawaii local culture seem to strengthen the division on the football team. The findings led me to conclude that the feelings exhibited between the two different groups were not completely the same. Positive feelings from both the mainland and Hawaii focus groups were exhibited through a number of more specific reasons such as the ability to meet people from different areas through the institution of football, to learn about a new culture, and to create life long friendships. These were found to break down the division on the football team and help the players coexist in harmony. However, the negative feelings of the Hawaii focus group were exhibited through a more specific reason, such as local culture imitation by mainlanders. This in turn strengthened the division found within the football team. This study is important because it can help alleviate broader tensions on campus.

Aaron Gifford (2013, T): Marsh 106@2:30 PM

Title: The Secret Too Soon: An Examination of Syd Barrett's Muse
Major(s): Psychology
Advisor(s): Schultz
Abstract: The goal of this psychobiography is to better understand Syd Barrett as a person and as a musician. Syd is best known for being one of the founding members of the Pink Floyd, a band he was eventually kicked out of due to his odd, deteriorating behavior, including singing with his back to the audience. In this thesis my focus is on Syd's solo work, specifically the question of what motivated Syd to include so many references to a female muse in his lyrics. Syd's life history is examined, as well as several song lyrics referencing this muse. Using Tomkins's script theory, a prototypal script is extracted from these songs. To explain Syd's motivations behind the use of this script, salient biographical details are examined as a means of arriving at psychological interpretations.

Daisy Gildner (2013, T): Berglund 139@1:30 PM

Title: The Evolution of a Fairy Tale: "Little Red Riding Hood" in Contemporary Culture
Major(s): English: Creative Writing
Advisor(s): Postma
Abstract: My creative writing thesis includes the first two chapters of my novel-a creative re-imagining of "Little Red Riding Hood"-as well as an analysis of different versions of the tale. Titled Seeing Red, my novel is set in the modern world but with a magical twist. The premise of my narrative is that characters in contemporary fairy tales possess the abilities of their fairy tale ancestors. By recreating these tales in my novel, I can explore the nature of character roles and traditional storytelling. In the critical portion of my thesis, I trace the evolution of "Little Red Riding Hood" from the Charles Perrault edition published in 1697, through the Jacob and Wilhelm Grimm's story of 1812, to an oral version of the fairy tale recorded at the end of the nineteenth century. I discuss the changes in the tale and how it has been adapted for use in current films, novels, and even advertisements.

Katherine Gillem (2013, T): Berglund 232@11:00 AM

Title: Community Building in the Early Learning Community How Teachers, Parents and Students Collaborate to Foster Cooperation and Learning
Major(s): FG. Education and Learning
Advisor(s): Phillips
Abstract: The intent of our capstone project was to research the specific ways community building is encouraged in two Early Learning Community classrooms at Pacific University. Data were collected over a six week period. We collected: observational field notes; pictures documenting community building; interviews from teachers; and information from a parent survey. Data were analyzed through categorizing observations into main areas of community building based upon a review of literature and analysis of the data, including: the importance of routines and ritual; parent involvement; and mutual respect. To analyze the data, we compared data across main areas and made connection to answer the question, "How is community fostered in early childhood education?" Through this process, we learned the most important aspects of community building, and how teachers and children in the Early Learning Community are creating a collaborative learning environment.

Kelcy Gillen (2013, T): Price 202@2:30 PM

Title: A Meta-Analytic Examination of the Effects of Behavior Analysis Interventions on Increasing Appropriate Social Behaviors in Physical Activity Settings
Major(s): Exercise Science
Advisor(s): Alstot
Abstract: Applied behavior analysis (ABA) is a branch of psychology concerned with developing technologies to help improve behaviors (Cooper, Heron, & Heward, 2005). ABA has been used in education settings to improve academic performance (Mulcahy & Krezmien, 2009) and behavior (Austin & Soeda, 2008). In 1972, Siedentop and Rushall first theorized that ABA could also be applied in sport and physical education settings to improve motor skill and social behaviors. Since Siedentop and Rushall's (1972) expansion of ABA into sport and physical education, there have been numerous individual examples of empirical research supporting the effectiveness of ABA in improving social behavior in physical activity settings. Despite these numerous individual examples, the overall effect of ABA-based interventions on social behaviors in physical activity settings is unknown. Purpose: The primary purpose of this study was to use meta-analysis techniques to examine the overall effect of using ABA techniques in physical activity settings to increase appropriate social behaviors. The secondary purpose of this study was to understand how moderating variables (age, gender, developmental level, setting, management strategy, and social skill) influenced the overall effect on improving social skills using ABA techniques. Methods: Five different databases were searched to find articles and dissertations for this meta-analysis. In order to be included in this study, articles had to meet three criteria: (1) they had to utilize single subject designs, (2) they had to include interventions based in ABA, and (3) they had to include a dependent variable that measured a positive social skill. Once articles were identified for inclusion, moderator variable data were extracted and coded and data from each study's baseline and intervention phases were extracted and used to calculate effect sizes (ES). Data Analysis: The standardized mean difference formula (SMD) was used to calculate each ESSMD (Olive & Smith, 2005). Using a random effects model, the overall weighted mean ES calculations and moderator analyses were conducted using Comprehensive Meta-Analysis software. Results & Conclusions: The ESSMD was 1.813 (95% CI = 1.593, 2.033), which suggests that ABA interventions have a very strong, positive influence on increasing positive social behaviors in physical activity settings. Development level and management strategy were the only moderator variables that influenced the overall effect. These findings suggest that techniques based in ABA can be very effective for practitioners desiring to increase appropriate social behavior in physical activity settings.

Samantha Gillenwater (2011, P): Strain Hall 3rd Floor@3:00 PM

Title: The effect of sleep deprivation on foraging behavior and lifespan of wild type and Shmns mutant adult Drosophila melanogaster
Major(s): Biology
Advisor(s): Lopez
Abstract: The realization that humans are not capable of normal function without sleep has led to an interest in researching sleep habits in many animals. Studies have turned to Drosophila melanogaster, the common fruit fly, because these insects are small, have a short lifespan, produce a lot of progeny and most importantly have a sleep state. The objective of this proposal is to determine the effects of sleep deprivation on the foraging behaviors and lifespan of adult D. melanogaster wild type, Shmns mutants and wild type individuals that have been mechanically sleep deprived. I also propose to examine sexual dimorphism in these effects for each of the three types of D. melanogaster. D. melanogaster will be housed individually in vials that will be kept under identical conditions including food and light and dark cycles. Altering the fruit flies' light and dark cycles with artificial light will induce mechanical sleep deprivation. The fruit flies will be monitored by observation and video recording looking for the amount of time the fruit flies forage as well as how long they survive post eclosure. I predict that in wild type adult D. melanogaster sleep deprivation will reduce the amount of time spent foraging and shorten lifespan because of the extra stress due to lack of sleep. I predict that sleep deprivation will not affect the Shmns mutants as much as the wild type adult D. melanogaster because of adaptations that have developed in association with the mutation. This research is very important to research in the field for sleep in human, as D. melanogaster is a prime model for mammalian sleep habits.

Elias Gilman (2009, T): Marsh 106@1:30 PM

Title: Hic Sunt Glacierum: Canadian Arctic Sovereignty and the Role of American Challenges
Major(s): History
Advisor(s): Szefel
Abstract: The question of who owns the Arctic has a rich and varied history that stretches back centuries. Originally a concern due to the possibility that the region contained the fabled Northwest Passage, the Arctic saw reinvention as an issue repeatedly in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Canada’s claims to sovereignty in the Arctic have come under fire at various times since the British transferred to Arctic to Canada in 1880. Key to the dynamics that have shaped how Canada has asserted its sovereignty have been American challenges. Although it harbors no designs of its own upon most of the region, the United States has long had vested interests in seeing Canada implement decisive policies concerning its Arctic sovereignty, and to this end has orchestrated an array of challenges to Canadian control in the region. This thesis examines some of these challenges, discerning how American provocations have shaped and molded Canadian Arctic policy, and even played a role in the Arctic becoming an integral component of Canadian identity. This is a significant departure from how other historians have treated Arctic sovereignty in the past, for they have mainly focused on issues such as environmental concerns, national security, and indigenous groups’ rights, rather than acknowledging the overriding importance of the American-Canadian relationship (and rivalry).

Nathan Gilpin (2011, T): Price 202@2:00 PM

Title: The Consequence of Speech Production on Lactate Threshold during Submaximal Exercise
Major(s): Exercise Science
Advisor(s): Henry
Abstract: Competition is spurred in the human respiratory system when both the physiological necessity to breathe and the behavioral desire to produce speech occur simultaneously. This competition is exaggerated when the physiological demand for oxygen consumption (VO2) is increased during high respiratory drive or during exercise. Previous research has found that speech production during steady-state submaximal exercise is responsible for decreased minute ventilation, breathing frequency, and oxygen consumption, as well as increased [blood lactate]. However, the previous research does not reveal much information on the impact of speech production on lactate accumulation kinetics. Methods: In counterbalanced fashion, participants in this study completed two graded exercise tests within the physiological window of 40-70% of their estimated VO2 max, one testing session required participants to read printed passages aloud while the other session required participants to remain silent. Cardiopulmonary data and [blood lactate] were monitored throughout both testing sessions. Data from this study will provide insight into the physiological effects of talking while engaged in aerobic activity. Results & Conclusion: To be presented.

Paula Gilster (2008, T): Berglund 200@11:00 AM

Title: Sleeping Beauty Snores: the Anti-Fairy Tale within Jane Austen?s Fairy Tale Novel
Major(s): English: Literature
Advisor(s): Thompson


Abstract: From adolescence to adulthood, readers are entranced by fairytales. Austen continues this fascination by designing her novels as what would seem to be fairytales for older readers. While Austen’s novels model Cinderella in many ways, the happily-ever-after is not as easy for her heroines as it is in fairytales, and her Princes are not all that dashing when compared to the medieval models. Just as fairytales help children deal with real world challenges, Austen also teaches her readers about finding the happy ending in the absurdities of adulthood, when the fairytale does not go according to plan, Sleeping Beauty snores, and Cinderella’s foot is just too fat to fit any glass slipper.

Thomas Gilstrap (2013, T): Taylor Auditorium: Marsh 216@2:00 PM

Title: Cooking with PAC Thai
Major(s): Media Arts
Advisor(s): Geraci
Abstract: For my senior capstone, I designed, took photographs, and wrote a cookbook for Forest Grove's PAC Thai restaurant; and I created a supplementary web site for the book. My cookbook features a modern design in the layout of recipes and high quality, full-page photographs showcasing the finished dishes. PAC Thai has an online presence, and now they will be able to support that promotional vehicle with a cookbook filled with some of the restaurant's most popular dishes. The site features information regarding the cookbook, an active blog where new recipes will be posted, as well as information on how to purchase a physical and digital copy of the cookbook. In my presentation, I will discuss the processes I used in planning, designing and photographing the cookbook, as well as the development of the website.

Karsten Gimre (2008, T): Strain 121@9:30 AM

Title: A Numerical Analysis of Nonlinear Partial Differential Equations Related to Electrochemistry
Major(s): Mathematics
Advisor(s): Guenther


Abstract: In this project, we set up a system of nonlinear partial differential equations to model an electrochemical reaction. Our results answer a long-standing conjecture as to whether current is influenced by a certain reaction parameter. After manipulating the domain of the functions involved, we could solve them numerically with MATLAB. With Laplace Transforms, we were able to convert the system of equations into a single equation. We determined that an analytical solution to the equation seems unknown, and likely not possible. Using existence and uniqueness theorems, together with the Lax Equivalence Theorem, we showed that the numerical solution is indeed the correct solution.

Kerensa Gimre (2009, T): Price 204@8:30 AM

Title: Answering a Burning Question: Analyzing Methods to Estimate Remaining Oil Reserves and Peak Oil Production
Major(s): Mathematics
Advisor(s): Guenther
Abstract: Peak oil (the time when half of all oil exploitable oil is expended) was introduced in the 1950s by M. King Hubbert who wished to predict the time of maximum oil production for both the United States and the world. Correctly following Hubbert's prediction, US oil production peaked in the 1970s. There currently exist a variety of estimates for the timing of world peak oil production. Due to the vast economic implications of running out of fuel, peak oil is a critical problem. We investigate methods to estimate remaining amounts of untapped oil supply, specifically the Level Set Method. Developed in the 1980s, the Level Set Method has numerous applications in fluid mechanics, materials science, computer vision, computational geometry, computer-aided design, and image processing. By numerically solving the Hamilton-Jacobi equation and applying an appropriate velocity function dependent on the curvature (curvature in this instance depends on image intensity), an image can be analyzed to eliminate noise. This process assists in "cleaning up" a seismic image of the earth's subsurface. If these images are cleaner, more accurate approximations for subterranean oil can be found. This information is vital to oil companies when deciding if it cost-effective to drill a field, and is also important when predicting total remaining subterranean oil.We conclude by estimating the timing of peak oil using the results of the Level Set Method and analyzing the popular Hubbert's Method

Kerensa Gimre (2009, T): Price 203@4:30 PM

Title: Experimental Measurements of Loss and Coupling Efficiency in Holey Fibers
Major(s): Physics
Advisor(s): Butler
Abstract: Holey fibers have recently been developed as a useful tool in fiber optic systems due to the ease in accurately engineering desired optical properties. Different from regular fibers that are characterized by a central core material with a relatively high refractive index surrounded by a second material with a lower refractive index, holey fibers have a solid core surrounded by a hexagonal array of holes. While light is primarily coupled into the core of a holey fiber, a small portion of the light extends into the surrounding holes. The optical properties of the holey fibers can be tailored by filling the holes with various solvents with known refractive indices. As the refractive index of the solvent approaches that of the glass core, the percentage of the light that extends into the holes changes, which alters the energy loss as the light propagates. By measuring the transmission for two lengths of fiber, the coupling efficiency and loss as a function of index of refraction of the holes are found. There exists extensive theoretical work calculating these values and we seek to validate it with our experimental results.

Karsten Gimre (2009, T): Price 203@3:30 PM

Title: Distinguishing Quantum and Classical Correlations
Major(s): Physics
Advisor(s): Duncan
Abstract: Experimental results for quantum systems show correlations between events that cannot be explained by our common sense, “classical” picture of reality. Recent results demonstrating the usefulness of quantum correlations have led to an explosion of interest in the study of quantum information and the related fields of quantum computing and cryptography. The nature of the difference between quantum and classical correlations is difficult to see clearly, which is why it took many decades after quantum theory was developed, to see this usefulness and develop the field of quantum information. In this project, we have designed a computer program that allows users to play a betting game which highlights essential differences between classical mechanics and quantum mechanics. In particular, the game illustrates the specific practical advantage (winning money in this case) provided by quantum correlations. As the result of a computer simulation over 500 trials, we found that on average the quantum physicists earned over ten million times as much as the classical physicists.

Leda Glastonbury (2012, T): McGill Auditorium@2:30 PM

Title: Nurturing our Community
Major(s): Environmental Studies w/ Sustainable Design Emphasis
Advisor(s): O'Day
Abstract: In a hungry world, it can be daunting and exciting to focus on a project for change. Many of us are aware that millions of people go hungry every day and of those who eat, the food is often sparse and lacking essential nutrients. We are also familiar with wasteful systems of food production, preparation, distribution, and consumption. My concern about these problems and my love of the fruit that grows in the Willamette Valley inspired me to assess the potential for addressing food security we have here in the community of Forest Grove. When I looked closer, I realized that, while being a place of agricultural business, there is a lot that is not being harvested. My project focuses on how community harvest, partnership, outreach, and redistribution on a local scale can gracefully solve the two problems of malnutrition of low- income individuals and good healthy fruit falling to the ground. In preparation for my project, I researched models from across the US that address food justice and opportunity. In a small pilot project, I worked with local organizations, homeowners, students, and community members to conduct two fruit harvests this last October in which we divided hundreds of pounds of good fruit amongst the above groups. From this project, I gained an insight into community organizational, future planning skills and much more. I have worked to create connections between community partners so that further projects of this kind will have a running start.

Adam Glover (2014, T): Price 202@8:00 AM

Title: Looking Back On Why We Look Forward: Reviewing Selection Pressures That Favored Forward Facing Eyes In Ancestral Primates
Major(s): Biology
Advisor(s): Alkaslassy
Abstract: Primates differ from other mammals in that they specialized in vision as their primary sense. This specialization is expressed in part by their characteristic anteriorly directed eye orbits. What selection pressures favored anteriorly directed eye orbits in ancestral primates? The hypotheses are many. Most propose that a unique diet or mode of locomotion favored such an orientation. These include the Arboreal theory, the Visual Predation hypothesis, and the Angiosperm/Omnivore hypotheses. Another, however, proposes that such an orientation improved the ancestral primate's ability to detect predatory snakes. This novel and promising hypothesis has become known as the Snake Detection hypothesis. There is no general agreement as to whether one selective pressure can be identified as the primary selective pressure for this trait.

Ted Gold (2012, T): Warner 28@9:30 AM

Title: Constructing Heathen Valley
Major(s): Theatre
Advisor(s): Sanders
Abstract: In the world of Theatre, collaboration is one of the most important elements to a cohesive production; the lighting must work with the set, as well as illuminate the actors, and all the while, not overpower the costumes. As the set designer for Pacific's main-stage production of Heathen Valley by Romulus Linney, I wanted to not only convey a setting that worked for the show and allowed me to depict my own artistic vision, but I also needed to collaborate with the entire design team, including Sam Stein (Director), who was also working on the production for her senior project, to ensure that a unified vision was presented to our audience. The process allowed me to utilize all of the skills I have learned during my time at Pacific. I have worked in the scene shop for all four years, and that paired with my growing knowledge of Theatre gave me all of the necessary skills I needed to create a successful set.

Mallory Goldammer (2010, T): Marsh 206@8:30 AM

Title: "There's One In Every Conflict": Elementary Children Demonstrate the Use Of I-Messages As Conflict Resolution
Major(s): Education
Advisor(s): Phillips
Abstract: This senior project explores the use of I-messages with grades one, two, and three students to resolve conflicts. The classroom teacher noticed that children lacked strategies to resolve conflicts. The student teacher/researcher taught a series of eight lessons to children on conflict resolution using I-messages. The data was triangulated by collecting artifacts, observations, and interviews; data collected included children’s work, audio-recordings and transcripts of each session, observation of children at play and in class, and field notes. On-going data analysis was completed through analytic memos. Data was coded and categorized. Four case studies were selected as illustrations of how children learn to use I-messages. The research demonstrates that children can learn and use I-messages effectively.

Caitlin Gollehon (2009, T): Price 202@1:00 PM

Title: How does Acclimation to Load Carrying Affect Walking Mechanics and Economy?
Major(s): Exercise Science
Advisor(s): Schot
Abstract: One of the big questions in human movement science is how to move economically. For locomotion it has generally been assumed that we are self-optimizing. There is clear evidence that there is a strong mechanical basis (modeling the leg as a pendulum to match resonant and stride frequencies) for locomotor optimization, but tests under everyday or lab conditions do not seem to elicit such behavior. Purpose: To extend previous work that used acute load carrying (40 pound rucksack) to create a stronger need for optimization by adding an acclimation phase. Methods: After granting consent, participants were measured, fit with a heart rate monitor, and familiarized to the treadmill and experimental setup. All walked under four different conditions: preferred stride frequency loaded, preferred stride frequency unloaded, ideal stride frequency unloaded and ideal stride frequency loaded at 2 sessions separated by one week. No stride length regulations were applied, so velocity was always self selected. During the week between sessions, only the experimental group walked (unregulated) for 1 mile carrying a 30 pound backpack on each of 5 consecutive days. A 4-way ANOVA was used to examine the effects of load, group, session, and frequency. Results: The primary variable, economy, was expressed as meters traveled per heart beat and demonstrated a quadruple interaction attributable to the group by frequency interaction (F1,18 = 5.25, p = .034). There were no significant session effects (F1,18 = 1.30, p = .270). Load carriage decreased economy (F1,18 = 41.38, p<.001) approximately 8%. To attempt to understand the economy interaction, heart rate and velocity responses were analyzed further. Both heart rate (F1,18 = 6.07, p = .024) and velocity (F1,18 = 5.43, p = .032) presented triple interactions involving time, load and frequency that did not offer a clear explanation for the group x frequency interactive response. Conclusion: Acclimation did not elicit a more optimized behavior. Randomization flaws and/or a training effect may have occurred to obscure these results.

Micah Gomes (2012, T): CLIC@11:30 AM

Title: Tattooing the Past for Hawaii's Future
Major(s): Anthropology
Advisor(s): Mahar
Abstract: At one point in time Hawaiian tattoos were once a prominent aspect of the Hawaiian culture. Their motifs held a strong connection for the individual as well as the society that they lived in. But after the arrival of Europeans to the Hawaiian Islands, Hawaiian tattoos quickly lost their place in a culture that was changing and adapting to the arrival of foreigners. For about 200 years Hawaiian tattoos were scarce enough to be views as a lost art, but in the 1970s a few individuals brought about a resurgence and renewed interest in many aspects of the Hawaiian culture, including Hawaiian tattoos. Today, tattoos have made big strides in becoming a prominent aspect of our culture once again, but many individuals claim to have Hawaiian tattoos when really what they have are neo-Polynesian tattoos. This misconception will be cleared up in my thesis. My thesis will assess, compare, and evaluate ancient Hawaiian tattoos of the past to contemporary tattoos of modern times. Using Victor Turner's theories of Liminality and Communitas I arrive at some interesting conclusions on the present and future of Hawaiian tattoos.

Micah Gomes (2012, T): Price 203@4:00 PM

Title: The Fairytales that Never Happened
Major(s): Art
Advisor(s): Cheyne
Abstract: On the surface, fairytales, myths, and legends provide us with an array of stories of fictional individuals who struggle in some fashion so that the reader may learn from their mistakes. Fairytales encompass truths of reality and blend them with fictional fantasies. Delving deeper into these stories they represent a piece of culture; the setting, the characters, and even the morals are all relative to the culture the story is from. Coming from the Hawaiian Islands I've seen that communication between cultures can sometimes be misinterpreted or wrongly justified. Using digital art and drawings, my project is meant to exploit these differences in culture in the stories each culture tells. In this way, it is my goal to make my audience aware of these cultural differences and also to present the fact that there is more than one way to look at an artwork. I will be using fairytales, myths, and legends from different cultures as my basis for each artwork I create in hopes that my audience can relate to what is being depicted, but also to urge those same members of the audience to challenge themselves to finding other meanings and to change their perspective to look at the artwork in a new light.

Malia Gonsalves (2010, T): Berglund 200@1:30 PM

Title: Build and Destroy:  Sex, Violence & Music in The Temple of the Golden Pavilion and A Clockwork Orange
Major(s): English: Literature
Advisor(s): Beard
Abstract: Based on the actual burning of Kinkakuji in Kyoto by a Buddhist acolyte, Mishima’s novel The Temple of the Golden Pavilion breaks down the potential motivations behind the destruction of one of Japan’s most famous temples.  In doing so, Mishima creates a protagonist obsessed with beauty, especially the loveliness of music, and the overwhelming need to destroy everything beautiful in order to define his sexual identity.  The protagonist of Burgess’ A Clockwork Orange also experiences the overlap and layer of violence, sex, and beautiful music.  Both novels follow the boys through adolescence into adulthood as they navigate the relationship of these three elements and the way the existence of one incites the other, and how they express their obsessions by attacking others in search of a release—either sexual or emotional.  Mishima and Burgess are writing in post World War II nations, East and West; both struggle with rites of passage for the transition from boyhood to manhood. The complex interaction of sex, violence and music marks this difficult passage from the first taking of life, the loss of innocence, to a search for the self. 

Anabel Gonzalez-Camacho (2014, T): Berglund 216@2:00 PM

Title: Engagement with Interactive Media: Evaluating Pocoyo as an asset to Preschool English Language Learners
Major(s): Education
Advisor(s): Zijdemans Boudreau
Abstract: Over the years, teachers, parents, and the government have attempted to find ways to help English Language Learners (ELL) develop English proficiently. The Pocoyo program, a collaboration between the Early Learning Collaboration and HITV, was designed to assist Spanish-speaking preschool aged students in their acquisition of the English language by incorporating interactive media (Ipad applications), manipulatives, and more based on the TV show Pocoyo. Our research team studied the effectiveness of this program to engage students; our premise being that students learn through engagement. The setting for the study was a public bilingual preschool housed in an elementary school in the state of Oregon. The collaborating teacher designed a transportation unit, based on the Pocoyo program, titled Things That Go and taught it over a three week period to her 16 students, all from migrant families with Spanish as their native language. We developed an engagement rubric to score and record student responses to the Pocoyo materials as we collected the following various data: 1. A first and last trial with the Ipad app; 2. Video recordings of students working with the media; 3. Personal observations of each student's behaviors while using the materials. We also conducted an entry and exit teacher interview, videotaped the teacher's interactions with the students, and collected her final unit assessments. Our goal was to answer the question: How does Pocoyo use its interactive assets to engage Spanish-speaking preschool age students in their acquisition of English? From our interactions with each of the students, we sought to determine whether or not these tools are in fact engaging for these English Language Learners. Our findings suggest that Pocoyo is something that a teacher may use as a component to a lesson or unit, but that on its own it would not be sufficient to teach students the English language. Furthermore, while using Pocoyo preschool students still require a great deal of scaffolding, assistance, and interaction in order to create long-term memories of the target vocabulary words.

Maria Gonzalez-Cress (2014, T): Marsh 206@9:30 AM

Title: Temporary Food Vendors and Compliance with Food Safety Guidelines in Washington County, Oregon
Major(s): Public Health
Advisor(s): Peterson-Besse
Abstract: It is estimated that each year in the United States, 1 in 6 or 48 million people become ill, 128,000 are hospitalized, and 3,000 die from foods that are contaminated with food borne illness. With information from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and its Foodborne Outbreak Online Database, it is known that five outbreaks have occurred at a "fair, festival, or other temporary or mobile service" in Oregon between 1998 and 2011. This project will develop a thorough education program for temporary food vendors who sell foods at area farmers markets. To reach as many vendors as possible in Washington County's ethnically diverse population, it is necessary that the program be culturally competent and that all education material will be translated into Spanish. This program will address the most common food code violations and safe food handling of Potentially Hazardous Foods, specifically the Danger Zone, or the range of temperatures from 41?F (5?C) to 135?F (57?C), in which bacteria causing food borne illness is most likely to grow. This project aims to increase knowledge and practice of food safety guidelines for temporary food vendors who sell foods at Washington County farmers market locations and decrease opportunities for food borne illnesses to spread. Development and evaluation of this intervention will be discussed

Kathie Goodpaster (2014, T): Berglund 216@3:30 PM

Title: Mathematics and Grit: Teaching Strategies for Elementary School
Major(s): Education
Advisor(s): Phillips
Abstract: The intent of our project was to notice and name various teaching strategies to promote grit in the third, fourth, fifth, and sixth grade math classrooms at the request of the Forest Grove Community School. We also looked at how attitudes towards math played out through the students' mindsets. For our project, we: 1) read and reviewed literature related to grit, teaching strategies, and mindsets; 2) observed in third, fourth, fifth, and sixth grade math classrooms to better understand students' current mindsets towards grit in math; and 3) worked with the Forest Grove Community School teachers to develop teaching strategies which would promote grit in their math classrooms. Data collected through our observations were synthesized and analyzed. By scaffolding perseverance-based math strategies, teachers are able to positively impact students' motivation. Finally, the practical applications of our research will be provided to the teachers at the Forest Grove Community School in a formal presentation as well as in a portfolio of collective teaching strategies to promote grit.

Marrissa Gottlob (2008, T): Marsh 201@3:30 PM

Title: Improving Quality of Life: Implementing Palliative Care in a Hospital Setting
Major(s): Social Work
Advisor(s): Doerfler


Abstract: The literature indicates an overwhelming transition of Americans who are now dying in acute or long-term care institutions compared to the historical site of the home. In fact, more Americans die in hospitals than any other location. This trend is compounded by the growing population of elderly who often comprise the majority of end-of-life patients. As a result, there is an increased demand for quality care for those living with severe pain and debilitating symptoms that are no longer responsive to curative treatment. Palliative care addresses pain and symptom management by avoiding or decreasing physical suffering of the person, as well as addressing psychological and spiritual challenges that deteriorate the overall well-being of the individual. Palliative care can be administered in isolation or in addition to curative treatment at various care facilities, such as nursing homes or rehabilitation centers. To optimize the quality of life of patients receiving treatment in an institutionalized setting, more hospitals are enhancing the primary function of curative medicine by employing customary palliative medicine. This capstone project focused on the development of a plan to implement a multidisciplinary palliative care team into Tuality Community Hospital.

Celeste Goulding (2010, T): Berglund 232@10:00 AM

Title: It Takes a Village to Raise a Prostitute: Resources and Needs of Prostitution Rehabilitation Services in Portland Oregon
Major(s): Social Work
Advisor(s): Schweitzer
Abstract: Portland is a hub for the sex industry in the Northwest United States. With the exception of certain counties in Nevada, it is home to the most de-regularized sex industry in the country. As a result, Prostitution thrives. Stigmatized by society and law enforcement alike, the mental and physical harms associated with prostitution causes this demographic to need specialized programs and services in order to fully recover. These needs include intensive counseling and stable, supportive housing. There are various non-profit agencies, as well as vice squads and detectives, working on prostitution rehabilitation in Portland. This project assesses non-profit and government agencies to determine what resources are available to prostitutes in Portland. Gaps in resources are identified and the needs of this vulnerable group are highlighted.

James Gourley (2010, T): Marsh 206@11:00 AM

Title: Union Suppression: A Comparative Analysis of the patco Strike and the Ravenswood Lockout
Major(s): Politics and Government
Advisor(s): Boykoff
Seward
Abstract: This thesis is a comparative study that analyzes two historical episodes involving labor union suppression during labor disputes. Comparing the modes of suppression used by governments and corporations, I analyze the patco strike, which is an example of government suppression, and the Ravenswood lockout, which is an example of private, corporate suppression. These case studies vary in many ways: the origin of suppressing force, the suppressive actions taken, and resulting outcome of the labor dispute. The analysis finds that government suppressive agents were more effective at suppressing the patco strike than the Ravenswood Corporation was at suppressing the lockout. This result shows how the distinct modes of suppression and the union’s reaction to such suppression directly led to the defeat or victory of the labor dispute.

Cathlene Goya (2012, T): Berglund 232@10:30 AM

Title: Nonviolent Communication in the Elementary School
Major(s): Education
Advisor(s): Phillips
Abstract: This senior project describes the introduction of Rosenberg's (2003) four components of Nonviolent Communication (NVC) to the grade 3-6 students of Forest Grove Community School (FGCS). NVC is a four-step process of conflict resolution that includes 1) observation without evaluation, 2) identifying and expressing feelings, 3) discovering our needs, and 4) making requests Teacher-researchers delivered lessons to students once a week over a series of five weeks, targeting each NVC component. Teacher-researchers collected data during each session, including observations of lessons and in other school settings, worksheets, surveys, pictures, video and audio recordings, and pre/post assessments of student learning. Data were collected and analyzed over a five-week period. Themes found while transcribing and analyzing data include a) the student's definition and identification of conflict compared to the teacher-researcher's views, b) disconnection of knowledge about NVC and its application, c) the importance of an underlying culture of trust in effective NVC. These themes were presented to the FGCS principal and teachers, to help them determine their next plan of action toward developing a system for conflict resolution.

Erin Goya (2012, T): Library Conference@11:30 AM

Title: The Theory of Distributive Justice and Its Role in the Allocation of Funds within Intercollegiate Sports
Major(s): Philosophy
Advisor(s): Joseph
Abstract: In this thesis I will argue that with the support of two theories of distributive justice, the desert-based principle and libertarian principle, the unequal allocation of funds within intercollegiate sports can be considered fair and just. The desert-based principle distributes resources based on whether or not people deserve them (Lamont). For example, athletic talent and experience can be considered as abilities deserving variance in athletic scholarship rewards. The libertarian principle enforces the notion that people are entitled to a certain amount of the goods so long as there is enough left for others to obtain (Boaz); for example, some coaches can justly earn significantly larger paychecks than others so long as there is a significant remainder of funds to distribute to less experienced, less-followed sports coaches who are nonetheless deserving of being compensated for their work. A major part of my argument will center on theories of equality since it sets the foundation to entertain a discussion of the concept of justice, and has traditionally done so in the broader ethics literature.

Marisa Graham-Collier (2012, T): Price 1st Floor Hallway@1:00 PM

Title: Applying Permaculture Principles to Organization Development and Business Structures
Major(s): Environmental Studies w/ Sustainable Design Emphasis
Advisor(s): O'Day
Abstract: For every business to thrive it is important for clear and effective organization of infrastructure to be made available to all employees and board members. This is often overlooked or under appreciated by new grassroots organizations as they first start, therefore, as they progress, it is important to evaluate the goals and operations of the business and make improvements where necessary. The principles of systems thinking, as a way to develop business infrastructure, is captured by the Permaculture design framework within the system domains of community governance, finance, economics, education, and culture. In the case of the Pacific University B Street Permaculture Project, it has become clear that there is a strong need for an operations handbook that makes information available to students, staff, and faculty necessary for daily operations. This includes a clear outline of job titles and duties, clear and organized information about organic certification and re-certification needs, and an outline for future development of a functional Board of Trustees. There is also a need for a more extensive policy and procedures guideline that addresses current and future needs relating to operations, site use, and grant based funding. This project explores the usefulness of applying the permaculture design principles and ethics to develop an organizational framework for a student-run farm by producing a handbook to organize the business infrastructure of the B Street Permaculture Institute in a useful and implementable way.

Hannah Gramson (2013, T): Berglund 200@1:30 PM

Title: The Science of the Séance: The Scientific Theory Behind the Spiritualist Movement
Major(s): History
Advisor(s): Lipin
Abstract: Only in the last thirty years have historians begun to seriously examine the importance of Spiritualism, a religious movement that came into prominence shortly after the Civil War. Prior to recent scholarship, very little had been written on the topic since its decline, as most historians had dismissed the movement as a marginal religion that had little, if any, lasting impact. Today, Spiritualism's influence on American culture, religion, politics, and science in the 19th century is better understood. As more scholars have begun to weigh in on the subject, there has been debate over whether Spiritualism can be better understood as a religion, a philosophy, a science, or a mere form of entertainment. This thesis draws from a variety of published pamphlets, articles, and books written by Spiritualists, self-proclaimed investigators, religious leaders, and scientists, between 1860 and 1890, to examine the arguments Spiritualists made through their application of scientific theory to a fundamentally religious philosophy in order to define Spiritualism as a "scientific religion." This thesis attempts to explain how Spiritualists tried to re-bridge the gap between science and religion that was beginning to emerge in the second half of the 19th century.

Kristy Granger (2013, T): McGill Auditorium@8:30 AM

Title: Natural Crafts for Environmental Education
Major(s): Environmental Studies w/ Sustainable Design Emphasis
Advisor(s): O'Day
Abstract: In the last few decades the amount of outdoor play our children experience has significantly dropped to mere minutes per day. Children today are spending more time in front of a screen then in the natural environment. A change from outdoor to indoor play is showing to have an impact on the development of a child resulting in an all-time high of obesity, ADHD diagnoses and prescriptions for anti-depressants. One way in which parents can provide more outdoor play is through summer day camps. This project developed a natural craft collection for a summer camp to foster a hands-on sensory approach in the outdoors. Twelve different natural crafts were designed such as natural play dough, twig rafts, and seed balls with directions and material lists included. The natural crafts were introduced to 84 children, ages 3-11, that attended this summer camp located in Eugene, Oregon. By creating the crafts the children were able to spend quality time in the outdoors learning about the natural world they live in. This collection has now been adopted into the day camp curriculum for future campers to enjoy.

Alycia Grassnickle (2013, T): Berglund 232@2:00 PM

Title: "Learning through Creative Artistic Expression" The Benefits of Art in Education
Major(s): FG. Education and Learning
Advisor(s): Phillips
Abstract: How does art help initiate the motivation to learn, support developmental growth, and aid students in thinking critically? The researchers referred to over thirty articles written on art education to help explore this question. The researchers then spent seven weeks conducting over thirty-six hours of observations in the atelier at the Early Learning Community with two different preschool classes. Researchers collected both audio and visual artifacts of the students' artwork, took detailed field-notes, developed a five-question, qualitative and quantitative, survey for forty parents, and created a ten-question, qualitative and quantitative, survey for the six teachers and one director. Their data was analyzed through comparison and trustworthy checks in weekly group meetings. The following themes emerged: 1) Art does help students with the motivation to learn, developmental growth, and critical thinking; 2) The majority of parents of ELC students strongly agree that art is an important aspect in education; and 3) The teachers in the ELC try to connect art to classroom learning as often as they can. These outcomes suggest that the framework of the Early Learning Community, which integrates the culture of Reggio Emilia, Montessori, and Waldorf educational approaches, is conducive to supporting engagement in the arts.

Christopher Grasso (2011, T): Marsh 101@12:30 PM

Title: Ecstasy vs. Anxiety: An argument for MDMA as a viable option for treatment-resistant PTSD
Major(s): Psychology
Advisor(s): Island
Abstract: Thousands of military servicemen and women have been killed and more than 30,000 have returned from service bearing physical wounds and disabilities. Still, there is another injury that is just as physical and often underestimated or overlooked -- the psychological wound. Since cognitive and psychological traumas are internalized in contrast to externally visible wartime injuries, they are frequently undiagnosed. However, the psychological consequences of combat, injury, or simply working with others who are struggling in those circumstances, can be just as debilitating. Often treatments for psychological disorders incurred during service are ambiguous, unclear, unsuccessful or only partially effective, making recovery difficult. Although 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine, MDMA, has a clinical history it is no longer considered a 'viable' psychiatric treatment. However, the thesis of this presentation is that MDMA is a viable option for PTSD patients unresponsive to anti-depressant treatment or cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) treatment alone. The inadequacy of traditional treatments for some PTSD sufferers is explored. The risks, dose considerations, side effects, and benefits of the therapeutic use of MDMA in a clinical setting are further explored. MDMA is presented, through various studies, as an effective treatment tool to be used in conjunction with CBT therapy.

Sean Grasso (2012, T): Taylor Auditorium: Marsh 216@2:00 PM

Title: Welcome to Vegas
Major(s): Media Arts: Film and Video Production
Advisor(s): Hardacker
Vaisburd
Abstract: Las Vegas is a city which is known for its mega resorts and touristic lifestyle, but what is often overlooked is the half a million residents. The city is the backdrop of Untitled, a personal documentary by Film/Video senior Sean Grasso. The film is a meditation on the city of Las Vegas, multigenerational differences, and the process of filmmaking. Grasso interviews his family and gives the viewer insight into his thinking via voice over narration in an attempt to make sense of the day to day life in the city and explores the expressive qualities of the film medium.

Kelly Greathouse (2011, T): Marsh 101@11:00 AM

Title: Assessing Self-Efficacy, Self-Regulation, and Metacognition to Predict Achievement and Boost Retention
Major(s): Psychology
Advisor(s): Kleinknecht
Abstract: Educational psychology has produced a wide array of findings about the factors that influence academic achievement; however, it is not yet clear which factors contribute the most explanatory power. The primary contenders are: (a) Self-regulated motivation (directing one's efforts toward controlling outcomes and learning experiences) as opposed to controlled motivation; (b), Metacognition (the ability to regulate and reflect on one's own thinking and learning process), and (c) Self Efficacy (one's confidence in their ability to meet academic challenges). Whereas research shows that each factor alone predicts academic achievement, previous research with Introductory students at Pacific University suggests that Metacognition (as measured at the end of the term) plays the most significant role in academic success, when compared with self-regulated motivation. The current study builds on this research in two ways: (1) by adding in a measure of self-efficacy; and (2) by measuring each factor twice, at the beginning and at the end of the term. Specifically, students were tested twice on three measures: a shortened version of the Metacognitive Awareness Inventory, the Learning Questionnaire (SRQ-L), and Self Efficacy for Learning. Both early semester and late semester scores are used to predict students' achievement in an Introductory level course. Results of this study, in conjunction with previous research, can be used to develop effective means of promoting academic achievement and thus retention throughout college.

Kelly Greathouse (2011, T): CLIC@8:30 AM

Title: France's Secret Army: An analysis of how the French Resistance is portrayed in Art and Film
Major(s): World Languages: French
Advisor(s): de Larquier
Abstract: The French Resistance is considered one of the most heroic movements in French history, in which hundreds of French citizens courageously fought against the Nazi occupation and the corrupt French collaborators during WWII. This movement gradually emerged from the unoccupied zone of Southern France and the shadows of the northern Nazi occupied zone to successfully sabotage and interfere with their mission. Although the French Resistance was once seen as a courageous and well organized group, the heroic view has faded since the end of the war. Through an analysis of these events are portrayed in art and film over time, we come to see how this view has changed in three distinctive periods of time: from a patriotic notion of the unifying power and expression of the entire French nation, to a romanticized individualistic perspective focused on personal strengths and emotions, and finally to the current realistic views of the struggles encountered by people of the French Resistance.

Wade Green (2009, T): Marsh 201@8:30 AM

Title: Atlantic Schism: A Look at The Divergence of the World Views of the United States and Ireland
Major(s): International Studies
Advisor(s): Moore
Abstract: What is the cause of the divisiveness between America and Europe? While the Bush Administration is generally thought to have caused much of the break in relations between old world and new, a deeper ideological rupture is the true reason for the division. A look into Ireland, a microcosm of present and future Europe, reveals a people and place philosophically different than in America. Based on a more communitarian model of society, Ireland, and thus Europe seek to move into a post-modern world that the United States has had no strong reason to join. America’s stance as a more individualist superpower is fundamentally at odds with the European model. The future of relations between the two is more complex than any regime change on either side of the ocean, and will depend on the ability of both world views to identify and understand each other’s goals, as well as make key ideological concessions.

Kathaleen Green (2012, T): Taylor Auditorium: Marsh 216@2:30 PM

Title: For Now, We Live
Major(s): Media Arts: Film and Video Production
Advisor(s): Hardacker
Vaisburd
Abstract: It can be difficult to remember what losing someone is like, especially when it happens so frequently. For Now, We Live is a narrative film looking back at that first loss of someone you're incredibly close to, how the relationships around you develop, and learning how to move on. Senior Film/Video student, Kat Green, will discuss the inspiration, influences, and filmmaking processes that lead to Emma's story and the decision to make it real.

Alexandra Greenberg (2013, P): Price 1st Floor Hallway@1:00 PM

Title: Using heart rate (HR) monitors to evaluate on-shift and off-shift physical activity of professional municipal firefighters
Major(s): Exercise Science
Advisor(s): Henry
Abstract: Firefighting is one of the most dangerous non-combatant occupations because it imposes significant physiological and psychological stressors; thus, it is imperative that firefighters maintain an appropriate level of physical fitness. Typical recommendations for maintaining aerobic fitness suggest at least 30 minutes per day of moderate physical activity. Although active, professional firefighters should abide by this guideline at the very least, little is known about the actual physical activity habits of firefighters. Purpose: To determine physical activity levels of fulltime professional firefighters for both their on-shift days and their off-shift days. Methods: For purposes of this study, heart rate (HR) was utilized to represent physical activity. Each firefighter was provided with a HR monitor and required to wear it for three consecutive days (one day on-shift and two days off-shift, or one complete duty cycle). Prior to data collection, all anthropometric data was entered into the HR monitor and corresponding software, the physical activity level was set to moderate, and the recording frequency was set to measure HR every two seconds. Participants were asked to complete a questionnaire about their lifestyles (e.g. perceived activity level) and were required to maintain an activity log to record all pertinent events during the three-day testing session. Upon completion of the three testing days, HR data was downloaded to computer, analyzed via software, and reconciled with activity logs (verifying physical activity) to provide amount and intensity of physical activity. Results: To be presented.

Dawn Greene (2011, P): Strain Hall 2nd Floor@2:00 PM

Title: Preventing Ovarian Cancer in Women with BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutations: Oral Contraceptives vs. Analgesic Drugs
Major(s): Biology
Advisor(s): Rynd
Abstract: The American Cancer Society estimated that in 2010 in the U.S., about 21,880 women received a diagnosis of ovarian cancer and about 13,850 women would die from ovarian cancer. BRCA1 and BRCA2 are tumor suppression genes specifically associated with developing breast cancer and/or ovarian cancer. Women with mutations in either or both of these genes are at a significantly higher risk of developing ovarian cancer. Although the exact cause of ovarian cancer remains unknown, there are currently two major theories about the causes. The first theory involves the relationship between ovulation and developing ovarian cancer, while the second theory involves the inflammation that follows monthly ovulation. I propose to use a transgenic mouse model whose tumor suppression genes, those that correlate to human BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes, are deleted. Mice would be treated with either oral contraceptives or analgesic drugs to determine whether these medications would prevent ovarian cancer.

Dustyn Greenhalgh (2008, T): Price 203@3:00 PM

Title: The Autocrine Function of Insulin in Pancreatic Beta Cells
Major(s): Biology
Advisor(s): Halpern


Abstract: Pancreatic beta cells’ prime function is to release insulin as a regulatory device to keep blood glucose levels low. Much research has been done on the mechanism of insulin release from these beta cells, such as rates of release and modulators of beta-cell function. Recent research into various cell functions, such as glucose metabolism and calcium release, suggests that beta cells actually use insulin as its own positive modulator for insulin release.

Staci Gregorio (2010, T): Marsh 206@1:00 PM

Title: Supreme Opinion or Public Independence: The Supreme Court?s Power Over Public Opinion
Major(s): Politics and Government
Advisor(s): Boykoff
Van Dyk
Abstract: The Supreme Court holds the power to decide the legitimacy of laws and statutes throughout the country. This power, however, is not absolute and is often limited. Public opinion has seemingly affected landmark decisions throughout history. Public opinion shifts after the decisions in Roe v. Wade, Brown v. Board of Education, and Bush v. Gore were examined in order to see whether the Court can actually alter public opinion. After looking at these three cases it is evident that an actual shift in opinion is a result of larger social events rather than the Court’s influence.

Patrick Griess (2009, T): Price 204@3:30 PM

Title: PUMA: Pacific University Musical Artist
Major(s): Computer Science
Advisor(s): Williams
Abstract: Rhythm games like Guitar Hero and Rock Band allow players to simulate playing real instruments to the beats of provided music. PUMA is a computer game that allows users to play along to their own music files with the use of a keyboard or a USB guitar shaped controller. Using mathematical analysis PUMA is able to scan a music file and determine the beats of the song. Any MP3 music file can be used without the need of game developers, allowing PUMA to be a standalone application for computers. This allows for an endless amount of content.

Benjamin Griffin (2011, T): Taylor Auditorium: Marsh 216@4:00 PM

Title: Pacific Online Parent Orientation: Answering their questions so you don't have to!
Major(s): Media Arts: Integrated Media
Advisor(s): Geraci
Abstract: Why can't you tell me my student's grades? Can his pet iguana come with him to school? Just what the heck is a Boxer? Years of experience working on freshman orientation offer one a unique perspective on the tribulations of disseminating information to parents of new students. With the increased reliance on electronic media for communication and Pacific's continued commitment to staying "green", there is not a single source for all the pertinent information a parent may want to know before dropping their most precious cargo off at school. Utilizing rich media, attractive information design and modern web practices, Pacific Online Parent Orientation seeks to address these issues through the development of a website to create that "one-stop-shop" for anything a parent may want to know before the big day. This presentation will discuss the preparation and process for such a project, the challenges and triumphs of development, and the implementation into Pacific's current Orientation model.

Alexandra Grigar (2012, T): Taylor Auditorium: Marsh 216@3:00 PM

Title: Hung Far Low
Major(s): Media Arts: Film and Video Production
Advisor(s): Hardacker
Vaisburd
Abstract: In a backwards and bizarre world, Ace, Ringo and Bruno must try and stick together through a string of very unfortunate events. Hung Far Low, a quirky, dark comedy, delves into the lives and friendships of these three unusually odd, and downright curious characters. Who are Ace, Ringo and Bruno? What surprises do they have in store? This short narrative film highlights the experience in filmmaking Ali Grigar has accumulated over her time here at Pacific University, including studies in narrative and documentary production, experimental film, video installation, and film theory. Writing, directing, producing, and editing the film has allowed Ali to have full creative control over the final product of Hung Far Low. Through this project she is able to work with her strengths in storytelling, art design/direction, and editing to transport the viewer into this outlandish world that is uniquely her own.

John Grillo (2010, T): CLIC@11:30 AM

Title: On Myths and Men: How Japanese Mythology & Folklore Shapes Modern Media in Japan
Major(s): International Studies
Advisor(s): Mahar
Abstract: Mythology and folklore walk with us, even today. Many believe that these are cultural relics and antiquities and have long since been replaced with more rational forms of human history or better stories created in the modern age. This thesis will refute those notions by showing that previous uses of cultural mythology are being used widely and frequently to effect real world change, especially in Japan. Myths and folktales are constantly being retold and transmuted into other forms, especially in entertainment. The narratives of myth still affect modern society both as sources of influence and as tools of influence. This thesis presentation will attempt to reveal the difference between the two in the context of Japanese historical mythology and contemporary entertainment.

Robin Grossman (2008, T): Taylor Auditorium: Marsh 216@9:00 AM

Title: Who Chokes? Effects of Reinvestment and Personality under Performance Pressure
Major(s): Psychology
Advisor(s): Schultz


Abstract: The purpose of this study was to investigate whether a certain personality type was more beneficial or detrimental to an individual’s performance under pressure. The concept of reinvestment offered by Masters, Polman, and Hammond (1993) had been shown to be a valid and reliable predictor of performance under pressure. Previous studies never addressed, however, whether there were a correlation between the reinvestment scale and any broader personality type. Members of both male and female college basketball teams were observed in the naturalistic setting of collegiate practices. A task of free-throw shooting was examined in both a high and low pressure situation. Each participant was administered the reinvestment scale and the NEO-FFI five factor model personality measure. It was hypothesized that participants who score high on the reinvestment scale would also score high on neuroticism, low on extraversion, and would have worse performance than their counterparts while under pressure. Results were reported.

Breanna Grove (2011, T): CLIC@9:00 AM

Title: Ils avaient deux amours: leur pays et Paris - The Paris of the Lost Generation
Major(s): World Languages: French
Advisor(s): de Larquier
Abstract: The phrase "Lost Generation" refers to the group of literary notables living in Paris and other European cities following the destruction of the Great War and their resulting sense of disconnection with life. This literary community included expatriate writers such as Ernest Hemingway, F. Scott Fitzgerald, and Gertrude Stein. Over-arching themes of loss and despair, detachment and self-evaluation, youth and innocence united these writers and their works. The war had destroyed the youth of the world, leaving a sense of emptiness in those left behind. The lives and works of the Lost Generation embodied this international burden. Despite the devastation of World War I wrecked on Europe, both physically and emotionally, Paris had retained its reputation as the capital of bohemian culture whose cultural scene was more permissive of literature and art that confronted established mores and codes of behavior. Paris became immortalized in the works of the génération perdue, characterized by cafés, the cabarets, and social freedom. Yet is the Paris of the Lost Generation works truly Parisian, truly French? This thesis will consider the depiction of Paris in expatriate works in contrast with the French literati's conception of Parisian culture and society as expressed in literature in an effort to understand more completely the Paris of the 1920s.

Matthew Guerrero (2014, T): Marsh 206@10:00 AM

Title: KP.org and the Kaiser Permanente Senior Citizen Population
Major(s): Public Health
Advisor(s): Peterson-Besse
Abstract: Personal health records (PHR) are online records that can be accessed by an individual from any internet accessible device. Kaiser Permanente has developed their own free personal health record portal called KP.org specifically for their members. KP.org allows a Kaiser member do things like make/cancel appointments, email doctors, check health records, view lab results, and order prescriptions online, making their experience with Kaiser a more convenient one. KP.org access may also lead to the patient being more aware and educated about his/her overall health. Senior citizens may have trouble using KP.org because of physical and mental limitations that come with aging, as well as the fact that they may lack in the education to successfully use a PHR like KP.org. This capstone presentation will review successful models that others have implemented to address this problem with the senior citizen population's lack of education on how to both use a computer and access health information through the internet. This presentation will also propose a new method to increase the usage of PHRs like KP.org, and in turn, result in a healthier senior citizen population.

Ashley Guieb (2013, T): Price 203@4:00 PM

Title: Response to Injury and Rehabilitation: Experience of Division III Athletes
Major(s): Exercise Science
Advisor(s): Withycombe
Abstract: Participation in sport and/or physical activity puts the body at risk of injury. Injuries in sports are common, and depending on the severity of the injury, athletes often have to overcome both physical and psychological obstacles. Given the relative prevalence of sport related injuries, a number of studies have been done on the injury and rehabilitation process. Although studies exploring the psychological response to injury and rehabilitation are vast, few have looked at student-athletes' experiences from a qualitative perspective, especially at the NCAA Division III level. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to explore athletes' personal experiences as they cope with injury and undergo rehabilitation, using an existential phenomenological approach. The Response to Injury and Rehabilitation model will be used to guide the development of the thematic structure for the data (Wiese-Bjornstal, Smith, Shaffer, & Morrey, 1998). This model will help situate the data within a larger perspective, thus enhancing the meaningfulness and application of the findings (Smith & Deemer, 2000). The results from this study will help all sport personnel be aware of the psychological issues facing injured NCAA Division III student-athletes. Results and discussion to be presented on Senior Projects Day.

Patrick Guild (2007, T): Marsh 214@9:00 AM

Title: Inventing the Authentic: A Creative Thesis
Major(s): English: Creative Writing
Advisor(s): Pagan


Abstract: My thesis journeys from the wind-swept shores of Hawai'i to the rocky coastline of Oregon, mimicking my own voyage so many years ago. In a mixture of poetry, fiction, and non-fiction, I explore the search for self-awareness through tales of family and childhood adventures. These are prefaced by a critical introduction on the struggle of minority writers who seek to reach a larger audience and still remain true to their heritage"a problem many writers from Hawai'i encounter.

Patrick Guild (2007, T): Marsh 212@2:00 PM

Title: "Reinventing China: Orientalism, Mistranslation, and Modernism"
Major(s): English: Literature
Advisor(s): Steele


Abstract: For centuries, Western scholars have studied the "Orient," often misrepresenting cultures and creating false stereotypes. The term "Orientalism" did not receive a negative connotation until the mid-1970s with Edward Said's landmark work of the same title. In 1914, poet Ezra Pound received a package from the wife of the late Orientalist, Ernest Fenollosa. This package contained Fenollosa's journals and studies on Chinese characters, which scholars contend is mostly flawed. However, through these mistranslations, Pound created new techniques and methods that reinvented poetry, essentially giving rise to Imagism"the first organized Modernist literary group"and influenced innumerable artists up to the present day. Pound also opened the door to the East for Western writers, giving classical Eastern artists their long-overdue recognition and equal importance with established Western writers.

Alicia Guildner (2011, T): Price 202@11:00 AM

Title: The relationship between athletic identity and academic success in Division III college student-athletes
Major(s): Exercise Science
Advisor(s): Concepcion
Abstract: Sports are a societal phenomenon in America. Many young people will participate in one, if not multiple sports, at some point during childhood or adolescence. College sports such as football and basketball are glorified so highly in the media that it can be easily forgotten that these young adults are also students. During college, both scholastic competence and athletic competence are domains of self-concept that contribute to global self-esteem (Harter, 1990). Athletic identity (AI) is the degree to which an individual identifies with the role of athlete (Brewer et al, 1993). Athletic identity is considered to be a cognitive structure and a social image that guides the processing of self-related information (Brewer, 1993). This study aims to investigate whether or not there is a relationship between athletic identity and academic success at Pacific University. Little investigation has been done on the subject when it comes to Division III student athletes. All varsity head coaches at Pacific University were sent an email requesting that they forward an online survey link to their athletes. The survey included questions about academic information, athletic identity, and athletic background. Once surveys had been collected, results were analyzed and compared using SPSS. Results will be discussed.

Bennett Guira (2009, T): Price 214@11:00 AM

Title: The Role of Angiogenesis Inhibitors and Monoclonal Antibodies in Cancer Treatment
Major(s): Biology
Advisor(s): Halpern
Abstract: Angiogenesis, the formation of new blood vessels from pre-existing ones, plays an important role in cancer progression. Initially, tumors grow by using their own nutrient supply and grow up to 1-2 mm. Once their nutrient supply is deficient, they begin to secrete growth factors such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and angiogenesis is triggered from blood vessels nearby. When the new blood vessels reach the tumor, they provide more nutrients and oxygen for the tumor to keep growing and also allow the tumor to spread throughout the body through the circulatory system. For these reasons, scientists have been trying to develop cancer treatments the inhibit angiogenesis. In this capstone, I review one treatment that has been developed to inhibit angiogenesis, the monoclonal antibody Bevacizumab (Avastin™). I describe the mechanism of action by Bevacizumab, which inhibits angiogenesis by binding to and inhibiting VEGF. I also report on results from clinical trials. In 2004 it was the first U.S. FDA approved treatment that affects angiogenesis. Since then, Bevacizumab has been shown to increase the survival rate of patients with colorectal cancer and is in clinical trials for other cancer types. Overall, the angiogenesis inhibitor, Bevacizumab has been a successful treatment for cancer and much more can be accomplished by studying it more.

Frankie Guros (2009, T): McGill Auditorium@9:30 AM

Title: How to Run a College Newspaper at a Small Private School
Major(s): Media Arts: Journalism
Advisor(s): Cassady
Abstract: In the current age of media convergence and conglomeration there is still a niche where newspapers still hold value and importance: the student-run college newspaper. No other media outlet is able to cover the small community of a collegiate campus as a student-run newspaper can. However, there are many internal challenges the newspaper must overcome, such as dealing with the secrecy that inherently comes with covering a private institution or keeping a consistent quality to the publication which changes its top editor position practically yearly. Running a successful paper that fulfills its duty to keep its community informed and to promote the type of discussion that is practiced at a liberal arts school is an art form. My project is to create a manual that will serve as a guide for editors of such newspapers to assist them in operating their publication.

Shanlee Gusman (2013, T): Berglund 232@1:00 PM

Title: Real World Applications of Math in a Migration Curriculum
Major(s): FG. Education and Learning
Advisor(s): Zijdemans Boudreau
Abstract: How do we encourage young people to integrate the language of math into their everyday lives? The Forest Grove Community School wants to address this question as it has noticed that many students do not understand how math applies to real world situations. To support this goal, we created an authentic learning experience for the third and fourth graders. Using observations, surveys, interviews, and research to inform our work, we have created a mini unit. This unit consists of five lesson plans, including an experiential learning opportunity, to be incorporated into the school's themed curriculum on migration. In these lessons, students will address the question, "How do house cats affect the Oregon junco population?" They will analyze the populations of juncos and house cats in the Forest Grove area by comparing graphs and interpreting their own data collected during a field trip activity. Based on their findings, the students will create an informational brochure to share their conclusions with the local community.

Katherine Gutierrez (2010, T): CLIC@2:30 PM

Title: The Historical Memory Law in Spain: the Importance of Memory and History for Identity
Major(s): World Languages: Spanish
Advisor(s): Christoph
Abstract: With this project I will examine the Historical Memory Law that passed in Spain in 2007. This law gives the opportunity for Spanish people and their descendents exiled due to the Spanish civil war and the subsequent dictatorship of Francisco Franco, to officially recuperate their Spanish nationality through the eyes of the Spanish government. I focus on the importance of memory, history, identity, and the testimonies of Spanish Exiles. Through examining the testimonies of those who experienced exile, there is an understanding of how the Historical Memory Law is making an impact in Spain. I also include a personal element regarding my own “lost” Spanish identity that I didn’t begin to recover until my experience at Pacific University and studying abroad in Spain.

Kaitlyn Gutierrez (2013, T): Berglund 145@10:30 AM

Title: When Two Cultures Go Walking
Major(s): English: Creative Writing
Advisor(s): Postma
Abstract: My creative writing thesis consists of one completed short story as well as a critical study of novelist Sherman Alexie's work. In his fiction, Alexie provides a rich perspective on how mixed race individuals navigate their place between cultures. Set in present day Oregon, my fictional piece, entitled "Grilled Cheese and Menudo", portrays an American teenage girl born to a white mother and a Hispanic father. My character navigates her way through a difficult weekend with her Hispanic father in which she is forced to come to terms with the sharp differences between her two heritages. I explore what it is like to grow up with two sets of traditions and ideals and how that tension can shape an individual. In my thesis I also examine the way in which Sherman Alexie critiques contemporary culture in the United States by writing about his own experiences as a Native American. By comparing and contrasting his experiences with my own, I consider the way that inherited culture shapes who I am.

Craig Gutman (2008, T): Price 203@9:30 AM

Title: Characterization of the Copper-Binding Site of NosL of the Nitrous Oxide Reductase System
Major(s): Chemistry
Advisor(s): Chan


Abstract: The reduction of nitrous oxide to dinitrogen is an important step in the global nitrogen cycle and is catalyzed by the enzyme nitrous oxide reductase. This enzyme contains a unique tetranuclear copper center that requires accessory proteins for assembly, including the protein NosL. Little is known about the function of NosL, but it has been shown to selectively bind Cu(I) in a suspected Cu(O/N)S2 binding motif. Here we detail our work in determining the Cu binding ligands in NosL. Using site-directed mutagenesis, an altered (NosL C24S) form of the protein was produced and was recombinantly expressed in E. coli on copper-supplemented media. A combination of a copper(I)-binding assay and ICP-OES analysis for copper was then used to determine the level of copper in the purified protein, and a comparison between the altered form and the wild type was made.

Christina Guzman-Alvarez (2014, T): Price 203@2:30 PM

Title: The effects of acute bouts of exercise on cognitive performance.
Major(s): Exercise Science
Advisor(s): Jackson
Abstract: Social and technological changes in the United States since the 1950's have substantially reduced overall physical activity levels and increased time spent in sedentary behaviors (Matthews, 2012). Sedentary behaviors have been prominent in adulthood for quite some time, but these behaviors have become more commonplace in children as of late. Due to budget cuts, physical education classes are being cut nationwide to increase class time in core subjects (Coe, 2006). As a result, recent estimates have indicated that younger generations, for the first time in the United States history, might live less healthy lives than their parents (Hillman, 2009). Therefore, it is important to find ways of increasing the physical activity in our daily lives in order to counteract the prevalence of childhood obesity. With such a large part of a child's day spent in school, would it be possible to incorporate movement into the classroom environment? Can learning still occur while one is in the process of exercising? Recently, there has been a growing body of literature linking physical activity to improved brain function and cognition (Hillman, 2009), suggesting that active learning may be an effective solution. Purpose: To investigate the effects of acute bouts of exercise on cognitive performance, and the effect of exercise timing on participants' reaction time, comprehension, and memory. Methods: Pacific University community volunteers performed a 15-minute bout of exercise (recumbent bike) in one of four conditions: Control, Prior-Delayed, Prior-Immediate, and Intermittent. Each condition (except Control) performed the bout at either 55% of their max heart rate (prior-delayed and prior-immediate) or 65% of their max heart rate (intermittent condition). Participants were tested on their comprehension, reaction time, and memory following their assigned bout of exercise. In addition, participants' levels of task motivation and confidence were assessed after completion of the biking task. Data Analysis: Data will be analyzed to determine differences between exercise conditions in the performance on the three cognitive tasks, as well as the interaction with task motivation. Results and Conclusions: Will be presented as to how timing of exercise affects cognitive performance. These results will enhance instructors' knowledge about the importance of physical activity and cognitive function.

Zachary Hackett (2007, T): Library Classroom@9:30 AM

Title: Measuring the Effects of Immigration on Low-skilled Native Workers in Oregon
Major(s): Economics
Advisor(s): Haag
Ruder

Abstract: The increase in the number of low-skilled immigrants crossing the border in search of a better life seems likely to drive down wages in job categories that require little education or prior training. While some studies have found that the presence of low-skilled immigrants in the United States enables companies that would otherwise have left the country to stay, in Oregon the effect of low-skill immigrants on low-skill native worker employment and wages seems to be negative.

Spencer Hadduck (2010, T): Taylor Auditorium: Marsh 216@10:00 AM

Title: Divergence
Major(s): Media Arts: Film and Video Production
Advisor(s): Hardacker
Vaisburd
Abstract: “Divergence” is a short narrative film about coming to faith in the wake of tragedy. The main character struggles to hold on to a reality that was never challenged or tested up to this point in his life. He is thrown into a violent and unrelenting formative experience where, no matter what, he will come out of it changed. This film has truly been a synthesis of my entire educational experience at Pacific. I came to Pacific University having a similar faith as the main character in my film. It was, for the most part, unchallenged and unrefined. My educational experience at Pacific has been nothing short of a trial by fire. And I have certainly changed. The story of “Divergence” is a reflection of how I have formed who I am over these four years. The whole process has required me to draw from every discipline I have studied from literature and creative writing to philosophy and studies in religion. I have especially enjoyed the writing process. I put the most energy into creating compelling characters and constructing an interesting narrative with those characters. Everything I learned as a film and video major has been the foundation for me to build my own character into each film I make. “Divergence” was no exception.

Chelsea Hagadone (2008, T): Marsh 206@2:30 PM

Title: To Keep Peace
Major(s): Politics and Government
Advisor(s): Seward


Abstract: When international problems become necessary to solve, for the literal good of humanity, states have shown to be hesitant to tackle the problem either individually or collectively. The unacceptability of the response to international problems such as genocide becomes apparent when time and resources become unnecessarily lost to those who need it most: the people who will die without it. Unfortunately, morality arguments will continue to fall on deaf ears as long as morality remains incongruent with national interests. Therefore, I propose to reanalyze national interest into a long-term perspective to show that realism and human rights intervention do follow the same lines. Moreover, I intend to show why American foreign policy towards human rights intervention creates ineffective responses and how these responses can be fixed.

Kevin Hagan (2007, T): Marsh 206@9:30 AM

Title: Expansion of Executive Power in the Bush Administration: Ordered Liberty or Road to Tyranny?
Major(s): Politics and Government
Advisor(s): Seward


Abstract: Is the expansion of executive power in the Bush Administration a reasonable restraint on liberty, or is it leading the United States down the road to tyranny? The concept of tyranny is operationalized by using a modified Dahlian framework, taken from his work on the forms of democracy. The Dahlian framework is applied narrowly to examine the expansion of power by the Bush Administration and whether the actions of the Bush Administration altered contestation and participation in ways that fundamentally undermine democracy. This thesis found that some aspects of the Bush administration are essentially benign, while others are deeply damaging to democracy and are characteristic of tyranny.

Katlyn Haggstrom (2009, T): Marsh 101@11:30 AM

Title: Should I Stay or Should I Go?: An Assessment of the Qualities That Lead People to Stay in College.
Major(s): Psychology
Advisor(s): Kleinknecht
Abstract: College retention refers to the magnitude to which students enroll each semester until graduation, study full-time and graduate in about four years. When students leave college before graduation, they are considered “dropouts;” dropouts reflect poorly on the institution. The majority of students who dropout do so before their second semester; overall, 20%-50% of college students do not “retain.” It should come as no surprise that institutions are invested in gaining a clear understanding of what qualities lead students to stay put, so that they may work towards increasing retention. Towards this end, Kuh and colleagues (2005) undertook the DEEP Project (Documenting Effective Educational Practice), in which they identified 20 institutions that show superior student engagement and high student retention. They then collated those qualities common to the set. This project creates a starting point for institutions interested in developing retention-increasing programs, however it does not yield clear operational definitions necessary for creating reliably successful programs. For this, more empirical work must be done. Regarding what work has been done to-date, in addition to high achievement and activity involvement, research suggests that easy maintenance of lasting friendships, the creation of new friendships, and involvement in learning communities are correlated with retention. Logically, these factors appear to relate to the construct we call “social connectedness” (SC). Much of this research is based on students who leave, rather than assessing students who stay. By studying students who stay, we can better understand the construct of SC and why it might influence retention. To this end, in the present study we designed an instrument to measure three dimensions of SC (social, academic, and “mattering” to the institution); the instrument is being validated by comparing students at DEEP vs. non-DEEP schools. Additionally, degree of SC is being evaluated as a function of involvement in learning communities, receipt of institutional financial aide, and whether students have ever thought of leaving their current institution. Present study outcomes will provide institutions with valuable insight into how to best foster meaningful social connections so that aspirations for increased retention may be actualized.

Britney Hagihara (2012, T): Price 203@2:00 PM

Title: Entrapped in Hair
Major(s): Art
Advisor(s): Anderson
Abstract: I am doing portraits of woman from Pacific University from the ages of 18-22. I use my own artistic creativity to illustrate their hair to have new value of color and patterns. I use the colors of their hair to match with their personality and the shapes to match with the flow. I choose the colors based on personal relationships or on short conversation I have with the participants. I use colored pencils, graphite pencils, charcoal pencils/sticks, water-soluble pencils, multiliner pens, markers, acrylic and oil paints. These mediums it helps create the motion and the 'flow' of hair. By shading to show the depths within the hair and pattern of shapes of the hair will help the eye follow the hair throughout the piece. The objective is to have the viewer look at the woman's hair before the face and to have an appreciation for women's hair however it may be.

James Hague (2013, T): Price 214@10:30 AM

Title: The Roles of Biological and Abiotic Factors in the Development of Colony Collapse Disorder in the Domestic Honeybee, Apis mellifera
Major(s): Biology
Advisor(s): Alkaslassy
Abstract: The majority of consumer food products rely, to varying degrees, upon pollination by domesticated and wild bees. Within the last decade, domestic honeybee (Apis meliferra) populations have not only decreased, but many entire colonies have died with no central pathological factor confirmed as the primary cause. However, many factors have been correlated with colony collapse disorder (CCD), including infection by microsporidium Nosema ceranae, parasitism by Varroa destructor mites, viral infection, and consumption of the recently and widely used systemic neonicotinoid pesticides. No single factor has been labelled as the core cause; A high level of comorbidity between CCD factors, the spread of one infecctious factor by another--such as Nosemaosis spread by Varroa mites--and the ability of these factors to amplify and compound upon one another, indicates that an interplay of several of these factors results in the symptoms which we identify as CCD.

Joan Hahm (2007, T): Marsh LL21@3:00 PM

Title: The Many Pathways of Juvenile Corrections
Major(s): Social Work
Advisor(s): Doerfler


Abstract: mily Systems Theory suggests that sometimes behavior may have as much to do with the systems (family or groups) a person is a part of and the patterns established in those systems as it has to do with the personality of the individual. This approach encourages people to move away from blaming others and towards individual responsibility. The practicum student will evaluate the effectiveness of the services provided to non-formal clients by the Washington County Juvenile Department from the Family Systems perspective. The practicum student will critique the gaps in the services offered by the department.

Evan Hailstone (2010, T): Taylor Auditorium: Marsh 216@1:30 PM

Title: Weibaoshan
Major(s): Humanities, Coordinated Studies
Advisor(s): Geraci
Vaisburd
Hardacker
Abstract: In modern U.S. society people are bombarded everyday with images of how they should look, products they should buy, and things they should do in order to make them happy. Weibaoshan is an experimental film, which takes a critical look at life in this modern consumer-driven society. Inspired by ancient Taoist philosophy, this film explores the degrading effects excessive laws and prohibitions put forth and enforced by the state have on individuals; as well as, the need of human beings, and all life forms, to follow their own natural processes in order to overcome the constraints of society and attain contentment.

Christopher Hale (2014, T): Strain 121@9:30 AM

Title: The Endless Expanse
Major(s): Computer Science
Advisor(s): Khoja
Abstract: The video game industry is responding to the demand for replay value by using randomly generated content in games. The content ranges from item placement to level and world randomization. The Endless Expanse is a fantasy role playing video game that motivates the player by generating random history that is incorporated into the game play. JSON is used to generate events in the game history. The terrain is produced using a specialized noise cannon to generate lifelike continents & structures. The game is written in Java, and is playable on any device that has the Java Runtime Environment.

Beth Hall (2013, T): Berglund 200@2:30 PM

Title: Disabilities in Children's and Adolescents' Literature
Major(s): FG. Education and Learning
Advisor(s): Phillips
Abstract: The goal of our project was to evaluate and develop criteria for children and adolescent literature dealing with the topic of disabilities. We did this project at the request of Forest Grove Community School. For our project, we: 1) developed a criteria to evaluate books based upon a review of literature; 2) read and reviewed recommended books grades 1-8; 3) conducted focus groups with children grades 1-8 to determine how they select books and their thoughts of the word, "disability"; 4) selected books based upon an analysis of our data for read alouds grades 1-8; 5) interpreted the data and wrote final criteria for book selection and provided recommended book reviews for teachers at Forest Grove Community School. The data collected in the focus groups were analyzed (with data tables and analytic summary) and used to develop more specific criteria to be used by teachers as they grow their collections. Data were analyzed and a second analytic memo was written after the read alouds. Our research is trustworthy: we triangulated our data, sought multiple perspectives, practiced self-reflectivity, and incorporated themes from the literature on the power of literature and criteria for selecting children and adolescent literature. Our research illustrates a very real need for effective (quality of text; cover design; and back cover text) children and adolescent literature to be infused into the classroom. Not all books on disability send appropriate messages or engage the general student population. Teachers need to know their students and take care in the selection of books. The criteria and recommended reading lists our project produced will assist teachers in this pursuit.

Jayme Hall (2013, T): Berglund 200@2:30 PM

Title: Disabilities in Children's and Adolescents' Literature
Major(s): FG. Education and Learning
Advisor(s): Phillips
Abstract: The goal of our project was to evaluate and develop criteria for children and adolescent literature dealing with the topic of disabilities. We did this project at the request of Forest Grove Community School. For our project, we: 1) developed a criteria to evaluate books based upon a review of literature; 2) read and reviewed recommended books grades 1-8; 3) conducted focus groups with children grades 1-8 to determine how they select books and their thoughts of the word, "disability"; 4) selected books based upon an analysis of our data for read alouds grades 1-8; 5) interpreted the data and wrote final criteria for book selection and provided recommended book reviews for teachers at Forest Grove Community School. The data collected in the focus groups were analyzed (with data tables and analytic summary) and used to develop more specific criteria to be used by teachers as they grow their collections. Data were analyzed and a second analytic memo was written after the read alouds. Our research is trustworthy: we triangulated our data, sought multiple perspectives, practiced self-reflectivity, and incorporated themes from the literature on the power of literature and criteria for selecting children and adolescent literature. Our research illustrates a very real need for effective (quality of text; cover design; and back cover text) children and adolescent literature to be infused into the classroom. Not all books on disability send appropriate messages or engage the general student population. Teachers need to know their students and take care in the selection of books. The criteria and recommended reading lists our project produced will assist teachers in this pursuit.

Chloe Hallyburton (2013, T): Price 1st Floor Hallway@1:00 PM

Title: Running patterns and injury: A meta-analytic review
Major(s): Exercise Science
Advisor(s): Faulk
Abstract: The high incidence of lower extremity injuries in runners has led researchers to study ways in which altering habitual running patterns might reduce injury, including altering the use of footwear and changing gait technique. The resulting changes in kinetic and kinematic properties have been perceived as indicators of a change in probability of sustaining a running-related injury. Purpose: The purpose of this meta-analysis was to (1) quantitatively synthesize studies comparing either barefoot (BF) versus shod running or forefoot (FFS) versus rearfoot strike (RFS) patterns in order to determine which gait technique and footwear are most effective in reducing running related injury; and (2) identify study and/or sample characteristics that may moderate the association between gait pattern/footwear and injury. Methods: Studies were selected based on Internet searches of journal databases using the keywords footwear, foot strike, barefoot, shod, minimalist, and Vibram. To be eligible for inclusion, studies needed to compare kinetic, kinematic, or injury outcomes between groups comparing BF v. shod conditions or FFS v. RFS conditions. Five barefoot/shod studies and six FFS/RFS studies were analyzed separately using a fixed effects model. Analysis: Standardized measures of the effect of gait pattern and footwear on injury were calculated for each study and then synthesized into a single effect size using Comprehensive Meta-Analysis software. Results: FFS runners were 7 times less likely to sustain a running related injury than RFS runners, while barefoot runners were 2.5 times less likely to be injured than shod runners. Heterogeneity tests were not significant, so no moderation analyses were performed.

Hannah Halpern (2014, T): Marsh LL5@10:30 AM

Title: A Day In the Life
Major(s): Art
Advisor(s): Flory
Abstract: A visual exploration of the preservation of culture through photography, and the idea that it is both our differences and similarities that bring us together. Using interactive photography, participants in Trinidad & Tobago, and Portland, Oregon each documented a day in their life. This show is a culmination of their work, their film photography mixed with digital portraits to create a means for viewers to compare and contrast the lives and stories of those involved; ultimately bringing spectators to a greater understanding and appreciation of the complexities that bind us.

Mary Hambly (2007, T): Taylor-Meade: Art Division@11:30 AM

Title: Following the Beat: Rhythm's Affect on Childhood Speech and Motor Development
Major(s): Music
Advisor(s): Stephens


Abstract: Linguistic and motor developments are very important in children between the stages of pre-kindergarten and third grade. Musical rhythm, mainly implemented in school, helps with speech and motor development. This paper will discuss the body's natural reaction to different forms of rhythm, such as visual or aural rhythm. It will also look at many child development and Primary School texts to support the argument that music and rhythm play such a large role in speech and motor development that they should be included in a child's pre-school and elementary school education.

Abigail Hamel (2013, T): Marsh 101@2:30 PM

Title: Middle Skilled Jobs? The relationship between the Hollowing Out Of Middle Skilled Workers and Jobless Recoveries
Major(s): Economics
Advisor(s): Haag
Abstract: The recoveries of the last three recessions in the United States have been unusual. Historically, when a country enters recovery, unemployment begins to decrease, while output begins to increase. In the last three recessions, the country has returned to a normal level of output quickly. While, unemployment levels have remained above the normal. The term used to describe this type of recovery is a jobless recovery. Since the mid 1980s, the United States has seen a decrease in the amount of middle skilled jobs that are available. The diminishing amount of middle skilled jobs can be used to describe the reason for which the United States has seen prolonged high levels of unemployment in the last three recessions. Using disaggregated industry level data for the United States economy I have established a distinction between high, middle, and low skilled jobs within the United States economy. Using this data, three separate linear regressions will be performed, analyzing the recovery of each of these sectors relative to one another. This methodology will allow a further understanding of a loss of middle skilled workers and what relationship that loss has with jobless recoveries that have been exhibited in each of the last three recessions.

Kira Hamer (2009, T): Marsh 101@1:00 PM

Title: Finding the Common Ground: How to Best Foster High Achievement in Elementary School Students
Major(s): Psychology
Advisor(s): Kleinknecht
Abstract: The purpose of this presentation is to discuss “best practices” in early childhood education from a developmental psychological perspective. An examination of existing literature suggests that best practice involves three factors: 1) that best practice uses play and break taking, 2) student feedback is important to teacher self-evaluation, and 3) that the use of student support and positive peer pressure is best for fostering high levels of achievement. Play and taking breaks avoids feelings of being overwhelmed and allows students to have free time to do what they chose; student feedback such as teacher-evaluation questionnaires are helpful in aiding teacher self-reflection; and students that have a greater chance of staying in school when they have a family and peer support system.  Though these recommendations stem from empirical literature, not all experts agree on the “top three” elements of best practice. As such, if one were to continue to refine recommendations to be made to teacher education programs, for example, one should also assess what various experts in the field of teacher education and developmental psychology think regarding how to best foster high levels of achievement in elementary school students. This presentation will end with a discussion of how one might go about planning such an endeavor, that is, interviewing resident experts on their perceptions of “what is best.”

Sean Hamer (2010, T): Price 203@1:00 PM

Title: Nutritional Survival Guide For Healthy Campus Living
Major(s): Environmental Studies
Advisor(s): Van Buskirk
Abstract: Adjusting to college life can be tough to handle, especially when it comes to figuring out when and what to eat. My project looks at the overall health of college students and provides a detailed nutritional survival guide designed to help educate them and maximize their health. College students are not as healthy as they might think. According to University of New Hampshire researchers, students at UNH are not meeting recommended nutritional intake of fruits and vegetables, and over one-third of them are obese. Eating healthy is vital to one’s well being, especially during college when stress and anxiety are at high levels. The nutritional survival guide that I developed presents an array of topics that help educate students about the key role that nutrition plays in their health. It also provides a list of healthy foods offered by Pacific University that are critical to student’s health. Numerous times throughout the spring semester I distributed fact sheets with nutritional information during dining hours at Pacific University food services. The completed manual will be available for students to read in the University Center. Nutrition plays a key role in maintaining a healthy body, especially during a hectic time like college. The nutritional survival guide that I developed helps students become more mindful eaters and educates them about the importance of healthy eating.

Vanessa Hancock (2013, P): Strain Hall 1st Floor@3:00 PM

Title: The Art and Chemistry of Copper Patinas
Major(s): Chemistry
Advisor(s): Bregel
Abstract: Residing at the interface of art and science, copper patinas can enlighten first year students of more advanced chemistry topics. This project is proposed as a general chemistry final project exploring electrochemical reactions of copper which lead to visual color changes on the surface of the metal known as a patina. Copper metal was exposed to various ions in solution under different conditions and varying color changes were observed. Black patina was reproducible while blue patina was more variable.

Jessica Hand (2007, T): McGill Auditorium@1:30 PM

Title: It's a Pacific Thing: Reaching Prospective Students Through Multimedia
Major(s): Media Arts
Advisor(s): Geraci


Abstract: Why did you come to Pacific? What has kept you here? As high school seniors and potential transfer students face decisions that will impact their futures, they often find themselves bombarded with print and electronic materials promoting schools throughout the country. We've all been there. The decision can be daunting, and research has shown that potential students want to hear first-hand, directly from current college students, what makes a particular school special. Being a transfer student myself, I often found the CD-ROMs that some schools sent out to be very compelling. This project is an interactive CD-ROM that can be used both as a promotional piece sent out to prospective students directly and as a presentation piece for college fairs and Pacific recruiting events. It features video interviews of students and faculty, as well as images and information about what it's like to attend Pacific. It aims to utilize my experiences as a transfer student, as an Integrated Media major, and as a Pacific employee in a way that demonstrates the skills and knowledge I have gained here, as well as give something back to the University and help future students discover what Pacific can offer them.

Raissa Hang (2011, T): Price 203@2:00 PM

Title: Water-soluble quantum dots as novel tools for sugar biosensing
Major(s): Chemistry
Advisor(s): Cordes
Abstract: Surface-modified fluorescent CdTe/ZnS core-shell quantum dots (QDs) were explored for sugar sensing applications. Surface modifications focused on characteristics of water solubility and specific sugar binding. In an attempt to attain such characteristics, varied ratios of mercaptopropionic acid and (mercaptophenyl)boronic acid were attached to the surface of the QDs, and subsequently investigated through sugar binding studies. Preliminary results showed that the modified QDs showed greatly enhanced fluorescence after addition of sugars in buffered aqueous solutions. QDs hold great promise for sugar biosensing and with further study we hope to achieve improved water solubility and analyte sensitivity.

Kristina Hankins (2011, T): Price 204@1:00 PM

Title: The effect of evaluation on the performance of an effort based task
Major(s): Exercise Science
Advisor(s): Jackson
Abstract: Background: The phenomenon of social facilitation was first observed by Norman Triplett in 1898. Triplet discovered that in the presence of others, task performance could be increased as opposed to when a participant is alone (Guerin, 1989). Since this first discovery, social facilitation has been examined in many ways and has developed into a complex field. One of the less explained aspects of social facilitation is the effect that evaluation can have. This research study examines the effects of evaluation potential on the performance of an effort based motor task. Purpose: To determine the effects of various levels of evaluation on the performance of an effort-based task. Methods: College-age participants performed a shuttle-run task in four social conditions based on the presence of the experimenter & perception of performance being evaluated: Alone w/o Evaluation, Alone w/Evaluation, Experimenter Present w/o Evaluation, Experimenter Present w/Evaluation. Data Analyses: The time to complete the shuttle run was collected, and the performance in each condition will be compared with a 2x2 (Experimenter Presence x Perceived Evaluation) ANOVA. Results & Conclusions: Will be presented as to the effects of physical presence and evaluation potential on the performance of an effort-based task.

Kalyn Hanna (2011, T): McCready Hall@1:00 PM

Title: Arrangements for Wind Ensembles
Major(s): Music
Advisor(s): Stephens
Abstract: My capstone will show my teaching and conducting capabilities, my strengths as an arranger, and will focus on certain aspects of music theory and music history. For my senior capstone, I have made arrangements of two pieces for instrumental ensembles. The first is a Gustv Mahler quartet, second is a Brahms piano Ballad. Gustav Mahler's "Klavierquartet in A minor" was originally written for piano and strings and I have rearranged it for piano and brass. I have also arranged it be shorter in length, as the original is over ten minutes long. The second piece I've arranged is Johannes Brahms' "Ballad in D Minor, Op 10:1" and is based on the Scottish folk tale "Edward". I have arranged this for full wind ensemble. The piece is an excellent way to educate the ensemble and my audience on the norms of the Romantic Era and the style of Johannes Brahms. In this capstone project I have tried to demonstrate what I have learned at pacific and what skills I can take into the future as a music educator.

Jennifer Hansen (2009, T): Price 202@10:30 AM

Title: The Effect of Vision on the Learning of a Novel Balance Task
Major(s): Exercise Science
Advisor(s): Jackson
Abstract: Background: Human postural stability is controlled by three main sensory modalities: somatosensory, vestibular, and vision. Sighted humans respond faster to visual stimulations as compared to auditory or somatosensory. Regardless of the modality, when one is removed, we tend to heighten our other senses to compensate for lost feedback. Furthermore, those who train without vision have been found to make greater use of vision once it is returned to them. Purpose: The purpose of this study is to examine the effect of various amounts of vision on the learning of a novel balancing task. Hypothesis: We propose that once vision is introduced to those who have practiced without vision, their ability to balance will significantly increase relative to those who practiced only with vision. Method: Participants were to practice a dynamic balance task on the stability platform and attempt to improve the time spent “in balance.” Participants were randomly assigned to practice the task with vision for the entire time, only the last 2 days, only the last day, or with no vision at all. Participants were tested on their ability to perform the task with and without vision following the practice trials. Results: There was significant difference in the performance of two groups during the post-test with no vision. There was no significance found when comparing the conditions to the transfer test or to the activity level. Conclusion: The hypothesis was not supported, but the results led to intriguing information regarding how specific combinations of vision and no vision affect the acquisition of the balancing task. Essentially, those who practice more without vision perform better in a post-test with no vision.

Chloe Hanson (2014, T): Berglund 216@1:30 PM

Title: Online Publishing as a Motivational Tool for Student Writing
Major(s): Education
Advisor(s): Zijdemans Boudreau
Abstract: How does online publishing influence students' motivation to write? Does the idea of writing to a larger audience make students more inclined to write, and how does this affect the quality of their writing? The purpose of this project is to create an online publishing website for teachers at the Forest Grove Community School to utilize as a motivational tool in order to help children improve their writing skills (Karchmer, 2001). Our hope is to create an environment where students are eager to submit written work because of these factors: online publishing supports student learning, motivates them, and gives them a sense of audience (Castek, Mangelson, Goldstone 2006). Our research included triangulated data: pre and post-surveys, artifacts which included student's written submitted work, informal interviews with teacher and students, and in class observations. Pre-surveys were distributed to determine which elements should be incorporated into their website (i.e. theme design, website name and genre of writing) and to gauge their current motivation and confidence in their writing ability. Post surveys were done to assess the effectiveness of the online publishing site as well as any significant differences in students' motivation to write. Artifacts created by students were used as published works on the website. Student interviews were conducted to assess how they felt about publishing their work on the web and whether or not they thought it was a motivating factor. Teacher interviews were conducted to help determine the effectiveness of the website and any changes that needed to be made. All of these elements, including classroom observations, were analyzed for connections to the literature and used to inform the site development. We anticipate that our project will have a generally positive influence on students' motivation to write and the quality of their written work.

Ruth Happ (2010, T): Berglund 200@2:00 PM

Title: Jane Austenmania: Why the Current Craze and Why Should We Care?
Major(s): English: Literature
Advisor(s): Beard
Abstract: Austen’s six novels have not gone out of print since she wrote them about two hundred years ago. They have been added to, with prequels and sequels and spin-offs, as well as adapted for film or television about thirty-seven times. Recently, her texts have been modified in “mash-ups,” like Pride and Prejudice and Zombies and Sense and Sensibility and Sea Monsters. Austen’s work has thus always been popular, but why the current craze? This project explores answers to this question, looking into Austen’s texts, critics’ commentaries, as well as web-sites and blogs, with the purpose of not only uncovering the reasons for Austen’s modern-day popularity, but also to expose what these answers might say about our current society. The popularity of Austen’s works and their offshoots may reflect, beyond nostalgia for a past era, a commonly-shared hope for love, commitment, equality, and personal growth in relationships, rather than the sex-laden, loveless “hook-up system” common to college students, supported by the media and society at-large. Understanding the contrast between today’s cultural obsession with sex, as well as the lack of personal connection due to impersonal technology, and Austen’s settings, characters, and storylines, may help bring a greater awareness of today’s practices and the driving forces behind them. The thesis presents a critique of modern day society’s lack of personal connection and commitment, in contrast to the patterns and set forms of building relationships in the Eighteenth Century.

Liane Harada (2012, T): Price 214@11:00 AM

Title: Identification of Speyeria zerene hippolyta Strains by Amplification of Mitochondrial DNA Sequences
Major(s): Biology
Advisor(s): Sardinia
Abstract: The Oregon Silverspot butterfly (Speyeria zerene hippolyta) is federally listed as a threatened species and is one of 15 subspecies of S. zerene that have dwindled in populations and range. The Oregon Silverspot butterfly populations were historically spread along the west coast from northern California to southern Washington with at least 20 separately known sites. Currently the most stable and commonly observed populations exist in four main sites of Oregon: Mt. Hebo, Cascade Head, Rock Creek, and Bray Point. In 2000 the captive propagation program was initiated at the Oregon Zoo and Woodland Park Zoo facilities in response to the extended declines of butterfly populations at the remaining four sites. Every year butterflies are collected from Mt. Hebo, Cascade Head, and Rock Creek then released in to Cascade Head, Rock Creek, and Bray Point. Mitochondrial DNA is maternally inherited in the Oregon Silverspot butterfly and was used to determine their geographical lineage. Obtained mtDNA was amplified using the PCR method and sequenced for 13 female Rock Creek and 6 Mt. Hebo samples. To assess the effects of the augmentation propagation program, varying haplotypes were compared to identify the successive strains of the Rock Creek and Mt. Hebo populations.

Ray Hargreaves (2007, T): McGill Auditorium@1:00 PM

Title: "Jessica and the Silver Eclipse"
Major(s): Media Arts: Integrated Media
Advisor(s): Geraci


Abstract: After spending six months producing and recording an audio CD of original music, I decided to use my Integrated Media major to its fullest potential. For the last year, I have designed and created the look and feel of the album, including an interactive portion within the CD, as well as an animated music video from the album's single in which I bridge the gap between the visual and the aural. During the presentation, I'll step you through an in-depth look at the influences behind the production, from an entertainment level to a personal one

Christopher Harlin (2014, T): Berglund 200@2:30 PM

Title: Evidence vs. Expectation: NFP and Investor Response
Major(s): Business
Advisor(s): Dong
Abstract: By using sources to evaluate the how the exchange rate of USD is affect by the release of new information. Specifically by using data like Nonfarm Payroll (NFP), which has a monthly release, I will evaluate investor response. In this way an evaluation of how investors view the data that they are given in an unbiased fashion or rather shape the data to fit their view. Ultimately, I will assess whether the investors see what they want to see in the information provided. Determining that the USD exchange rate is primarily effected by the expectation and settled by the evidence. Only if the data is strong enough will it be accepted and lead the investor response but if it is not at a significant enough level investors will act in response to expectation.

Erin Harman (2012, T): McGill Auditorium@9:00 AM

Title: Fernhill Wetland Walking Trail
Major(s): Environmental Studies
Advisor(s): Van Buskirk
Abstract: The Fernhill Wetland, owned and managed by Clean Water Services, is a wetland mitigation site and ongoing restoration project in the Forest Grove area. This site provides valuable habitat for amphibians, fish, mammals, and migratory waterfowl while serving the community as a favorite haunt for trail runners, walkers, and nature lovers. Despite its current use by wildlife, there is tremendous opportunity to increase the ecological function of the site through further restoration work. In addition, human use of the site could be enhanced by increasing the variety of trail options. For my project I have designed a feasible plan for a bird-watching trail that will take visitors into the wetland over an aesthetically pleasing boardwalk and footpath. There is a dual focus to my design. The first is to increase the trail diversity and thus the visitation of the site by adding a smaller, more natural trail suitable to nature viewing. The second is to increase the proportion of native plants and grasses suitable for nesting and foraging by waterfowl; this will benefit resident species and migratory species, and will increase biodiversity in the wetland. My design is presented as a grant proposal for Metro's Nature in the Neighborhoods grant, with the additional goal of influencing the development of a master plan by Clean Water Services for the management and restoration of this important local resource.

Richard Harman (2013, T): Price 202@11:00 AM

Title: Influence of Test Length and its Description on Walking Gait Economy
Major(s): Exercise Science
Advisor(s): Schot
Abstract: Among the many factors that influence movement strategy selection, economy is a powerful consideration. For walking, our preferred stride frequency (PSF) matches the resonant swing frequency (RSF) of a leg-pendulum model. At RSF, the force needed to maintain oscillation is minimized, so this mechanism is critical to walking economy. Prior lab work reveals PSF and RSF correlations are weak: it appears few walk optimally. We also note that directions in such studies are vague: participants usually are asked to walk at a comfortable, natural pace for several minutes. The task duration and associated perception of its demand may be inadequate to compel economical walking. Purpose: To examine gait (a) for a much greater test magnitude and (b) when the length of the walk is described by distance or time. Methods: Healthy adults performed two treadmill walking tests using fully self-selected gait behaviors. In Test1 subjects were told they would walk 2.5 miles at a self-selected speed that would then be held constant for the entirety of the test. No direct knowledge of the walking time was available. At Test2 participants were told they would walk for a specific amount of time, again at a self-selected speed to be maintained for the entire test. No direct knowledge of distance was available. Unbeknownst to the participants, this time was the exact amount required to complete the 2.5 miles in Test1. Heart rate and stride frequency were measured at 10 equally spaced intervals during testing. Analysis: Repeated measures 2x10 ANOVA was used to determine the effects of the magnitude definition and walking duration on walking speed, stride frequency and length, heart rate and walking economy. Results: Findings will be delivered during the presentation.

Kaitlyn Harper (2013, T): Price 202@1:30 PM

Title: Oligomerization as the limiting factor for bactericidal activity of plant defensins
Major(s): Biology
Advisor(s): Halpern
Abstract: Since their invasion of land around 500 million years ago, plants have evolved structures that have aided in the defense against threats ranging from environmental conditions to pathogenic microorganisms. To defend against microorganisms, many plants use defensins. Defensins are a group of immunity peptides that play an active role in fungicidal activity in plants; antibacterial activity of defensins in plants is limited. Defensins also occur in animals, however, where they commonly act against bacteria. My capstone examines possible reasons for the rarity of antibacterial activity in plant defensins. The structures of both the bacterial cell surface and plant defensins may contribute to this limited bactericidal function. However, few studies have looked at the relationship between structure of plant defensins and their function. Because defensins are conserved between plants and humans, and because they are very structurally similar, previous research on human defensins can be analyzed to predict the structure-function relationship of plant defensins. Human ?-defensin-2 (hBD2) has a tertiary structure homologous to that of plant defensins, but is active against multiple types of bacteria. This may be the result of quaternary oligomerization, which allows attachment and membrane pore formation, leading to cell death. To date, only one plant defensin has been found to dimerize upon exposure to bacteria. The inability of plant defensins to oligomerize in the presence of bacteria may explain the limited antibacterial activity of these peptides.

Devenie Harris (2011, T): Marsh 106@2:30 PM

Title: Babies Don't Come with a Handbook: Supporting Teen Parents in a Group Setting
Major(s): Social Work
Advisor(s): Schweitzer
Abstract: Becoming a parent changes everything. Whether a pregnancy is planned or unplanned having a baby changes the lives of all those involved. When transitioning into this new phase of life it is not unusual for parents to feel uncertain and possibly even experience high levels of stress and anxiety. First-time parents that are still in their teens typically experience even higher stress levels as they are trying to finish school, generally still living at home, and commonly struggling to figure out how they will financially support their child. Along with all of these pressures teen parents may lack support from their parents, their partner and may feel stigmatized by society. Research has shown that the lack of support in these areas can create a number of issues for both the baby and parents. Healthy Start of Washington County aims to give teen parents resources and support to overcome these challenges. This Senior Capstone project details the creation and implementation of support groups for teen parents in Washington County. The importance of support for young parents and evaluation results from the support groups will be discussed.

Megan Harris (2014, T): Price 203@10:30 AM

Title: Quantum Computational Studies of Molecular Non-Linear Optical Absorption in Metal Phthalocyanines
Major(s): Chemistry
Advisor(s): Johnson
Abstract: Sequential two-photon absorption is an interesting and practically useful property displayed by certain materials. One obstacle to practical use of these materials, however, is that elements of molecular structure that influence sequential two-photon absorption are not well understood. Computational modeling can be utilized to compute the ratio of the absorption cross-section of the triplet state to that of the ground singlet state in a given molecular structure, and this ratio can then be used to predict the presence of the reverse saturable absorption property. In our research, excitation transition energies are calculated for ground state and excited singlet and triplet states, and the oscillator strengths and wavelengths of these computed transitions are analyzed compared between molecules with structural variations. Those structures that give rise to high ratios for the triplet state to ground singlet state absorption cross-section over a narrow wavelength range are suggestive of the property. We report the comparison between indium and ruthenium phthalocyanines. Through these computations and comparisons, we hope to elucidate ways in which structural variation can optimize the reverse saturable absorption property already demonstrated experimentally for specific related structures.

Fallon Harris (2014, T): McGill Auditorium@4:00 PM

Title: Environmental Education for an Eco-literate Society
Major(s): Environmental Studies
Advisor(s): Gundersen
Abstract: Our children are entering a world full of complex ecological challenges that threaten the quality of life for all. We depend on educational institutions to provide our children with the tools, skills, and knowledge needed to live happy, healthy, and productive lives, as well as the ability to think critically and to solve complex problems, but our current education system is failing to provide children with these essentials. Raising an environmentally and ecologically literate generation of problem-solvers will help ensure that tomorrow's decision-makers are prepared for the challenges they will undoubtedly face. Over the past year I have been working with educators, community members, and children in order to become knowledgeable and confident about place-based pedagogies - an educational framework that has been shown to produce students who are better able to think critically, who on average receive higher test scores, are more empathetic, have better leadership skills, and are better equipped to handle the complexity of the eco-crises that exist than students taught using conventional, classroom-based teaching methods. Greatly inspired by the children and the adults I worked with, I decided to incorporate teaching and learning into my career. I have designed a not-for-profit organization called BEST, Be Environmental Stewards Today, that is based out of Beaverton and whose mission is to promote and inspire environmental stewardship and eco-literacy through hands-on environmental education for preschool age children and their families. All foundational documents are in place, making the organization ready to be incorporated.

Bryce Harris (2014, T): Marsh 106@2:30 PM

Title: "WTF!?" Faculty and Student Attitudes about what Constitutes Professional Etiquette
Major(s): Psychology
Advisor(s): Island
Abstract: More than half of the world's population uses mobile or smart phone devices. This means in an instant we can answer questions, access our social networks, take a photograph, read email, and order merchandise. The generational cohort currently in college, the Millennial Generation, grew up with social media, Internet, Google searches, and cell phones. Yet, their professors, largely Generation X and Baby Boomers grew up with less informational immediacy, greater professional and expert separation. Consequently etiquette, professional behavior, and expectations regarding the contextual use of technology vary across generations. Among non-Millennial generation professors, attitudes toward information immediacy technology (e.g., cell phones, laptops, and their associated software platforms) in the classroom differ. Some encourage the use of laptops, but not cellphones, still others have strict classroom policies that prohibit the use of any electronic technology. Students often argue that mobile or laptop access is an integral part of the learning experience, both within and outside the classroom. Electronic textbooks, Internet search engines, online dictionaries, calculators, and recording devices can facilitate both learning and offer alternative, less expensive resources. The restriction of these devices can hurt student-professor rapport and classroom morale. Since students are consumers of their education, the restriction of technology in the classroom may be perceived as disrespectful or a demonstration of the power differential in the class. Thus, the purpose of this project is to better understand the different perspectives between students and professors relative to immediate information technology and its role both in and outside of the classroom.

Sara Harsin (2007, T): Price 214@3:30 PM

Title: Influence of Acute Stretching on Shock Absorption Characteristics during Landing
Major(s): Exercise Science
Advisor(s): Schot


Abstract: Background: An obvious benefit of understanding movement science is the ability to recognize the potential for injury and prevention. An anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tear is a devastating injury to the knee, with a vast majority of the injured population being women. It has been suggested that women are more susceptible to ACL ruptures because they have more compliant muscle, tendon, and ligament tissue. This may be reasonable but could also be relevant to the many men who incur ACL injuries. Therefore, tissue compliance rather than gender should be used as the independent variable in studies exploring this issue. An acute-stretching program can elicit changes in tissue compliance to allow study of potential consequences related to this factor. Purpose: This project was to determine whether a change in tissue compliance affects biomechanical landing features. Methods: Approximately 10 sized-matched pairs of physically active men and women were recruited. All completed two sessions where the participants were asked to perform landings with two feet, preferred style, from a 60cm platform. At both sessions two sets of landing tests (10 trials in each) were done. One session served as a control while the other incorporated a full lower extremity stretching intervention between landing sets. The testing order was balanced for the sample. Select features of the forces applied during landing (peak force, time to peak, loading rate, leg stiffness) were extracted for analysis. Analysis: The effects of stretching and gender on the kinetics of landing were examined via factorial ANOVA.

Cassandra Hart Beehler (2013, T): CLIC@10:30 AM

Title: Shaping National Identity: The Role of the Educational System in France and the United States
Major(s): World Languages: French
Advisor(s): de Larquier
Abstract: There are many factors in determining one's national identity, and education is one of them. Different countries have different educational systems, and this shapes the way citizens view not only themselves, but the world as well. Comparing France and the United States through the lens of their respective educational systems, one can see that while these two countries share some similar values, their differences speak volumes in determining national identities. With France's centralized educational system, which focuses on equality for all, and the United States' highly decentralized education system, emphasizing individualism, one can come closer to realizing more of what it means "to be French," or "to be American."

Kelly Hartley (2008, T): Library Conference@1:30 PM

Title: In the Moment
Major(s): Art
Advisor(s): Flory


Abstract: Athletes pour all that they are into their desire to be the best. They will push themselves to their limits and beyond for a chance to accomplish their dreams. It is with this passion that athletes compete, giving their all, hoping for success. In the lives of athletes, there are many moments that will define who they are from that moment on. You will find athletes in moments of struggle, fear, anticipation, passion, hope, strength, and success. It is in these moments of uncertainty of what will happen next, moments of failure and success, that truly determines whether athletes can in fact become the best. It is through photography that I look to capture the moments of athletes that reveal the determination to be the best, the fear of failing and the hope of succeeding. It is when they are caught in the moment that we are truly able to see their story.